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The time crunch - Page 2

post #31 of 40

Hands on teaching is a shortcut to deal with the time crunch

Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
With few exceptions I will not touch my clients, meaning I won't do things like skiing backwards in a wedge to keep them from flying down the hill. I want them ready to do it al on thier own. I want hem to ski offensively from day one and if I rush them, that may not happen.
I understand and respect this teaching approach. I've seen highly skilled and successful pros use this approach. Nonetheless I'm a firm believer in "hands on teaching" as one tactic that belongs in my bag of tricks and I teach it to new pros as an option for them to consider. I use "hands on" when other teaching techniques fail, even as early as when doing boot drills (e.g. physically moving their boots into the desired position). I often use hands on teaching to help the weakest group members keep up with the group. For example, one person may not be ready to get off the lift unassisted when the rest are ready. By riding up with that person and assisting them to stay upright when exiting the lift, the other group members do not get bored or tired hiking the base area. The other consideration is mileage. If "hands on" can enable mileage, mileage can solve problems faster than more flat runs can. Hands on can also be a remarkably efficient method of resolving fear issues. I've had many students lose their fear of "offensive" skiing because they could see that I was right there in front of them to stop them if they lost control.

The secrets to hands on teaching are using contact at the points where movements need to be made (e.g. grabbing the boots in the middle to steer into wedges instead of holding the ski tips), using the least amount of contact possible (e.g. helping versus forcing) and reducing the force of contact as performance improves (e.g. transitioning from holding the boots to holding the tips or providing less and less help in either frequency or intensity).

There are lots of examples of "hands on" teaching (or training aids) in other sports. I've experienced this on the recieving side in my golf lessons from different pros and seen it from the top teaching pros on TV. I've also seen and personally experienced hands on teaching failures. Like all tools, it has its pros and cons.
post #32 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
I guess it depends on the layout of your mountain, but I don't think that "getting them on the lift" is that important. I go by the theory that an extra hour on the magic carpet never hurt anyone ....
Depends on the layout - exactly! Almost.

A magic carpet is a "lift" the same way a rope tow or a T bar is a "lift". We all agree that getting them on "a" lift is essential to the perception of success for most first time lessons.

At my mountain, the beginner run with the magic carpet is actually steeper than the beginner trail we use for most first time lessons. The magic carpet run also has no flat run out at the bottom. It's ok for runaway kids to crash into the fabric fencing we use, but our magic carpet run is generally not the best teaching area for non-kid first time lessons.
post #33 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ View Post
One hour lessons demand more of the instructor to provide value in the time allotted. I don't prefer them but see them as a challenge to present an effective lesson.
The cool thing about this challenge is that it actually helps you to deliver a better lesson.
post #34 of 40
A good solution to this problem is to have media (books, dvd's, etc) that the students can refer to outside of the lesson. There is a very good ski instructional system that has been using this approach for over 10 years.
post #35 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by MilesB View Post
A good solution to this problem is to have media (books, dvd's, etc) that the students can refer to outside of the lesson. There is a very good ski instructional system that has been using this approach for over 10 years.
Instructional associations that have been around much longer have many resources to refer students towards too ,including the ones you imply.
There are many great books that have been written . Read them all if you will but nothing will replace on snow instruction.

Motivation to learn all you can and be open to new ideas is not as prevelant as it should be or more people could learn at a much faster pace.
post #36 of 40

Why?

So Rick, what was the point of this thread? Is it a stealth marketing promotion for your new DVDs mentioned here -
http://web.mac.com/rickschnellmann/Your ... ssons.html


If so, that's cool. I must say that in the past eight months or so I have paid little to no attention to EPIC. Now that I have read some threads, I see you have changed your tune and become less tolerant. I may be wrong, if I am, sorry.

JR
post #37 of 40
The link above took me to an error page. Nevermind, found the correct link:

http://web.mac.com/rickschnellmann/Y...i_Lessons.html
post #38 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bolter View Post
So Rick, what was the point of this thread? Is it a stealth marketing promotion for your new DVDs mentioned here -
http://web.mac.com/rickschnellmann/Your ... ssons.html
I didn't see the thread that way at all, and never saw that link until you posted it. Are you doing viral marketing for Rick? :
post #39 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bolter View Post
So Rick, what was the point of this thread? Is it a stealth marketing promotion for your new DVDs mentioned here -
http://web.mac.com/rickschnellmann/Your ... ssons.html


If so, that's cool. I must say that in the past eight months or so I have paid little to no attention to EPIC. Now that I have read some threads, I see you have changed your tune and become less tolerant. I may be wrong, if I am, sorry.

JR
Hi, Bolter. Actually, this thead was started at the request of a member of Epicski. She PM'd me to suggest I start a thread on different teaching techniques. Her hope was that a number of pros would join in to offer their personal approaches and philosophies. I needed to come up with a way to introduce the topic that would generate a good discussion and produce the type of contributions she was looking for.

I'm sure that the massive amount work I've been doing on the DVD series and website lately dominated my current focus and thus influenced what approach I decided on. But I think it's worked quite well anyway based on the excellent input it's received from many experienced pros, and the civil/courteous nature of the discussion that transpired. My appreciation to all those contributed. I think it's been an interesting and useful thread.

And jeeze, I hope I'm not coming across as less tolerant. I'm actually very open to different ideas and approaches. I respect attempts to think outside the box, and I sometimes here try to present threads that encourage that type of thinking. Encourage people to step back and take a look at the same picture from a bit of a different angle. I try to provide assistance to those who come here looking for it by responding to them as best I can on a technical level that matches the question, and in a friendly and respectful tone.

But I will challenge positions that I think are a bit limited in scope, and will try to offer wider perspectives for reader consideration. I think I've consistently done that since first arriving here. I've also watched thinking evolve. Cool.
post #40 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
I didn't see the thread that way at all, and never saw that link until you posted it. Are you doing viral marketing for Rick? :
Yep
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