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My new commute

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
I've expanded my commute to the stage that now the car will stay at home every other day.
I'm still "intermodal"; I use the bus to reduce my one-way commute from 31 miles down to 21 miles.
My costs have dropped from $12 (gas), $1.60 (tolls) and $12 (for other car costs) to just $4 in bus fees (not including bike costs).

It’s a challenging 1.75 hour trip, about double the time by car.

But consider the upgrade. Before, bumper-to-bumper. Now, a mix of suburban streets & bike paths;



post #2 of 24
Thread Starter 
More pix;

post #3 of 24
Nice upgrade!
post #4 of 24
Thread Starter 
A couple more;



post #5 of 24
very nic views and a great way to start/end each day! Awesome and good for you.
post #6 of 24
Yeah, what they said Good on you
post #7 of 24
way better than traffic now all we need is 10 dollars a gallon to make the country wake up.
post #8 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
way better than traffic now all we need is 10 dollars a gallon to make the country wake up.
Be careful what you wish for....
post #9 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lonnie View Post
Be careful what you wish for....
To quote the words of a president I'll be happy to see leave (and knowing him, the door will hit him on the way out): BRING IT ON!
post #10 of 24
Thread Starter 
Nothing like having an Oil-man with rich friends in the Whitehouse. Now his friends have even more and the rest of us need to get creative.

I don't ride exclusively to save the environment, auto fuel, money or even to get exercise. I ride because I enjoy it and as a consequence, I get the benefit of the other things.

Michael
post #11 of 24
Just the views are enough to lower a persons stress levels. Nice
post #12 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by WILDCAT View Post
I don't ride exclusively to save the environment, auto fuel, money or even to get exercise. I ride because I enjoy it and as a consequence, I get the benefit of the other things.
+1^1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000!!!

My bike takes me places - some practical, some impractical.

I'm a cyclist - 'nuff said.

(Oh yeah - there's that "skee-ing" thing in the snowy months, too.)
post #13 of 24
Very nice scenery for a work commute!

I saw one of these guys this morning. Only third or fourth sighting of a Blue Heron in my three summers of biking to work. Flew along side me for a few seconds as I traveled on a bike trail near the Potomac.
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post #14 of 24
Rode my work commute on a Saturday recently to take some photos.
1. Start
2. about 80% of my 11 mile commute is on a multi-use trail (W&OD)
3. I've passed this place about 500 times in the last three years without stopping, finally sampled their wares after taking this photo. Best sticky buns!
4. overpass for I395, largest traffic artery into DC from VA. I used it for many years myself, but now I can't occasionally help thinking 'SUCKERS' as I pedal over it
5. although all inside Capital Beltway, some parts of the ride are nice and woodsy
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post #15 of 24
6. not exactly John Muir Wilderness, yet this area along Four Mile Run in Alexandria is where I've had all my Blue Heron sightings, including another one this morning.
7. finish
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post #16 of 24

Continuing my rude hijack of Wildcat’s 2008 thread…

Today I took a Saturday urban bike ride to scout out what my new bike commute will be when my office relocates later this year.  Got some touristy shots of Washington DC.

 

I use a bike trail to do the ~12-13 miles from Virginia suburbs to DC line.

Aug2010 070.jpg

 

I saw a Blue Heron with a 6' wing span on Four Mile Run in Arlington, VA about 2 miles from the Potomac River

Aug2010 071.jpg

 

This is Reagan National Airport.  I currently work about 1/2 mile from here and use Metrorail to commute to work except from Apr to Oct when I bike commute about 50% of the time.

Aug2010 072.jpg

 

Crossing the Potomac River on 14th Street Bridge from VA into DC.

Aug2010 080.jpg

 

The Jefferson Memorial is one of my favorite monuments in DC, architectural motif taken from Jefferson's home Monticello.

Aug2010 081.jpg

 

It was one of those days;  one of the nicer Saturday's this summer with moderate temps, low humidity and sunshine

Aug2010 082.jpg

 

Maine Avenue Fish Market in Southwest DC

Aug2010 083.jpg

 

The view up South Capitol Street, Nationals new baseball park is to the right, Capitol Building straight ahead.

Aug2010 085.jpg

 

Soon my work location will be about 1/2 mile from Nationals Park, believe the new distance from home will be about 15 miles each way.  My trusty old beat-up bike in foreground.  My bike quiver is like my ski quiver, one old fart on one old piece of equipment.

Aug2010 087.jpg

post #17 of 24

That's awesome James!

post #18 of 24

It looks wonderful.  Life is too short to get there twice as fast.

post #19 of 24
Thread Starter 

Very nice. its always great to see an old thread come back to life with some outstanding content!

post #20 of 24

 

How do you like the new Shirlington underpasses and have you been across the Wilson Bridge crossing yet?

 

post #21 of 24

The new Shirlington bike trail underpass (under Interstate 395) is GREAT.  I use it all the time and it saves me about one mile of hazardous riding through a busy commercial/residential area. The photo of the bird above was taken a few hundred feet from the underpass.  Haven't been across Wilson Bridge on a bike yet.

 

 

Fun bonus facts you might not know about the Washington Monument: 

Construction started in 1848 and was interrupted for long periods by lack of funding and the Civil War.  At the time of completion in 1884 it was the tallest building in the world at 550 feet, roughly 55 stories.  A few years later it was surpassed by the Eiffel Tower, then many subsequent buildings.  But the Washington Monument remains the world’s tallest completely stone structure. Because of a 1912 building code limiting the height of new construction in DC it is far and away the tallest building in the city and a striking landmark from all vantage points.   The District of Columbia is devoid of a modern city skyline despite an estimated population in the greater metro area of over 5 million. The tallest commercial building within city limits is about 21 stories.

post #22 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

way better than traffic now all we need is 10 dollars a gallon to make the country wake up.


dingbat

post #23 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by stoweguy View Post

 

dingbat


Not "dingbat" at all, really.  The United States has some of the most heavily subsidized oil in the world, which accounts for our comparatively low pump price for gasoline.  If not for the subsidies, the per-gallon cost would approach - if not exceed - $10.

 

And I'm in agreement with BushwackerinPA here: with an artificially-low petrol price, the typical American's mindset will still be "the private automobile rules all."  I remember the sharp drop-off of single-occupancy vehicle use here in the greater DC area in 2008, when the price of crude oil - and thus the price of gasoline - spiked.  That happened to coincide with an increase in bicycle use in the area (which is been on a steady uptick for years), and it was a wonderful time to ride the roads around here.

 

Since then, the price on gasoline has dropped a bit, and more motorists are on the roads again, while the number of cyclists has continued to increase.  The result is two-fold: a gradual increase in money spent on cycling infrastructure, and a gradual increase in the number of incidents between cyclists and motorists.  Unfortunately, cultural habits and behavioral patterns are tough to change in a short period of time, so the transition to a more multi-modal road use (or, bluntly speaking, the return to a multi-model road use - remember that hard pavement was originally used to help cyclists get from point A to point B in a safe manner) will be a bit longer and full of hard landings.

post #24 of 24


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by songfta View Post




Not "dingbat" at all, really.  The United States has some of the most heavily subsidized oil in the world, which accounts for our comparatively low pump price for gasoline.  If not for the subsidies, the per-gallon cost would approach - if not exceed - $10.

 

And I'm in agreement with BushwackerinPA here: with an artificially-low petrol price, the typical American's mindset will still be "the private automobile rules all."  I remember the sharp drop-off of single-occupancy vehicle use here in the greater DC area in 2008, when the price of crude oil - and thus the price of gasoline - spiked.  That happened to coincide with an increase in bicycle use in the area (which is been on a steady uptick for years), and it was a wonderful time to ride the roads around here.

 

Since then, the price on gasoline has dropped a bit, and more motorists are on the roads again, while the number of cyclists has continued to increase.  The result is two-fold: a gradual increase in money spent on cycling infrastructure, and a gradual increase in the number of incidents between cyclists and motorists.  Unfortunately, cultural habits and behavioral patterns are tough to change in a short period of time, so the transition to a more multi-modal road use (or, bluntly speaking, the return to a multi-model road use - remember that hard pavement was originally used to help cyclists get from point A to point B in a safe manner) will be a bit longer and full of hard landings.

 

 

I am very much a car guy, I love driving. but I hate how complactent this place has gotten to be. lowish gas price is one reason.

 

The most milage I put on my car now is to go MTBing, the irony I know. I would be willing to ride to the nearest trailhead though if there was better route or alot less cars. I feel scared on a relativity fast road bike, on my fat tired MTB I feel like a sitting duck on the roads leading to where I MTB.

 

I have great roads to ride on locally, road most people would be envious of really, its just they are lead out into the boonies where there is not MTB trails yet. At least not within reasonable riding distance.

 

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