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Single Speed riding.... - Page 2

post #31 of 55
Light, strong and dope as hell. My guess that thing would set you back 10 grand.
post #32 of 55
post #33 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by evansilver View Post
OTOH, I just got the ultimate poser fixie -- a Specialized Langster -- and it is very interesting on flat roads and paths.
I believe that title belongs to the Bianchi Pista, or maybe the Surly Steamroller, complete with aerospoke front wheel, flop 'n' chopped bars (or super skinny ones) and rider wearing skinny jeans with the right cuff rolled way up.

Singlespeeding is fun, I do pretty light singletrack on mine and also use it as a bar/grocery bike - everything is bolted on, so people can't steal my seat! That actually happened to me last fall, I locked my xc bike up in front of a local school to go vote in the municipal election and when I came back, my bike was without a seat and post! It was a nice saddle too!
post #34 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post
Whiteroom, do you have a single speed? If so, whats your suggestion for a good bike/frame to start with?
I'm soft and weak, I am really happy with gears and suspension.

If i did build a SS, I'd build a 29'er fully rigid, like this:

http://ingliscycles.com/bikes/r_t_grey.php
post #35 of 55
I'd build SS cyclocross. Mix two horrible painful forms of cycling into one.
post #36 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
I'd build SS cyclocross. Mix two horrible painful forms of cycling into one.
I've always thought singlespeed would work great for 'cross racing. Any big hills you just run up, no derailluers to get bunged up, no chain to fall off. I've never raced cyclocross, but it seems like it might work. A current trend here is to run a 42t ring with a 9spd mountain cassette and chainguide. It's, er, a challenge to get the chainguide to work, but when it does it seems to work pretty well in the races.
post #37 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
I'm soft and weak, I am really happy with gears and suspension.

If i did build a SS, I'd build a 29'er fully rigid, like this:

http://ingliscycles.com/bikes/r_t_grey.php
That's a beautiful bike. I like the change of pace a SS gives, different riding experience and greater challenge, it makes the usual trails feel new again. But after an hour on my old converted rigid, I feel pretty beat up and wishing for a little suspension.
post #38 of 55
Ahh singlespeeding ...

My current singlespeed race bike is in the picture below (my last race). With a 29er wheel in front and a steel frame it weighs 20.8 lbs. It feels more efficient and responsive than my Gary Fisher Superfly HT 29er, but that does not mean that I am faster on it. I might generally climb better, but you cannot beat gears and suspension for terrain that is rough and varried enough.

But I am no singlespeed or 29er zealot. There are advantages and disadvantages in all types of bike. The trick is to concentrate on the advantages and enjoy the ride.
525x525px-LL-vbattach3493.jpg
post #39 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomB View Post
Ahh singlespeeding ...

My current singlespeed race bike is in the picture below (my last race). With a 29er wheel in front and a steel frame it weighs 20.8 lbs. It feels more efficient and responsive than my Gary Fisher Superfly HT 29er, but that does not mean that I am faster on it. I might generally climb better, but you cannot beat gears and suspension for terrain that is rough and varried enough.

But I am no singlespeed or 29er zealot. There are advantages and disadvantages in all types of bike. The trick is to concentrate on the advantages and enjoy the ride.
Thats a nice looking SS with 20lbs is good for steel, carbon fork and discs.
post #40 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
If your a spinner I would suggest a single speed at all. wouldnt fit how you ride.

I wouldnt call myself a 'single speeder' at all, I like to MTB. Is a high end single speed superior to high end gear biked(hardtail or FS) on trail, while has epic pointed out no, or people would be using them. Also remember that high end XC racers are quite often as close to roadie as you get in MTBing.

Let not talk about high end here, let talk about 300-600 dollars. I would be willing to bet for most strong riders out there in that price range a SS would be a much faster than geared bike.

telerod and evansilver a geared bike made to be single speed isnt the same, the sub 100 dollar bike I helped lonnie build that I have been borrowing weighs 20 lb. My geared trance weighs 26lb even though that light for a FS bike it stills feel very heavy compare to ghetto single speed.

On rides i would want my short travel geared bike over a Single Speed, yes there are some of them, I would probably allways keep a geared bike in my stable just because on longer rides it give you the ability to not have to push the whole time. Also even my puny 4inch travel trail bike is still fast downhill than most hardtail SS.
I agree with you, a nice SS sells for less than a similarly speced geared bike all else being equal. And if you have an old beater HT it is easy to turn it into a SS for next to nothing. I think part of the reason that highend MTBs and SS don't mix is because the SS riding style you are out of the saddle 75% of the time and that really calls for a hardtail, maybe even a rigid.

I rode my trek HT as a SS for about 3 weeks. I would recommend a tensioner if you don't have a SS compatible frame. The half link option and magic gears don't seem to work well in practice. It was really fun to try a different style of riding. Gearing makes a big difference in what I can climb. After a 10mile ride with 500ft climbing on that SS some times felt like I had just done an epic ride.

I really liked the chain line and simplicity of the SS, but I couldn't settle on a gearing option that worked for me in the trails I like to ride and also worked for commuting. So I ended up returning it to a 1X8.

Even though it tired me out, I am not convinced that the SS riding offers improved fitness training over a geared bike. I think the SS tends to push me anaerobic too frequently while on a geared bike I can adjust to keep just from going anarobic (unless I want to) and there by continue riding in whatever training level I am going for longer. Another thing I have been working on is making sure I stay on the bike at all times to train my muscles to recover while still on the bike instead of by stopping to rest, also easier with gears. I think the things that SS does teach is an aggressive riding style and attitude that you have to push hard on climbs and maintain that cadence because if you slow down on a SS, you stop.
post #41 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post
I think the things that SS does teach is an aggressive riding style and attitude that you have to push hard on climbs and maintain that cadence because if you slow down on a SS, you stop.
Agreed. I think this ^^ has alot to do with the appeal of singlespeeding to me.

I ride SS so much because my local trails ("local" meaing most of the stuff in a 20 minute drive my front door), got really boring to me on my usual geared bikes. They're mainly smooth lightly-technical singletrack...with some hills, but mainly rolling, but not too much in the way of sustained climbing. Hopping on a singlespeed really made these local trails fun to me again, and now that I've gotten stronger, I find myself taking my SS to more trails outide of my local area. Or when the local trails get too easy, I put a smaller cog on the back to make it harder again (i.e. started in a 2:1 ratio (32:16 26" tires), but now ride a 32:15 everywhere, and have just started doing my local races in a 32:14 with success).

I just have more fun on my SS. But I never say it is better than any other bike. Riding any kind of bike is fun. Ride whatchoo want and share a beer at the end of the ride.

I do ask one of thing of gearies though...if you're coming up on a hill and you know that there is a SS-er behind you, if you're not going to charge up that hill in a faster gear and you're just going to sit and spin, please let the SS-er by so we can carry our momentum up the hill and charge up it. There's nothing more frustrating than getting stuck behind a gearie sitting and spinning up a singletrack hill in granny gear when you could be flying up the thing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
FWIW - I also don't "get" baggy shorts and army color everything. Or flat pedals. Maybe I'm just getting old.
ha...I'm the opposite. I never 'got' spandex in mountain biking. I'll wear it from time to time if I'm racing or if I'm on a road ride, but not for just regular trail riding.
post #42 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post
I ride SS so much because my local trails ("local" meaing most of the stuff in a 20 minute drive my front door), got really boring to me on my usual geared bikes. They're mainly smooth lightly-technical singletrack...with some hills, but mainly rolling, but not too much in the way of sustained climbing. Hopping on a singlespeed really made these local trails fun to me again, and now that I've gotten stronger, I find myself taking my SS to more trails outide of my local area.
That's part of what drew me, too. I'm finding that it's a totally different riding style. I've always been a sit-n-spin-er and my favorite saying has been "I paid for all 27 gears and darn it, I'm gonna use every single one!". Then I got the bug to convert a hardtail to a SS. I like it so much, I ride it 90% of the time. I even go to our most technical trails with it. I find I'm carrying more speed into and out of corners, on the downhills, and even into the uphills. I'm finally comfortable standing and hammering up said hills. I think it's made me a much more aggressive, stronger, and more versatile rider.
Quote:
but now ride a 32:15 everywhere, and have just started doing my local races in a 32:14 with success).
I've been running 32/15 on mine since I started. I tried going 32/14, but it's still too much gear for me to push on the techincal stuff. I can't make it go and still maintain traction and balance.

Quote:
I just have more fun on my SS. But I never say it is better than any other bike. Riding any kind of bike is fun. Ride whatchoo want and share a beer at the end of the ride.
Amen, brother. It's just FUN!
(And NO, just not shifting a geared bike is NOT the same thing!!!!! You really gotta try the real deal and give it a couple of rides on a well known trail before you decide).
post #43 of 55
Why make a difficult activity harder? Sounds like telemark! Haha, 'makes easy local trails fun again' rang a bell.

I still believe the time I waited a few weeks to replace a snapped rear gear cable was a close enough approximation for me to know SS is not my cup of tea.

You need to be very strong to ride SS off-road, and people who can should be proud. The fact that it forces you to carry speed doesn't mean you can't carry speed and stomp up hills on a geared bike. VG, although you say it is totally different style, you seem to suggest that SS has changed how you ride. Do you ride your geared bikes faster and more aggressively after riding SS?
post #44 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
Why make a difficult activity harder? Sounds like telemark! Haha, 'makes easy local trails fun again' rang a bell.
Wanna start a unicross league?

Quote:
Do you ride your geared bikes faster and more aggressively after riding SS
No. I pedal squares and delay shifts. The only thing possibly faster is turn setup and entry.
post #45 of 55
volklgirl: I've been running 32/15 on mine since I started. I tried going 32/14, but it's still too much gear for me to push on the techincal stuff. I can't make it go and still maintain traction and balance.

Here in Ontario you would not make many climbs with that gearing. The very best in our singlespeed class use 32:16 for most races (32:18 on a 29er). And the very best are riders that moved from the Expert category to Singlespeed. Our Singlespeed class is OPEN.

I generally race 32:18, but will go with 32:17 occasionally.
post #46 of 55
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomB View Post
volklgirl: I've been running 32/15 on mine since I started. I tried going 32/14, but it's still too much gear for me to push on the techincal stuff. I can't make it go and still maintain traction and balance.

Here in Ontario you would not make many climbs with that gearing. The very best in our singlespeed class use 32:16 for most races (32:18 on a 29er). And the very best are riders that moved from the Expert category to Singlespeed. Our Singlespeed class is OPEN.

I generally race 32:18, but will go with 32:17 occasionally.
The bike i am using has 30 - 17(it will eventually go 30-16 or 15) utah has alot steeper climbing than most other places. In Pa I could easily run 30-15 or 30-14.

also my geared bike riding is getting faster not sure if its from the SS or jsut from riding so much, but I would liek to think that some of that is from momentum conservation that SS teaches you.
post #47 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by volklgirl View Post

I've been running 32/15 on mine since I started. I tried going 32/14, but it's still too much gear for me to push on the techincal stuff. I can't make it go and still maintain traction and balance.
niiice.

I'm still experimenting with 32/14 on my local rolling trails. For anything with sustained climbing, I'd put a larger cog on the back, but on the right trail....it is faaaaaaast. It helped me to my first, first place finish in my sport single speed class at my local racing series in the last race of the season which they set up as a mostly flat, but fast, course with high-speed swooping turns. (for the fall series I will now have the pleasure of racing in the expert class...*gulp*).

Aside from the obvious disadvantages of being harder to grind up steeper or sustained climbs with a 14T, one other drawback I've noticed is that I don't think it allows me to accelerate out of corners in tight twisty singletrack as fast as I can with a 15T. Maybe it's just my perception, but it sure feels that way. I'll keep it on there for a few more months though and see if I can get stronger with it.

Also, I'm very stoked that I just got a new SS specific rear hub. A Hope Pro II SS laced to some Mavic 717 rims. The engagement is amazing and dang this sucker is LOUD!
post #48 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
You need to be very strong to ride SS off-road, and people who can should be proud. The fact that it forces you to carry speed doesn't mean you can't carry speed and stomp up hills on a geared bike. VG, although you say it is totally different style, you seem to suggest that SS has changed how you ride. Do you ride your geared bikes faster and more aggressively after riding SS?
Oh, absolutely. I'm even standing up and hammering on the FS now (with limited success however ). I find that when I ride the HT or FS, I just plain forget that I CAN shift, so I don't as much anymore.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post
harder to grind up steeper or sustained climbs with a 14T, one other drawback I've noticed is that I don't think it allows me to accelerate out of corners in tight twisty singletrack as fast as I can with a 15T. Maybe it's just my perception, but it sure feels that way. I'll keep it on there for a few more months though and see if I can get stronger with it.
It felt that way for me too. I figured that I already walk certain hills, so bigger gearing for the flats would be faster while I'll still be walking the same hills. Somehow, it just didn't work out that way. Besides the longer and really steep or rooty hills, I found that where I suffered with that 14t was on the technical stuff (logs, rock gardens, ladders, bridges). Instead of being able to smoothly pedal out if I got in trouble, I found myself struggling, trying to stand, losing my balance, and losing traction then crashing every time. : Besides, it just felt slower.

Quote:
Also, I'm very stoked that I just got a new SS specific rear hub. A Hope Pro II SS laced to some Mavic 717 rims. The engagement is amazing and dang this sucker is LOUD!
Sweet
post #49 of 55
Ah, Single speeds/ Track bikes....

I got my track bike ready for a road ride yesterday, and it was fun until the first big hill.......not on the uphill, but on the other side, barrelling downhill at 55mph+ without brakes.....
You got to have big cojones, but you can brake if you know what to do...lift upwards hard on the pedals and press back trying to stop the pedals rotating.....a good way to break the chain!

You can even get the back wheel to skid! this should be fun on gravel!!

I ride a 38/15, exactly the setup when I rode in velodromes and in the Pan American Games for Canada....about 150 years ago

My bike is a vintage steel BSA (British Small Arms) with cotter pins and sturdy everything.....BSA also made motorbikes and guns...

However in the S.F. bay area the hills are too steep for long rides, my driveway is a 10% slope for 350 feet, but I do enjoy blowing by dudes in their $3000 carbon fiber Treks on the FLATS...

Just a few thoughts on a different kind of experience....but riding is the main focus...

Neil
post #50 of 55
So you were going 55 MPH on a 38/15 fixed? How many rpm is that?
post #51 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
So you were going 55 MPH on a 38/15 fixed? How many rpm is that?
Analytic sez: 272 with 27" wheels; 180 rpm gets you to 38mph, still way impressive.
post #52 of 55
Fixed, 272 rpm, 55 mph?

Must be a joke, right?
post #53 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by nfp158 View Post

My bike is a vintage steel BSA (British Small Arms) with cotter pins and sturdy everything.....BSA also made motorbikes and guns...
Post up a pic please!!
post #54 of 55
Don't know how to post pix on this site...

Oops, I put a new battery in my bike cyclocomputer and forgot to convert to mph....

So it's 55 kilometers/hr....big difference!....

nfp158
post #55 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by nfp158 View Post
Don't know how to post pix on this site...
this might help you out -> http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=41472
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