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Who's up and who's down: How did the ski companies really do? - Page 2

post #31 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by billy boy View Post
don't worry boy's....ski factories around the world are shutting down ! Soon they'll be 2 or 3 companies !
LOL I've heard that for 50 years!
post #32 of 44
Mid-season (next years models) releases started it all! Now most models that you buy (for full retail) in Nov. are "outdated" by Feb.!
post #33 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by DropCliffsNotBombs View Post
Mid-season (next years models) releases started it all! Now most models that you buy (for full retail) in Nov. are "outdated" by Feb.!
I agree. Also when graphics went from 3 year cycles down to the current 1 year.
post #34 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by billy boy View Post
don't worry boy's....ski factories around the world are shutting down ! Soon they'll be 2 or 3 companies !
Getting closer to coming true---

Jarden Corp. (USA) owns K2, Volkl, Roxy, & Marker.
Amersport (Finland) owns Atomic, Salomon, Dynamic, Volant.
Quiksilver (USA) is the owner of Rossi & Dynastar...anyone want to buy a ski making company or two, plus Lange boots?
Fischer (Austria) is still owned by the founding family.
Head (Dutch) is owned by a Swede who lives in the U.K. and makes the skis in Austria.
Elan is Slovenian.
Tecnica (Italian) owns Nordica, Blizzard
Scott is Swiss.
Stockli is Swiss.

Many of the ski companies make skis for other labels under contract.
post #35 of 44
I've been told by a certain someone who will be big in a year or two that Marker is on the verge of bankruptcy again.
post #36 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoftSnowGuy View Post
Getting closer to coming true---

Jarden Corp. (USA) owns K2, Volkl, Roxy, & Marker.
Amersport (Finland) owns Atomic, Salomon, Dynamic, Volant.
Quiksilver (USA) is the owner of Rossi & Dynastar...anyone want to buy a ski making company or two, plus Lange boots?
Fischer (Austria) is still owned by the founding family.
Head (Dutch) is owned by a Swede who lives in the U.K. and makes the skis in Austria.
Elan is Slovenian.
Tecnica (Italian) owns Nordica, Blizzard
Scott is Swiss.
Stockli is Swiss.

Many of the ski companies make skis for other labels under contract.
Tecnica and Jarden are partner groups.
post #37 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
the industry is not doing well due to the lack of snow and late season starts.
I had to double check to make sure what year this was from. Lack of snow? I'm bewildered.
post #38 of 44
Well, previous 10 years took their toll, and if the last season is indicative of future years, it will continue to improve. SIA stats claim last year was best ever....
BTW, not to argue, but Roxy is a Rossi brand and listed in the Quiksilver report under the Rossi umbrella...
post #39 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by CEM View Post
if the ski companies stopped living in the fashion idustry then they would do like they used to do which was keep skis the same for 2 years [sometimes longer] that way if in the first season a ski was slow to shift the retailer had a chance to sell it and make some margin the following season, now they are forced to discount the product and then wait for a mass pile of over production to get dumped onto the market somewhere...my guess is rossi will dump most of that excess stock into eastern europe or the far east

but who knows
Stockli - same ski for two years (other than race stock - but same top sheet).

As a binus - flat ski, choose binding and mount it at the correct balance pont for type of ski, size of boot, type of skier. Too easy.
post #40 of 44
Prickly,

I'm pretty sure every industry on planet earth DOESN'T work for fun only ..

it would be (IMHO) strange enough if Fischer made skis losing money, just for the sake of it.

it's true, many companies - other than ski makers - are into several businesses, even if not profitable, only to make sure their competitors don't eat their market share, but I believe Fischer wouldn't do that.

regards,

Pipppetto
post #41 of 44
The Swiss company that made the knitting machines we use and used to sell as a dealer closed down a relatively new plant (maybe 10-15 years old) not because they couldn't sell what they made or not because they couldn't find employees to work there, but because the land was worth far more to some other development use than they could make in profits for the foreseeable future. A US company tried to buy all their production equipment, but couldn't come up with the funding before they needed to clear the property, so everything went to the dump.

Every consumer product's history starts out with a mushrooming growth of competitors that eventually gets whittled down to the few most innovative and efficient producers. Efficiency has many aspects.
post #42 of 44
post #43 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by prickly View Post
Something to throw into the profitability mix for skimakers: I've been told that Fischer basically makes skis for the fun of it at this point. They sold their vaccuum technology to an aircraft-wing maker and don't need money anymore. Heard this a couple times, don't know for sure that it's true.
Check at
http://www.fischer-ski.com/en/
under Company - Fischer Group, three companies are listed, FCT, FACC and Loeffler...
FAAC (Fischer Aircraft Construction Company) is the one you're talking about: http://www.facc.at/en/ueberuns/index.asp?dat=history
Also check under "history" (at Fischer
1982
First transfer of know-how from ski construction to aviation
engineering: Ultra light, ultra strong composite
components used in making carbon struts for the
Airbus 300.
1988 Construction of first factory for Aircraft Construction Division.
Contracts from Boeing and delivery of large-scale
components to Douglas Aircraft for MD-11 jumbo jet.
Opening of second Fischer factory in Mukacevo, Ukraine.

So it looks like they did not sell the tech, but they decided to employ it in more "serious" business fields than skiing, and in the proceedings the Fischer Group made money out of it, kind of the tail had become more important than the dog to which it is attached to...
So it may well be that the Fischer-ski part of the group is being kept in the group as a pet-proj (and for sentimental reasons?) by the Fischer family...
post #44 of 44
Thread Starter 
Fischer also uses its carbon tech for exotic/racing auto body pans/panels etc. But I think that sports equipment remains financially relevant; they also make well-respected tennis racquets, other stuff. Suspect that part of this is being Austrian, which as a country identifies more intensely with skiing than any place I can imagine. The tail may be wagging things, but people still expect to see the dog...
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