New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

My first post

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
I'd like some opinions on something. I've never skied, been to ski country, or in a ski shop. I live south of San Antonio, Texas, and it doesn't snow much here. However, I came into possession of 4 pairs of skis and I would like to know there approximate value if displayed for sale in a ski shop as used goods. I am completely ignorant about skis.
I can make pics tommorrow, but don't have any yet.
They are:
LACROIX Mach Racing about 3" wide and 6'9"long. Made in France Omega Structure. copper and black color..really cool looking
ASNES tru modell hickory sole made in Norway, 6'X 2 1/2", two natural wood laminates. I'd guess them as cross country skis, though I don't know why I guess that.
GEZE K2-185 made USA Hot lime color with black trim,carbon something and "easy turn base",
Kenissl white star pro edition, made in Austria White with pink soles, really cool snowbunny look!
Are any of you familiar with any of these brands or models and thier prices? I tried emailing some ski shops in Colorado, but my computer and I messed up. Thanks to anyone who makes an honest attempt to help me.
post #2 of 29
The asnes I have no idea, might be antique or good to hang on a chalet wall.

As for the other three pair, roughly $25-$50 per pair depending in condition. Try selling them on Craigslist so you don't have to deal with shipping. Otherwise, you'll barely break even after shipping if you try to sell them on eBay. Kind of the same as buying/selling a surfboard on eBay, but ski technology has changed a lot more in the past ten years making these skis obscelete and not really highly desired by collectors either.
post #3 of 29
Sorry surfman but no ski shop will give you anything for those skis. They are no longer worthy.

The ASNES might be cool as a mantle decoration.

Where do you surf ? Do you hit the gulf somewhere or are you displaced inland and long for the tides ?
post #4 of 29
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the input. I got $5 a pair in them, so I may just give them to the highschool kids around here that go out to Park City each spring. But, gosh I bought them just 'cause they are so darn beautiful!
post #5 of 29
Thread Starter 
Gary Z: I FISH the surf! At 67 yrs, my sking and surfing days have flown!
But I get out on my 18ft C.C. Kenner and fish every week.
post #6 of 29
Thread Starter 
The 3 pair of racing skis in hot colors and modern construction have those metal things that lock your feet in, but the skinny cross country looking two tone wood ones from Norway only have a heel lock, no toe, just a circular bump washer thing, How does that work?
post #7 of 29
The 205cm Lacroix might be interesting (read worth $10-20 to someone interested in retro gear), what do the 'metal things' say on them?

The K2/Geze combination sound like a fairly generic intermediate setup from the early 90s. Not much interesting there to my mind.

Is there a cable on the Asnes? What does the 'heel lock' look like?
post #8 of 29
The Asnes are cross-country skis (assuming you are measuring width near the widest point, not at the waist. I think the bindings are missing. Confused by 'heel lock', maybe just a heel pad that gives some traction for the boots. Cross-country ski bindings don't have 'heel locks' like the alpine bindings, cross-country boots attach just to the toe piece. I don't know if people still use wooden cross-country skis like that, but they are the ones I'd be most interesting in trying.

I'm surprised Comprex didn't comment on the White Stars. They sound more interesting to me than the LaCroix, but I'm no expert. I think you are reading Geze off the bindings. K2 and Geze are different companies. Typically the skis and bindings are from different makers.

Alpine ski design changed drastically in the last ten years, so interest in these skis will be limited.
post #9 of 29

Skis

Really pretty skis in San Antonio. Anyone like to buy the bridge I own out in the Pecos. Sell it cheap - it is really pretty. More? : Amusingly

interesting.:
post #10 of 29
Thread Starter 
Pete, you're a FUNNY GUY ! You gave me my earlyl morning laugh!

Let me thank all of you wonderful folks for filling me in on the ski world. It is really intersting to me.
Sky diving, scuba spear fishing, and skiing are 3 of the few things I missed out on in this lifetime. I would never want to ski downhill anyway, but I wish I lived in semi-flat snow country where I could try this Cross Country stuff. I knew a couple that moved to San Antonio from Montreal. They were in thier late 60's and still went cross country skiing sometimes. They really enjoyed it.
I'll make some pics here after my morning coffee, and try to put them on this tread. I'm not real good with computers, but lets hope it all works out.
post #11 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by surfman View Post
Thanks for the input. I got $5 a pair in them, so I may just give them to the highschool kids around here that go out to Park City each spring. But, gosh I bought them just 'cause they are so darn beautiful!
Some modifications might make them more attractive to said high school students:

post #12 of 29
That didn't seem to work quite right?
post #13 of 29
Thread Starter 
Right ! I'll try it on another board, and come back when I get it right.
post #14 of 29
Thread Starter 
post #15 of 29
The Asnes are cross country skis and are actually probably still useable for someone 110-160 lbs. The binding is what is called a 3pin design, designed to take low cross-country boots with 75 mm duckbill lugs. The front clip opens up, the boot is inserted so that holes in the boot line up over the pins, and the clip is closed. The wire bales like that were used for light duty boots with relatively thin soles (less than 15mm thick). Notice that there is a left and a right.

The K2/Geze is, as said, an intermediate setup of the early '90s (93?)

The Kneissls look slightly more recent, maybe '94-95. telerod, I have a pair of the same vintage Tele Stars if you're interested.

Of the lot, the Asnes are probably the most skiable, meaning fun on the dollar without too much effort or without a dated skill set. If they have wooden bases (the tur langrenn did) do they also have "lignostone" edges?

For decor purposes I would probably ditch the anodized aluminum light duty (read: children's model) 3 pins and try to find a brass-finish one.

If I was intent to ski them I would try to find a Rottefella Super Telemark like this:
http://www.orscrosscountryskisdirect...-bindings.html
(I think they were also sold by Rossignol) and a burly XC boot like a Karhu Nomad or Rossi X9.

Either should fit into the existing binding holes.

I would probably ski the Lacroix for kicks; one of those LOOK bindings seems to be missing the white Teflon AFD patch, but a replacement could be found. Decent lodge decor as they are.
post #16 of 29
The woodies are pretty! The alpine skis predate revolutionary advances in ski design. Todays rental skis will perform much better than these, though they were good skis in their day.

Comprex, I'm set for pre-shaped telemark skis. Thanks for the offer.
post #17 of 29
Thread Starter 
Thanks to all for your comments. Special thanks to Telerod and Comprex for the loads of info.
Sounds like you really know how to enjoy Winter!
Down here, Winter lasts about 2 weeks, and you never know which 2 weeks it will be.
post #18 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by surfman View Post
Thanks to all for your comments.
You're welcome. Don't be a stranger. Maybe you'll change your mind about winter, or else let us know how the surf is (there's even a forum for such things here ).
post #19 of 29
Don't bother donating the skis to anyone except a rabid collector.

There is not a shop that will set and adjust the bindings because of their age and there is a list they go by, it's a liability thing.

They are all straight skis and the world has changed; today skis have shape that help turning and you would be just setting their learning curve back about twenty years.

Kinda' like old surfboards. I'd love to have my old Weber Performer back (circa 1966), and as much as I did retro, those old skis would be the same a going back to a mahogany or redwood board.
post #20 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
Don't bother donating the skis to anyone except a rabid collector.

There is not a shop that will set and adjust the bindings because of their age and there is a list they go by, it's a liability thing.

They are all straight skis and the world has changed; today skis have shape that help turning and you would be just setting their learning curve back about twenty years.

Kinda' like old surfboards. I'd love to have my old Weber Performer back (circa 1966), and as much as I did retro, those old skis would be the same a going back to a mahogany or redwood board.
Stab a sail into my old Hansen 50/50 and you got a modern sailboard .
post #21 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by cometjo View Post
Some modifications might make them more attractive to said high school students:


Thats a great picture. It looks like the brunette girl is the only one with any idea what that crazy contraption is for.
post #22 of 29
Have them made into a adinorack ski chair...then they are worth some money!
post #23 of 29
That should be Adirondack chair
post #24 of 29
Thread Starter 
Some printing on the bottom on the lime green K2's says"Stone Ground Sintered Finish" and "Easy To Turn Finish", but that still is not in keeping with current technology, right?

Very creative idea on the chair there!
post #25 of 29
The materials are fine, the big change that happened was the shape of skis. For use on hard snow such as racing and recreational skiing on machine packed snow, a much deeper sidecut (curve of ski's side. resulting in an hourglass shape) is now used. For deep loose snow, much wider sks are now used. The modern shapes improve the experience so much, almost nobody wants to use old designs.

A bigger problem is the bindings actually.
post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by surfman View Post
Some printing on the bottom on the lime green K2's says"Stone Ground Sintered Finish" and "Easy To Turn Finish", but that still is not in keeping with current technology, right?
Flip them over and look at the bottoms. See whether the Asnes and the Lacroix have a center groove, and that the K2s and Kneissls do not.

That center groove is a throwback, the lack thereof would make part of the 'easy turn finish'.

Sintered bases are quite used today.

Quote:
Very creative idea on the chair there!
The Adirondack style is way, way overdone, imho.

There's a clever fellow on the net who uses slots and pipe to make folding ski chairs, very creative.

PS, pink was considered a men's color in Euroland in the 90s. For a (fortunately?) brief time.
post #27 of 29
Thread Starter 
Once agiain Telerod and Comprex, thanks for filling me in.
I noticed the grove all the skis but the k2. I thought the k2 would still be usaable,
Also, you asked about the finish on the Bottom of the all wood cross country. It looks like unvarnished wood, but feels like rubber, I can't figure that out. But they are so narrow, it would be like skiing on knife blades. They only weigh about 5 ounces per ski!!
post #28 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by surfman View Post
Once agiain Telerod and Comprex, thanks for filling
Also, you asked about the finish on the Bottom of the all wood cross country. It looks like unvarnished wood, but feels like rubber, I can't figure that out.
It sounds like someone put shellac (the stuff that comes in flakes, made from Indian tree-leech bugs, often has an orangish tint) on the bases. Shellac often feels rubbery and a little sticky in high-humidity conditions.

This is actually a good thing, particularly for a decor ski; the other methods of preparing wooden ski bases are with pine tar (you'd smell that, very likely, and, depending on the tar (i.e. depending on the tree and the cookers), it can look quite messy), or with grip wax.

You can test this theory by wiping a small area of the base down with rubbing alcohol. Neither pine tar nor grip wax should come off very much, shellac will. Leave the rest on, it's good stuff.

Quote:
But they are so narrow, it would be like skiing on knife blades. They only weigh about 5 ounces per ski!!
That's OK. Modern XC skate skis are even narrower. Those look short enough that a 6' person might actually be able to skate them without crossing the tails much.
post #29 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by surfman View Post
Gary Z: I FISH the surf! At 67 yrs, my sking and surfing days have flown!
You're never too old brah!!! I've met people skiing and surfing way older than you.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion