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Talk me down? - Page 2

post #31 of 50
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobatt View Post
Yep
Yep
Nope
Yep
Yep
You're dissing the FS bike? Too bad, cause I just got one! I love it, I think it's great fun to ride, the suspension makes me smile. It basically forgives all the bonehead stupid beginner things I'm doing (AUGH! ROOT!) and only dumps me off when I fail to climb fast enough.

I don't get fixies. They seem an exercise in masochism...punishment for your manifold sins...
post #32 of 50
I don't have a fullie xc bike because I'm a hardtail guy. I don't dig on the sit-n-spin type climbing, letting the suspension suck up the bumps, and I like the responsiveness I can get on my hardtail. That's not to say there aren't fullies that are as responsive as a hardtail, your Specialized is close to, if not as responsive as a hardtail, but I'm kinda cheap and with the limited amount of xc riding I do it would be silly to have 2 bikes for one category. Kinda like owning 2 sets of powder skis when you only really ski inbounds in the East.

Now, fixies are fun. It really challenges your bike control techniques, especially at slow speeds. I've tried a few days at the local velodrome and I think I'm getting a track bike after I get the freeride rig paid for.
post #33 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobatt View Post
I don't have a fullie xc bike because I'm a hardtail guy. I don't dig on the sit-n-spin type climbing, letting the suspension suck up the bumps, and I like the responsiveness I can get on my hardtail. That's not to say there aren't fullies that are as responsive as a hardtail, your Specialized is close to, if not as responsive as a hardtail, but I'm kinda cheap and with the limited amount of xc riding I do it would be silly to have 2 bikes for one category. Kinda like owning 2 sets of powder skis when you only really ski inbounds in the East.

Now, fixies are fun. It really challenges your bike control techniques, especially at slow speeds. I've tried a few days at the local velodrome and I think I'm getting a track bike after I get the freeride rig paid for.
the funny thing is some XC teams force their rider to ride fullie's because in testing even on er course they were faster, despite the riders thinking they were slower.

although my next MTB(currently looking for a 'project") will most likely be a steel SS disc brake hardtail to have something different and that will ride when the FS bike breakes. Plus riding lonnie 'ghetto' bike has made me think of MTB as really simple sport. On SS all you have to do is pedal harder and it seems to make it up any hill nad accelration out of tight corners is crazy fast.

acrophobia you dont have to spend thousands of dollars on bike to have each. For instance a SS mountain bike could be made with quality parts for a couple hundred dollars if you know how to shop/barter which is half the fun.
post #34 of 50
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
acrophobia you dont have to spend thousands of dollars on bike to have each. For instance a SS mountain bike could be made with quality parts for a couple hundred dollars if you know how to shop/barter which is half the fun.
It occurs to me that 2008 has been the Year of Acrophobia Doing Stuff She Sucks At. I mean, for example...

Skiing - I've progressed from total suckage to having a better understanding why I suck.

Skating - never put inline skates on prior to about six weeks ago. I'm still a beginner. But I've "progressed" from Beginner 1 to Beginner 4 classes, so go me! My one-foot glide still sucketh mightily.

Mountain biking - Will be going on my third ever mountain bike ride in my life on Thursday. How much do I suck? I walk my bike over little itty bitty tiny roots and still manage to fall off.

And you know what - it's been fun. Cause when you're falling on your arse, you really can't take yourself too seriously. Or anything seriously. Life's irritations seem to just melt away.

That said, I would like to work on the mountain biking and the skating, and at least get to a point of not-quite-so-tremendous suckage. The road bike is something I can use for improving all-around endurance. But if I expand the stable much more than that, I fear I'll wind up with a bunch of bikes I can't ride!
post #35 of 50
You go girl! Not surprised that the Ruby felt that good. I say just go for it. If you feel like you just have to try something else, check out a Giant TCR Advanced. If you can, check out a Time VXRS too. :

Then you can start looking for a DH bike.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Acrophobia View Post
I compared the Felt FW2 to the Specialized Ruby Pro today, head-to-head on the same course. The Felt was...twitchy? I felt a little uncertain on it. It was fine in the flats. Climbed with excellent power on an ~8% grade. Felt nervous on descents. I feathered the brake down the hill and shifted my weight back. I didn't do a screech stop. I felt like I was fighting the bike.

The Ruby felt stiff stiff stiff, yet ate all the road vibration. It wanted to accelerate with the slightest touch to the pedals. I did the same climb as I did on the Felt, and thought to myself, "This isn't really a fair test, my legs are tired, I'm not going to be able to climb as well..." And then I looked up. I'd made it to the top of the hill, with what seemed like LESS effort than before. On the descent I powered down and felt rock solid stable.

Both bikes were of comparable weight, with similar components. It's sort of amazing to me that I, of all people, could actually tell the difference.

I'm going to try the S-works Ruby next. And then the WSD Trek Madone. Hey, you only live once, right? If I don't buy a bike like that now, I probably never will. It's extravagant, but...

...I rode my little commuter to work today, and then to the LBS, and then back home again, and I was smiling all day. Bicycles make everything good.
post #36 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acrophobia View Post


I'm guessing you own a bike store. Or if you don't - you should!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobatt View Post
And I do work at a shop

I don't but I LOVE my bikes!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobatt View Post
Not a full DH race bike, but it might be pressed into service as one, ordered today (http://www.norco.com/bikes/mountain/...te/six_two.php)
if a BMX counts, then yes.
SWEET!!!
Yes
post #37 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acrophobia View Post
That said, I would like to work on the mountain biking and the skating, and at least get to a point of not-quite-so-tremendous suckage. The road bike is something I can use for improving all-around endurance.

Don't forget, strength makes for endurance but not the other way 'round.


(note to self to fix up Schwinn Twinn)
post #38 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
You go girl! Not surprised that the Ruby felt that good. I say just go for it. If you feel like you just have to try something else, check out a Giant TCR Advanced. If you can, check out a Time VXRS too. :

Then you can start looking for a DH bike.
I'd look at a Cannondale Synapse Feminine too, I really like Cannondale's road bikes, moreso than Specialized. Or, if you're looking for more bike at lesser cost, look into Kona's budding road line, like the Lisa Rd or higher end. Kona road bikes still haven't made a name for themselves, so you can get a better parts kit for less than what you'd pay from a better known road brand. Ryan Correy just rode a Kona in the Race Across America solo http://www.ryansdream.com/
post #39 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by volklgirl View Post

I don't but I LOVE my bikes!


SWEET!!!
Yes
I'm gonna swap the DHX air out for a DHX coil, for better small bump sensitivity, and it's easier to get a spring for my 225lbs rather than maxing out the air can. Probably pull off the left shifter, small ring and derailler and add a full chainguide as well. Make it a little more freeride, a little less all mountain. I'll probably just shuttle with it anyway. I'm pumped for it.
post #40 of 50
Thread Starter 
The Felt FW2 is a great deal in terms of components - Dura-Ace and Ultegra. My inexpensive aluminum commuter bike is a Felt, and it's got a carbon fork and Shimano 105.

But the difference in ride between the FW2 and the Ruby was pretty amazing. I looked up the Cannondale Synapse, and I like the geometry. Might have to check it out if I can find one to test ride.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobatt View Post
I'd look at a Cannondale Synapse Feminine too, I really like Cannondale's road bikes, moreso than Specialized. Or, if you're looking for more bike at lesser cost, look into Kona's budding road line, like the Lisa Rd or higher end. Kona road bikes still haven't made a name for themselves, so you can get a better parts kit for less than what you'd pay from a better known road brand. Ryan Correy just rode a Kona in the Race Across America solo http://www.ryansdream.com/
post #41 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acrophobia View Post
But the difference in ride between the FW2 and the Ruby was pretty amazing.
That's what matters.
post #42 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
That's what matters.
Quoted for truth.

You can always upgrade components when they wear out or break, but if you have a frame that doesn't feel right to you, it'll never be as good to ride as one that fits, no matter what the components.
post #43 of 50
Thread Starter 
I tried to test-ride the Cannondale Synapse Fem. As I'd mentioned, it has good geometry, i.e. short top tube yet relatively long wheelbase.

I went to a pretty nice store. In addition to Cannondale, they stock Colnago, BMC, and Bianchi.

They had a wall full of Synapses. But one and only one WSD bike. The Synapse 5, with Shimano 105. And it was too small. Heck, I could get that bike at REI, no need for a specialty bike shop.

Whereas the other bike store carried, in stock, several sizes of the Ruby Pro AND the WSD Ruby S-Works. It's nice to find a bike shop where female riders aren't an afterthought.
post #44 of 50
FWIW - google Sky Yaeger. She used to be the product manager at Bianchi and totally does not believe in WSD bikes. She says look for the top tube length you need. A "WSD" sticker and pink paint aren't what will make it work for you. Besides, the best bikes are celeste anyway.

My personal opinion is that WSD is cool only if it gets more women on bikes and if the perception is there that it is needed, then they may as well offer it.
post #45 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acrophobia View Post
It occurs to me that 2008 has been the Year of Acrophobia Doing Stuff She Sucks At. I mean, for example...

Skiing - I've progressed from total suckage to having a better understanding why I suck.

Skating - never put inline skates on prior to about six weeks ago. I'm still a beginner. But I've "progressed" from Beginner 1 to Beginner 4 classes, so go me! My one-foot glide still sucketh mightily.

Mountain biking - Will be going on my third ever mountain bike ride in my life on Thursday. How much do I suck? I walk my bike over little itty bitty tiny roots and still manage to fall off.

And you know what - it's been fun. Cause when you're falling on your arse, you really can't take yourself too seriously. Or anything seriously. Life's irritations seem to just melt away.

That said, I would like to work on the mountain biking and the skating, and at least get to a point of not-quite-so-tremendous suckage. The road bike is something I can use for improving all-around endurance. But if I expand the stable much more than that, I fear I'll wind up with a bunch of bikes I can't ride!
You must be in the same school of Weems, with a goal to "suck at a higher level"
Its a good goal to have!
post #46 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
FWIW - google Sky Yaeger. She used to be the product manager at Bianchi and totally does not believe in WSD bikes. She says look for the top tube length you need. A "WSD" sticker and pink paint aren't what will make it work for you. Besides, the best bikes are celeste anyway.

My personal opinion is that WSD is cool only if it gets more women on bikes and if the perception is there that it is needed, then they may as well offer it.
I see it more as a product marketing structure:

UD- 53-58cm sales subsidise the rest of the frame size run based on sales volume

WSD - 50-53cm sales subsidise the 45-48cm frame sizes based on design ease and cheaper 700c parts.

Anyone remember the Nishikis with 24 inch front wheels & 700 rears that came out way before G. Terry ever built a bike? I'm thinking that the UCI did shorter riders no favors at all by insisting on double diamond geometry for racing instead of funny bikes.
post #47 of 50
Thread Starter 
No, I don't think true WSD bikes are just a marketing gimmick. It's true that some "WSD" bikes have the same geometry, just smaller with a women's saddle, smaller handlebars, etc.

However, I've found that most non-WSD bikes, if the TT length is correct, other dimensions of the bike are too small, which affects the handling and stability.
post #48 of 50
Acrophobia, do you get Kuota out your way? Deff worth a look-excellent rides.
post #49 of 50
Let's not forget the value a Cyclocross bike adds to your stable as well! I have a sweet rolling 12 mile road ride to a State park filled with some nice fire road and single track- about an 8 mile loop's worth then back home on the road. It's be best of both worlds!! (And makes a nice commuter as well)
:

I have a hardtail Mountain, Cross and road- all fairly pricey, but each well worth it.
post #50 of 50
Thread Starter 
Cyclocross! Oh man...

Unfortunately further bike acquisition is on hold until I get my knees sorted out.
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