New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Terminology

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
What's a jibber?
post #2 of 26
A terrainpark air head. Mostly teenagers and middle schoolers who think that all skiing and snowboarding is about is who got the most air, who tossed the sickest trick, or who slid the longest rail.
post #3 of 26
aka jib kids
post #4 of 26
Actually, a "jib" is a sales pitch, you know like a car salesman.How the name "jibbers" got started was when the whole freeskiing scene got started. Young up and commers riding the rails and hitting kickers doing tricks and such, were, and still are trying to "sell" themselves to, and looking for sponsors. Thus the sales pitch, thus the jib and it was called jibbing, aka. "jibbers" [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]
post #5 of 26
Thread Starter 
Wow, I feel old. Thanx.
post #6 of 26
Help me out. Last year on EpicSki I created a minor stir when I used the word "bonking." Some people thought I meant "boinking" which is something that couples do in the early stage of a relationship.

Did I misuse the work "bonking" or are my critics just revealing their woeful ignorance of the correct terminology?
post #7 of 26
incorrectLY. It's an adverb.
post #8 of 26
Nolo,
If I were you, I wouldn't use the word "bonk" over here, unless it was to be polite instead of using a similar four letter word beginning with F.

e.g. From the Guardian

or for those of a more adult nature, here is something for the discerning couple who don't want to use Simpson & Son's Tonic...
Warning - adult website!

S

[ November 16, 2002, 05:31 AM: Message edited by: Wear the fox hat ]
post #9 of 26
Edit: I did the same thing. I saw Fox's "bonk" and read "boink." Now I see that the "i" didn't make the translation from Amercan to Anglais.

I believe I will restrict my vocabulary to oink and book and just say "I hit the wall" instead of "I bonked in that race."

[ November 16, 2002, 12:11 PM: Message edited by: nolo ]
post #10 of 26
Fox, I don't know why anyone interested in skiing would be visiting "over there" anyway. Unless they liked skiing the flats in the rain, maybe.

"Bonk" in the America's has meant "hit", specifically on the head, apparently derived from the slang phrase "going bonkers" that meant mental derangement.

Of course, someone who's gone bonkers might prefer skiing flats in the rain. :~)
post #11 of 26
bonk (noun): to run out of gas, steam, energy, or glucose.

No you didn't post or use the term incorrect.
post #12 of 26
oboe: thanks for the correction
post #13 of 26
I am going to "sing along" with Fox.
A British friend of mine, always used "bonk", and I always understood it as per the English meaning.
OTOH she also used "you've gone bonkers" (Kneale explanation), while referring to me...and I also instinctively unserstood that she did not mean the first thing, rather that I was (or am) behaving, or saying something which led to think that I was/am slightly mad...or excessively humorous...
Now there is Nolo and Artimus use of "bonk" to say that you haven't got any stamina left.
So, like my english teacher used to say: "read the word in its context sentence, then give it a meaning".
Somehow slow, but the results are rewarding, and with the years, I don't need to stop and think about it.
As an example,if I were to read the word in one of Nolo's appends here, I would safely assume that you meant "out of stamina" (unless proved wrong by further reading) and poise myself to read the rest of the sentence with that spirit.
Reading the same word outside of here, it's another story

Oh, and thanks for the new word (the "i" version)
post #14 of 26
Yep matteo - bonk has both meanings here - so you would need to use context in Oz too
post #15 of 26
Quote:
Originally posted by Kneale Brownson:
"Bonk" in the America's has meant "hit", specifically on the head, apparently derived from the slang phrase "going bonkers" that meant mental derangement.

To quote Barnsey "There ain't nothing like the kisses from a jaded chinese princess,
I'm gonna hit some Hong Kong matress all night long"

so the 'meaning' would seem to be similar....
post #16 of 26
Quote:
Originally posted by Matteo:

Now there is Nolo and Artimus use of "bonk" to say that you haven't got any stamina left.
So, after a good "bonk", you may not have much stamina left?

Which meaning of the word were you thinking of?

S
post #17 of 26
No comment... [img]smile.gif[/img]
post #18 of 26
hey pondcrossers, we've ironed out "bonk," now how about you Brits telling us what is the meaning of:

PLONK
post #19 of 26
Do jibbers speak jibberish?

"Dewd! Yah, that air wuz s-e-w phat, I wuz, like, whoa."

[ November 20, 2002, 08:32 AM: Message edited by: daevious ]
post #20 of 26
BTW Xdog,dashskibum,Lars, thank you for the term jibber too, even learning a new word a day (and particularly if this is ski related) is an improvement.
post #21 of 26
Double posted

[ November 20, 2002, 08:30 AM: Message edited by: Matteo ]
post #22 of 26
Quote:
Originally posted by dahskibum:
A terrainpark air head. Mostly teenagers and middle schoolers who think that all skiing and snowboarding is about is who got the most air, who tossed the sickest trick, or who slid the longest rail.
I didn't know that there was one thing that skiing was about. I have always thought that skiing is about whatever provides you with the most fun. If someone wants to hang out in the terrain park, great. Really, what's the difference? Don't you get stoked when one of your friends lays down some perfect turns in an open powder field? Just because a certain aspect of a sport defines what it is about to you does not mean that someone else may get the same feeling from a different aspect of the same sport.
post #23 of 26
I still think the best translation is-

American: Randy = boys name

Anglais: Randy = horny and slutty
post #24 of 26
Plonk (n) = cheap wine
Plonk (v) = to put something down carelessly "I just plonked myself down at the side of the piste"

Plonker (n, slang) = (i) idiot, usually applied to a man, (ii) *****

Edit: I met the auto-remove-obscenity feature. Well, you can probably guess the other meaning of plonker.

[ November 25, 2002, 06:24 AM: Message edited by: Frances ]
post #25 of 26
For completeness, here's the Usenet meaning of plonk: the sound a newbie makes as he falls to the bottom of a kill file.

From The New Hacker's Dictionary
post #26 of 26
Plonk

As Frances said ...

Before glass was replaced by cardboard, plonk was commonly found in a goon ... as in flagoon!

Now replaced with "chateau cardboard"

But still containing PLONK ....

Also the sound of a rock .. Or other substances hitting water (feminine is PLINK)

PLONK commonly precedes BONK

as in

"Two parts plonk, anonymous bonk"

Oz

[ November 26, 2002, 03:32 AM: Message edited by: man from oz ]
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion