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Animal encounters while riding? - Page 2

post #31 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ View Post
Towpath ?? Would that be a canal tow path ??
Yup - the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal Towpath, to be specific.
post #32 of 45
I was riding a singletrack in Indonesia when a big cobra came down the bank. I scooted ahead of it, while the lady behind be ejected off her bike backwards. The cobra stood up, flared it's hood, and continued on it's way.
post #33 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post
I was riding a singletrack in Indonesia when a big cobra came down the bank. I scooted ahead of it, while the lady behind be ejected off her bike backwards. The cobra stood up, flared it's hood, and continued on it's way.
Okay, I would have lost it completely. I'm really not a fan of snakes and freak out if I even think I hear a rattler around here, the cobra would have sent me over the edge.

Thankfully the most I've seen is a small garden snake, a rattler across the street and lots of deer, fox, prairie dogs and bunnies.
post #34 of 45
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post
I was riding a singletrack in Indonesia when a big cobra came down the bank. I scooted ahead of it, while the lady behind be ejected off her bike backwards. The cobra stood up, flared it's hood, and continued on it's way.
I would have peed myself if I saw a cobra... Wow.
post #35 of 45

Durango man encounters mountain lion

(This was right adjacent to town, where the city fireworks get launched every year.)

Durango Herald article

Quote:
Meeting occurred on Spirit Trail on Tuesday evening
July 9, 2008By Karen Boush | Herald Staff Writer

A mountain biker met up with a mountain lion yesterday in the test tracks area of Durango Mountain Park, but after a brief, uneventful encounter the two went their separate ways.

David Tabar, a systems manager with the The Durango Herald, was approaching the end of the Spirit Trail by Greenmount Cemetery at about 7:15 p.m. when he came face to face with the lion.

"I spotted this mountain lion in the trail about 10 feet ahead of me, so I stopped," he said. "We just kind of stared at each other for maybe 15 seconds."

Tabar said the cat then moved off the trail and about 20 feet away in a flanking motion before turning around and looking at him again.

"At that point, I decided I would just kind of slowly pedal away," he said, adding that he kept looking back as he traveled the trail's last quarter mile, but did not spot the cat again.

Tabar, who said he has never seen a free-ranging mountain lion before, described the cat as "surprised and jumpy," but not aggressive. He also said that it had dark markings around its eyes and nose and was between 2½ to 3½ feet tall.


"He was smaller than I would have expected a full-grown mountain lion to be but he was definitely bigger than a bobcat," he said.

Tabar often rides in the test tracks area. Tabar said the experience of meeting up with a mountain lion won't stop him from returning.

"I just thought that it was really neat. I'm kind of honored that I saw a mountain lion," he said.
Quote:
Precautions
Although mountain lions generally avoid people, they can be dangerous and deadly. Wildlife experts provide the following guidelines to help you protect yourself from mountain lion encounters and conflicts while recreating or exercising outdoors:

• Trail runners, hikers and mountain bikers should run or ride with others.

• Carry a deterrent, such as a walking stick. Avoid activity at dawn or dusk.

• Solitary individuals - especially those younger than 16 - are more likely to sustain an attack than are multiple people.

• If you encounter a mountain lion, watch the lion and focus on its feet, yell, show your teeth, move backwards slowly, throw rocks or sticks, but do not bend down or crouch. Raise your arms over head to appear large. If you are wearing a jacket, grab the corners, and lift it over your back like wings to appear larger. If approached, be aggressive; do not turn your back on the animal. Never run away.

Source: WildEarth Guardians
post #36 of 45
This hits home for me:
http://www.adn.com/bearattacks/story/450061.html
http://www.adn.com/news/alaska/wildl...ry/451700.html
Petra is an incredibly cool and athletic young woman, and a great skier as well. Her mom is a former NCAA All-American alpine skier and coach for the Alyeska Ski Club. She's making great progress, but it's going to be a long road towards recovery.

I myself have dealt with several black bears and a juvenile brown (still big enough for me to soil my shorts) on my morning road bike commute. Moose can be an issue when you're on a 5' wide twisting bike trail going 20 MPH. Still, I feel lucky to have avoided the situation Petra finds herself in. I've ridden (and skied) those trails many times in a complete exhaustion-induced haze, and probably wouldn't have noticed a bear until I was riding up its back.
post #37 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post
http://www.rockymountainnews.com/new...oulder-county/

In case the link goes dead:

Wow! I've had a bear run across the road in front of me while I was riding, and I've run into a chipmunk (doesn't really compare in terms of impact to a bear). Anybody have any "close encounters" with critters while riding that they want to share?
Whoa! Old Stage is a fairly steep ascent/descent. Hitting a bear descending Old Stage at 45 mph - ouch!


A few years back, we were in Custer State Park and I decided to ride the Wildlife Loop from the Bluebell Lodges. As I approached the loop entrance, there were two park rangers sitting there having a chat. I asked if it was okay to ride my bike on the loop. They looked at each other and then at me and one said, "Um, yea. But, the buffalo are out and about. If you see any, be sure to wait for an auto and then pass with the auto on the opposite side of the buffalo." I said, "Okay". Well, I saw one buffalo all by himself on my 1st descent and he never even look up as I passed him. Buffalo, ha! Whatever. Later into the ride I saw a bunch of autos stopped and people were watching at the herd of buffalo that were in the grass on each side of the road. There was one really big one IN the road and I figured that I'd just ride past him like I did the other. So, I start making my way towards him - slowly - everybody watching as the idiot on a road bike goes to pass a male buffalo in a herd. I must have gotten within about 20 yards from this huge animal when he notices that I'm coming his way. He quickly turned towards me and started to chase - but not at full speed. More of a warning chace I guess. I nearly shit my lycra when this happened. He could have easily run me down had he wanted to, but as soon as I turned and headed back as fast as I could he slowed and came to a stop. I kept going until I reached the 1st large RV that I could hide behind. The RV owner said he was bummed because he had just put away his camcorder.
post #38 of 45
Here's one. Different kind of animal - http://www.velonews.com/article/7977...ling-community
post #39 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
Here's one. Different kind of animal - http://www.velonews.com/article/7977...ling-community

And a more political one: http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0708/11985.html
post #40 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
Here's one. Different kind of animal - http://www.velonews.com/article/7977...ling-community

And a more political one: http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0708/11985.html
post #41 of 45
This guy (or gal) is just hanging out 200 yards from here:



Seems mellow enough, but definitely a little spooky checking him out while only on a bike. :


Saw a big brown bear doing his thing two weeks ago while hiking up by the Wilsons.
post #42 of 45

....

Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
If i was riding the southeast i would not want to happen upon one of these escaped feral pigs...

If riders don't watch-out-for/yield-to...young wildlife(bear, moose) with adults nearby, both can do just as much damage to you than a pig/boar...REGARDLESS of shear size!.....ROTFL..

Alpinord...remember, black bears(very often the more social bear...do come in varying shades of brown as well) can climb a tree, a grizzly can't...

$.01
post #43 of 45
I'm not entirely sure how to differentiate them, but the one near the Wilson's was in fact black with a large brown patch, while this one above was entirely brown. A function of age?

Sad thing though, it was definitely not well and old. After a few days, the DOW came out and tried coaxing it to no avail and ended up shooting it dead and it dropped the 30 feet from the branch. Not fun to witness while working on a bike in the shop/carport.
post #44 of 45
A few years back Mrs. Zoo and I did a tour at Yosemite. We asked what type of bears were in Yosemite. The Rangers reply was, the bears are black, bleached brown, by the sun.

Nice shot on the Kitty. Was your heart racing? Mine sure was when I saw one.
post #45 of 45
This guy was listless and was only a little bit of a concern. I was more concerned about the one while hiking and my kid was out in front a bit of my wife and I. :

Before winching the bear onto the truck, the vet gave my son some of the bear's fur which was light brown/blond when he went over to check it out and take some pictures.
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