or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Ask Calvin's Dad

post #1 of 62
Thread Starter 
Some remnants from one of my favorite comic strips:





Q. Why does the sun set?

A. It's because hot air rises. The sun's hot in the middle of the day, so it rises high in the sky. In the evening then, it cools down and sets.

Q. Why does it go from east to west?

A. Solar wind.

Q. Why does the sky turn red as the sun sets?

A. That's all the oxygen in the atmosphere catching fire.

Q. Where does the sun go when it sets?

A. The sun sets in the west. In Arizona actually, near Flagstaff. That's why the rocks there are so red.

Q. Don't the people get burned up?

A. No, the sun goes out as it sets. That's why it's dark at night.

Q. Doesn't the sun crush the whole state as it lands?

A. Ha ha, of course not. Hold a quarter up. See, the sun's just about the same size.

Q. I thought I read that the sun was really big.

A. You can't believe everything you read, I'm afraid.




Q. How come old photographs are always black and white? Didn't they have color film back then?

A. Sure they did. In fact, those old photographs are in color. It's just that the world was black and white then. The world didn't turn color until sometime in the 1930s, and it was pretty grainy color for a while, too.

Q. But then why are old paintings in color?! If the world was black and white, wouldn't artists have painted it that way?

A. Not necessarily. A lot of great artists were insane.

Q. But... But how could they have painted in color anyway? Wouldn't their paints have been shades of gray back then?

A. Of course, but they turned colors like everything else did in the '30s.

Q. So why didn't old black and white photos turn color too?

A. Because they were color pictures of black and white, remember?





Q. Dad, will you explain the theory of relativity to me? I don't understand why time goes slower at great speed.

A. It's because you keep changing time zones. See, if you fly to California, you gain three hours on a five-hour flight, right? So if you go at the speed of light, you gain more time, because it doesn't take as long to get there. Of course, the theory of relativity only works if you're going west.




Q. Why do my eyes shut when I sneeze?

A. If your lids weren't closed, the force of the explosion would blow your eyeballs out and stretch the optic nerve, so your eyes would flop around and you'd have to point them with your hands to see anything.



Q. How do bank machines work?

A. Well, let's say you want 25 dollars. You punch in the amount and behind the machine there's a guy with a printing press who makes the money and sticks it out this slot.

Q. Sort of like the guy who lives up in our garage and opens the door?

A. Exactly.




Q. What causes the wind?

A. Trees sneezing.




Q. Why does ice float?

A. Because it's cold. Ice wants to get warm, so it goes to the top of liquids to be nearer to the sun.

Q. Is that true?

A. Look it up and find out.

Q. I should just look up stuff in the first place.




Q. How come you know so much?

A. It's all in the book you get when you become a father.
post #2 of 62
Calvin's dad was Cliff Claven, but even more ballsy. The man was a genius- only a genius could come up with that much BS off the cuff. I mean, lightbulbs really ARE magic, right?
post #3 of 62
This reminds me of a discussion I had with a calc professor of reasons why hot water freezes faster than cold water. My BS instinct tells me it is cause the molecules in hot water are farther apart due to expansion from being warmer so the cold air can penetrate it at a faster rate. All the magic light bulbs started dimming in the classroom when I said that
post #4 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
This reminds me of a discussion I had with a calc professor of reasons why hot water freezes faster than cold water. My BS instinct tells me it is cause the molecules in hot water are farther apart due to expansion from being warmer so the cold air can penetrate it at a faster rate. All the magic light bulbs started dimming in the classroom when I said that
Huh, I woulda guessed there was only one dim bulb in that room
post #5 of 62
My dad told me it was because the hot water had less air in it. Now I think it is the other way round.
post #6 of 62
For those of you that believe that hot water freezes faster than cold I have a great investment in a bridge you might be interested in. In fact, for a limited time the bridge comes with its own waterfall.

post #7 of 62
Now that I think about it, what I recall is not that it froze faster, but that it made better skating rink ice when it did freeze.

Can anyone else confirm or deny that?
post #8 of 62
Egads!

The cold water freezes faster.

Suppose it takes cold water 20 minutes to freeze.

Then the hot water will take 20 minutes plus whatever time it takes to cool to the same temperature as the cold water.

Hot water is used to make a smooth surface on a skating rink by melting imperfections/ruts.
post #9 of 62
Please turn into a thread about hot water freezing faster... Please turn into a thread about hot water freezing faster... Please turn into a thread about hot water freezing faster...
post #10 of 62
My dad always told me that hot wather pipes freeze before cold water pipes. In our house that was always what happen. I figured that it was because the hot water pipes started out with hot EXPANDED water. As the hot water pipe cooled to freezing point the water contracted. The cntracted hot water pipes just before freezing point was under LESS atmospheric preasure than the cold water pipes. The hot water pipes had more room for the water to expand as it turned into ice.

Turns out I was wrong. Hot water freezes before cold water because

Read>>> http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/physic...hot_water.html
post #11 of 62
I heard because some of the hot water evaporates in the freezer, there is less water left in the ice tray, so what's left freezes faster.
post #12 of 62
Aristotle ...... " .... hence, people who want water to freeze more quickly put it in the sun .. "



Now look at Baha's thingie on the sun.

See? :
post #13 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
Aristotle ...... " .... hence, people who want water to freeze more quickly put it in the sun .. "



Now look at Baha's thingie on the sun.

See? :
No, I don't see. I try to avoid looking directly at the sun and I'll try even harder now that I know Baja's thingie is on there.
post #14 of 62
Looks like Dad was right. Heating the water gets the air (dissolved gas) out of it. With a higher water content and lower air content it's a better conductor and loses heat faster. It may have to cool down first to the temperature of the cool water, but its rate of cooling is faster throughout the cooling.
post #15 of 62
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
No, I don't see. I try to avoid looking directly at the sun and I'll try even harder now that I know Baja's thingie is on there.



Thanks for helping me start my day with a laugh, telerod.
post #16 of 62

Hot Water DOES freeze faster!

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE View Post
Egads!

The cold water freezes faster.

Suppose it takes cold water 20 minutes to freeze.

Then the hot water will take 20 minutes plus whatever time it takes to cool to the same temperature as the cold water.

Hot water is used to make a smooth surface on a skating rink by melting imperfections/ruts.
You'd think that. But, for some odd reason the hot water gets to frozen from the same point the cold started at faster. Here's some support for my allegation:

http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/physic...hot_water.html

http://library.thinkquest.org/C00853...ze/freeze.html

http://blogs.chron.com/sciguy/archiv...hot_water.html

http://physicsworld.com/cws/article/print/24493

to you!
post #17 of 62

Which freezes faster?

So at 10:05 I put two cups of near boiling water and two cups of water from the cold water tap into identical containers and placed them in a very large sub-zero freezer. By 10:35 the water that started out cold had a partial skin of ice where as the water that started out hot did not. At 10:45 I had to break through the ice to determine the temp of the water that started out cold. It was 37 in the center. The water that started out hot was at 56.

I will repeat this experiment tomorrow with slightly stricter controls and more time to observe the results as they freeze more thoroughly. But I'm thinking this myth is busted.

Any suggestions as to what further controls to put in place and what particular observations would be important?
post #18 of 62
If you used ceramic cups, the mass would (of the ceramic), would be a significant factor.

Try light aluminum.

:
post #19 of 62
I used light stainless steel.
post #20 of 62
This is getting better and better.
post #21 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by bumpfreaq View Post
So at 10:05 I put two cups of near boiling water and two cups of water from the cold water tap into identical containers and placed them in a very large sub-zero freezer. By 10:35 the water that started out cold had a partial skin of ice where as the water that started out hot did not. At 10:45 I had to break through the ice to determine the temp of the water that started out cold. It was 37 in the center. The water that started out hot was at 56.

I will repeat this experiment tomorrow with slightly stricter controls and more time to observe the results as they freeze more thoroughly. But I'm thinking this myth is busted.

Any suggestions as to what further controls to put in place and what particular observations would be important?
Oh wait, You're up in Meeeechigeeen. You don't happen to be using a water softener are you?

post #22 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by DoWork View Post
This is getting better and better.
post #23 of 62
C'mon... give it another try! You're almost there! I feel like we're *this* close to discovering the truth behind this age-old mystery wrapped in an enigma, covered by a puzzle and shrouded in secrecy. ::: Please note condiments in fridge and presence of such things as fresh parmesan wedges, hot mustard, banana peppers and spicy BBQ sauce.


I heard that if you do it when the moon is full, it freezes even slower on the top part of the cup because of the gravitational pull of the moon bringing the molecules closer together on that side. : (insert twilight zone music here) I demand scientific exploration of this phenomena and nominate Bump cuz' his frigde is nicer than mine and I keep having to open mine to get more PBRs and bait and the cup keeps getting knocked over. Wow the magic bulbs in the room just dimmed a bit...
post #24 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
Oh wait, You're up in Meeeechigeeen. You don't happen to be using a water softener are you?

It's not well water but it's not all that sick....... er.... I mean it hasn't specifically been through a softener.

I didn't read any of the links you provided until after I did my little experiment, but I'll go with my own imperical evidence over that of experts who post their findings on the net. Ha I guess that makes my findings totally worthless to anyone but me
post #25 of 62
Cooling water down is easy. The hard part is freezing water into a solid. Having any kind of advantage in the actual freezing step could be a real time saver.

calorie: 1 calorie will raise 1 gram of water 1 degree Celsius. If 1 g of water is given 2 calories, its temperature will go up 2 degrees.
Melting ice at 0 degrees Celsius: It takes 80 calories to melt 1 gram of ice. If 1 g of ice (at 0 degrees Celsius) is given 80 calories, it will melt and the final temperature of the water will be 0.

Freezing water at 0 degrees Celsius: It also takes 80 calories to freeze 1 gram of water. If 1 g of water (at 0 degrees Celsius) gives away 80 calories, it will freeze and its final temperature will be 0.

Boiling water at 100 degrees Celsius: 540 calories are needed to turn 1 gram (at 100 degrees Celsius) of water to steam.
post #26 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by DoWork View Post
C'mon... give it another try! You're almost there! I feel like we're *this* close to discovering the truth behind this age-old mystery wrapped in an enigma, covered by a puzzle and shrouded in secrecy. ::: Please note condiments in fridge and presence of such things as fresh parmesan wedges, hot mustard, banana peppers and spicy BBQ sauce. ..................
Wow the magic bulbs in the room just dimmed a bit...
I couldn't agree more. I think we need to lobby the mods to post a $$$$ reward to the first Bear that can succeed and document this phenomenon like Google has the $20,000,000 prize to send a rover to the moon and send back a broadcast...

I second the nomination for bumpfreaq to be our designated Madddd Scientist

BuuuuhhdHa Ha Ha Haaaaahhhhh!
post #27 of 62
Anyone else heard that if you freeze warm water in ice trays it pops out of the ice trays nicer? I think ice sticks to the sides of the ice tray more after freezing cold water..



Careful, I just heard a brown out is spreading across the country...
post #28 of 62
Now conversely, if you put an ice cube in a microwave will it take less time to get to a boil then if you put a cup of hot water in the microwave?
post #29 of 62
^^^Haven't tried the microwave, but I've done the boil cold water vs. hot water........ the hot boils first every time.
post #30 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by catskills View Post
calorie: 1 calorie will raise 1 gram of water 1 degree Celsius. If 1 g of water is given 2 calories, its temperature will go up 2 degrees.
Melting ice at 0 degrees Celsius: It takes 80 calories to melt 1 gram of ice. If 1 g of ice (at 0 degrees Celsius) is given 80 calories, it will melt and the final temperature of the water will be 0.

Freezing water at 0 degrees Celsius: It also takes 80 calories to freeze 1 gram of water. If 1 g of water (at 0 degrees Celsius) gives away 80 calories, it will freeze and its final temperature will be 0.

Boiling water at 100 degrees Celsius: 540 calories are needed to turn 1 gram (at 100 degrees Celsius) of water to steam.
What high calorie food is best to feed the water?

How about... Bacon?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Humour and Fun Stuff