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Leukemia/Lymphoma Marathon - Team in Training

post #1 of 86
Thread Starter 
Hi All,
I have officially registered to walk/run the Nike Women's marathon in San Francisco on October 18, 2008. :

I am doing this to benefit blood cancer research but also, selfishly, as a personal goal for the summer. I think my body is capable of handling it but want to test it. I know it will be demanding and I will set up a personal blog (once I figure out how to and keep you all entertained....any hints appreciated).:

Any donations you can make will be very much appreciated by blood cancer victims, their families and by me.

You can donate online. My webpage is at:
http://pages.teamintraining.org/sj/nikesf08/mgmc

Thanks in advance for any help.
post #2 of 86
As the first bear to donate, and a Team in Training Alum, I'd encourage everyone else to support this cause too.

It's a great cause -- the leaps and bounds that've been made in curing leukemia thanks to the LLS are really amazing. On top of that, the support from all of us on the sidelines will really help Spirit through her training.

Good Luck
post #3 of 86
Thread Starter 

Leukemia Marathon

Thanks Aleph Null,
I appreciate your support and the donation. You've been through the process, so you know what it's all about.

Looking forward to the training:....but appreciate any hints from anyone. I think the coaching should be great though, considering the success rate.
post #4 of 86
I continue to be inspired by you!
Lets make this a sticky for a while.
post #5 of 86
Thread Starter 
Thank You TC!!!! Many, many thanks for your generosity also!!!! It's mutual, believe me!
post #6 of 86
Thread Starter 

Leukemia Marathon Training

Just got back from the kick-off meeting for the summer season events for the Bay Area Team in Training.....a ballroom full of people training for a half marathon/marathon/century or triathalon. Each event type has a head coach, assistant coaches and a mentor for every group of 4-6 people to ensure you're doing ok w/training and fund raising. How's that for a lot of attention? Very inspirational group.

FYI, I am dedicating this marathon to someone I know. Her name is Anne and she is a member of a group I belong to. She is quite ill with leukemia but remarkably calm and positive in spite of it all. She writes beautiful poetry, loves cats and is, in general, a shining example for those of us who know her.

I'm glad I found out about this opportunity. In some ways, it's a gift to myself (I'll be sure to remember that when I'm in pain!!!!):. I'll keep you all posted.....

Anybody w/tips on how to set up a blog? Sorry, haven't done any research and maybe its painfully obvious....???
post #7 of 86
Thread Starter 
As mentioned, training officially starts next Saturday. I hope to have a blog set up before or shortly thereafter.

In the meantime, I've been gathering info on blister avoidance, how to hydrate during the marathon and practices, clothing recommendations, etc.

One coworker has done 4 of the TNT marathons and mentored twice, so she has a lot of info. But she actually suggested buying running shoes (it's a walk/walk-run event for me) that are larger than normal (perhaps a size larger)....does that make sense to you experienced marathon walkers/runners?? Any other tips??

Looks like all of the discussion on drops in discretionary income is not a good omen for Leukemia marathon donations from bears. No worries, I'm racking my brain for friends/business associates/service providers/grade school teachers, etc. etc. to ask for money. So far, have 34% of minimum requirement raised! But should you feel the urge to contribute anything, please see my web page at:

http://pages.teamintraining.org/sj/nikesf08/mgmc
post #8 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ski Spirit View Post
As mentioned, training officially starts next Saturday. I hope to have a blog set up before or shortly thereafter.

In the meantime, I've been gathering info on blister avoidance, how to hydrate during the marathon and practices, clothing recommendations, etc.

One coworker has done 4 of the TNT marathons and mentored twice, so she has a lot of info. But she actually suggested buying running shoes (it's a walk/walk-run event for me) that are larger than normal (perhaps a size larger)....does that make sense to you experienced marathon walkers/runners?? Any other tips??

Looks like all of the discussion on drops in discretionary income is not a good omen for Leukemia marathon donations from bears. No worries, I'm racking my brain for friends/business associates/service providers/grade school teachers, etc. etc. to ask for money. So far, have 34% of minimum requirement raised! But should you feel the urge to contribute anything, please see my web page at:

http://pages.teamintraining.org/sj/nikesf08/mgmc
June 3, 2008

Dear SS:

Yes, get "RUNNING" shoes at least one size larger. Rule of thumb, in a STANDING position, while wearing both shoes, a person should be able to press down on your front toe box (tip of the shoes) and barely able to feel your big toes. Any "good" running store should be fitting you this way, once they know that the shoes are for distance event (10 miles are more). The reason for a larger shoe is that the further you run, your "FEET" start swelling and so the toes start bumping into the front of the shoes causing pain, discomfort, cramping of the feet as well as "black toe" nails. Another good piece of advice is to get two pairs of shoes and rotate them. A trick that works for me is, every night wash your feet, dry them and rub them with vaseline to keep them soft. This will cut down on the frequency of blisters. The reason for running shoes and not walking shoes is that even though you are going to run/walk the event, running shoes provide more support than walking shoes, since they are designed to absorb the impact of your feet pounding on the pavement. As you have said, the goal is to finish the whole 26.2 miles, which in your case will fell longer since the course, if in the city, will be quite hilly. Don't go for speed, easy does it. We are looking forward to a great effort by you.

Hydration is a two edge sword. Well hydrated muscle don't cramp up and are more efficient. However, too much water in your system causes dilution of electrolytes which in extreme cases lead to death. The loss of electrolytes is known as hyponatremia. I include the following webpage for your information:

http://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercis...drink-too-much

Originally, I was a great "hydrator". I believe that I over did it in my first few marathons. It wasn't until New York Marathon, where the event included a short warning on the dangers of over hydartion that I realize that I had gone overboard. During the next 5 months of training, listen to your body as well as coaches. One warning sign is light headed or dizziness.

The months of training leading up to the event is to provide you with the capability and more importantly the confidence that you will be able to finish the event, as well as giving you the opportunity to experiment with different levels of hydration, nutrition, shoes, clothes to wear (in order to avoid chaffing), sleep patterns etc.

Finally, DON"T run the marathon in anything NEW. You will be tempted to wear the new running shoes, tank top or running shorts which you purchased at the Runners Expo when you picked up your bib number. DON'T. Last two weeks prior to the marathon, don't do anything different from the routine which got you there. Enjoy. I know you will. It is guaranteed.

Think snow,

CP
post #9 of 86
To add on to the shoe discussion:

+1 for a good running store -- they'll be able to help you out in finding the right shoes for you, and it will make a difference, especially if you're pounding pavement instead of trails. Take the time and spend the extra money.

Change your shoes after about 500 miles. They might still look okay, but when the midsoles break down, they'll lose that cushioning and kill your knees.

AVOID COTTON!!!
Since this is a ski forum, I won't have to belabor the point, but cotton sucks when wet -- even when you don't need insulation. Cotton socks will cause blisters, cotton t-shirts shirts will chafe.
post #10 of 86
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the reply CP. I appreciate it. They have a knowledgable/large group of coaches but I'm looking for any and all tips (some of which you might not get at the time that you need them; ie. my co-worker said don't buy two sets of shoes at once...get one, see how they feel, you may need to buy multiple sets to get the right feel for you........sounds a little like bootfitting.....any tips on particular shops (as you know I'm in Bay Area..).
Great tips on hydration, blisters, "new" stuff...thanks!
Looked at the training schedule, they get you up to 22 miles 2 weeks before event and that's the max.......then you do a couple of decreasingly difficult trainings and that's it!!
I think it's a really good thing that I did that metric century...ie. thinking how am I going to do this and knowing you did something like that earlier (I did hit a wall about 3/4 through it but after I crawled my way past that point, I was ok).
Thanks again CP!!!!! I'll keep you all posted!!
post #11 of 86
Thread Starter 
Thanks also Aleph Null. Appreciate the tips on shoes and cotton. Shoes appear to be pretty darn impor tant...like ski boots almost? But then so do socks, any form of clothing,etc.

What is your preferred way to carry water? Did you carry water?

Anyone recommend a particular store for running
shoes/apparel in the Bay Area.....went to Metrosports last time I got new running shoes (Asics - they seemed
really cushy-they have definitely broken down after (gasp.. like 3 yrs or so..heel pain when I walk 4+ miles).

FYI, heard more specifics about the pain experience...should be interesting...I'll be sure to share it with all of you!!!! You'd think I could come up with an easier weight loss/conditioning program......just kidding..I'm looking forward to the challenge!
post #12 of 86
I had one of those camelback 1.5ltr backpacks and I liked it: It does get your back all sweaty and it sloshes a little bit so a lot of people don't like it -- literally "your mileage may vary." I honestly probably needed it more for the training runs than the race itself as they were really good with having water (and oh-so-delicious blood oranges) available regularly... but it' nice to be a bit independent.

A good shoe store will immediately be able to tell if you over pronate etc, and be able to recommend a high-milage shoe, and it's worth it. I went to a foot locker recently and they had NO running shoes and no one knew the difference. A good running store will also let you take the shoes out around the block for a "test run"
post #13 of 86
June 3, 2008

Hi SS:

Sorry don't know any good running stores in the Bay area. A good running store is VERY MUCH like a good ski shop fitting you with ski boots. They should look at your bare foot, checking for foot shape, bunions (pressure points), ask about any pronation problems and ask questions about your mileage, training program and for which event you are making the purchase (ie short runs, medium runs, long runs etc). Also, they should also OBSERVE you running in shoes they recommend, to observe stride efficiency as well as any pronation problems which you may have. See following website:

http://www.steenwyk.com/pronsup.htm

And yes, just like in skiing, if you are ever are going to be serious about your running, get "running" orthotics. The skiing ones don't work for running. At this time, if you are not sure how "into" running you are going to get, purchase a pair of "superfeet" at the running store (stores which offer orthotics or carry superfeet is another indication of being a serious running store). The best way to be fitted with running orthotics is to go see a running orthopedic doctor (M.D.).

Socks, as Aleph Null mentioned, not cotton. Also there are socks which are very thin "double layered" polypro which help prevent the formation of blisters. Before each run, lathered your feet with vaseoline. On the west coast sun block is very important due to the dry atmosphere. As for water, a camel back is ideal but at least a water bottle carried on a belt would be the minimum. Ah, least I forget, a powerbar (or whichever energy bar you prefer) for every hour of every run. Very important. Some salted peanuts and hard rock candy for the last few miles, even during training and definitely for the marathon itself. Will either prevent hitting or gettiing you over the wall during the last 6 miles.

The final two weeks known as "tapering". That is the time to really enjoy yourself and bath in the rewards of a successful training program. Also, crossing the finish line and getting your hard earned finishers medal. Nothing can beat that. Almost like skiing, (I said ALMOST) a perfect run when you finally put the medal around your neck.

Finally, although I'm sure that "pain" has been mentioned (I've mentioned it), a "good" training program will either completely eliminated it or cut it down to a tolerable level. I wouldn't worry too much.

I started running 20 years ago as an adjunct to skiing i.e. something to do after winter and to keep in skiing shape. Now, I'm not sure which passion is secondary, skiing or running. Hope you maintain a regular running program even after you complete your marathon.

Think snow,

CP
post #14 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieP View Post
June 3, 2008

Hi SS:


Ah, least I forget, a powerbar (or whichever energy bar you prefer) for every hour of every run. Very important. Some salted peanuts and hard rock candy for the last few miles, even during training and definitely for the marathon itself. Will either prevent hitting or gettiing you over the wall during the last 6 miles.
Try out a few different things to eat during your long training runs -- When I run, almost the only thing I can eat is GU. Solids don't go down well, though obviously they work for Charlie. I tried honey, because that was recommended as well, and that was no good for me at all. But find what works and stick with it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieP View Post
Finally, although I'm sure that "pain" has been mentioned (I've mentioned it), a "good" training program will either completely eliminated it or cut it down to a tolerable level. I wouldn't worry too much.
Until you try walking down stairs the next day

But it's a good pain...
post #15 of 86
Thread Starter 
Really great advice CP and AN.....THANK YOU!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

These are really good points. My hubby, who is very athletic, but not an experienced marathoner, was saying he thought I should forego vaseline on the feet and allow callouses to develop but my multimarathon co-worker was saying do eveything to avoid blisters and use vaseline before every run....so thanks for confirming.

Guess I will have to find out about food. I know when cycling I had regular food (bananas, fig newtons, etc.) and also GU for those more immediately desperate moments. GU works well and quickly. Having something to draw on (especially after 20 miles makes total sense).

This may be a silly question but do running jerseys have pockets...like cycling jerseys do??

Also, last but definitely not least.........THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU.....Telerod15 (I appreciate the help!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!)
post #16 of 86
Thread Starter 

Donating time and talent

Hi All,
As this is a site for people who love to ski, I was wondering if any of you who offer services would be open to, instead of donating money to the Leukemia Lymphoma Society, be willing to donate service(s) for free. For example, I could offer ski lessons at a radical discount to people (funds to go to LLS) volunteered for free by pro, lift ticket to be covered by student. I was hoping I might be able to persuade pros from various areas who offer ski lesson/bootfitting..any other type of services for free. I would offer those to the general population at a radical discount from the ski resort/retail rate (funds to go to LLS). For ski lessons (say a 3 hours lesson as less time is not nearly so effective), I would either ask the buyer to get their own lift ticket or if any of you have free lift tickets you could donate (I have to check Epic ski pass buddy/friend terms and I could offer mine if workable). I would propose to offer service at some set discount from the retail price so all donees are on an equal footing (for example, if the retail price of a lesson you give is $500, I would offer it for a $250 donation to LLS. I would probably need to get resorts to agree that it would be ok to do this (lift tickets provided but resort is donating its faciities). These are the services I would propose that could be offerred:

1) 3 hour ski lesson (time to be agreed by both parties/location decided by you)

2) Bootfitting services (propose summer/fall time (non peak timeframe).....bootfitting free, if it results in a sale all the better for you. Could offer custom footbed as another service, etc.

3) Donations of lift tickets (if you have free buddy tickets, you could donate those)

If any of these work for people, you could help a really good cause by spending time (rather than money directly) and for people making money donations, it would be an unspeakably good exchange!!

If anyone would like to help, please post or PM me.

Gratefully yours..........
post #17 of 86
Thread Starter 

Training has Started

Just a quick note to say official training started last Saturday. Blog in development and will be available shortly.

Granted, it is a little early but I think this is going to be a fantastic experience. In fact, I'm daydreaming of doing a century next summer (but one thing at a time).

I decided to totally drop the request for service donations..way too complicated and really didn't seem practical. However, my latest strategy, after racking my brain to ask every single person I've ever known (haven't completely run thru those people yet) to also
1) carry cards when I do training walks since someone stopped to ask me what I was doing this morning
2) think of people I know with semi deep pockets who I know (ok more indirectly...we'll see what happens...)....

Trying to think of services I could provide...anyone live in Silicon Valley who wants to have me do their laundry done for $25? Let's see I'm a reasonable baker??? Actually, I'm really good at bargain shopping on the web......hmmm, those don't seem like really great money-making ideas, do they? Guess I'll have to keep thinking.............
post #18 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ski Spirit View Post
Just a quick note to say official training started last Saturday.

Granted, it is a little early but I think this is going to be a fantastic experience. In fact, I'm daydreaming of doing a century next summer .
June 8, 2008

Hi SS:

Got to admire your Spirit. No wonder you have the second "S" in your handle. Instead of a century, you have two of the most beautiful marathons in your back yard, Big Sur and Lake Tahoe. Finishing these will better prepare and condition you for further Ultra-marathons considerations. You go for it!!!

How about a brief run down on your thoughts of your first training run?

Think running,

CP
post #19 of 86
Thread Starter 
Thank you CharlieP! You are kind!

There's a big write-up on my blog about the first day of training. The title for my blog is "Training for the Nike Women's Marathon." My husband says he needs a blog titled "Husband of a Woman Training for the Nike Women's Marathon." I'll be a lot of people would enjoy reading his blog too (but I don't think he'll actually create it...). Hope to figure out a couple of set up questions and then I'll let everyone know where blog is.

In the meantime, the 1st day of training--up at 5:30AM to get ready and get to Foothill College track by 6:45AM.
About 70 people (maybe 10 men). It's primarily a walk group (perhaps walk/run).

Learned about speed walking technique. Definitely goofy looking and amazingly effective! My hubby and I were walking to a neighborhood place for dinner and he was falling behind so he asked if I could PLEASE walk normally!!

Some current blood cancer and family members of blood cancer patients spoke. It's clear they're very grateful to LLS! Kind of emotional...........

We sat through a clinic on shoes and apparel. Then we split up and rotated through 3 clinics on walk technique (mentioned above), stretching and core/back strengthening exercises.

We all belong to smaller groups, each with a mentor. Our mentor, changed at the last minute, is a woman who used to run marathons (too many injuries) who is an amazingly fast walker (5 hr. 20 min?). The two other women who showed up in my group are quite fast also...oh oh, my goal is to survive...but it did seem reasonably easy to pick up the technique. The head coach asked me if I had done a marathon before....think it was my incredible technique...I think it was probably the fact that I was wearing a Nike women's marathon shirt (it was on clearance!!!).

Our training ended by about 11am.

Had lunch w/my hubby after getting cleaned up and then we went SHOPPING!!!!! Fantastic store in Campbell...Running Revolution. Got new shoes (ended up w/men's shoes..New Balance), wright socks, a Nike cap, blister shield and misc other goodies. We closed the store down at 6PM!!!!

Do you think that has something to do with the husband feeling like he needs his own blog????
post #20 of 86
Thread Starter 

Blog---So You Can Virtually Share the Pain and the Glory!!!!

Ok, the blog is located at http://preppingforthenikewomensmarathon.blogspot.com

There is just one entry for the first day of training but more will come..........
post #21 of 86
Thread Starter 
Just a quick update to let you all know I finally updated the blog on training and, last week-end's experience, assisting with a women's self defense class! Second officially coached training next Saturday.

Oh, also, I HAVE A CORPORATE SPONSOR!!!!!! It's our company's audit firm, BPM (Burr, Pilger, Meyer). Don't know how much they're contributing yet..but very exciting news!!! Friends, acquaintances, ski buddies, bears, divas, etc. have been amazing in their support. THank you all!!!! Still have money to raise as of this time, but it's looking a lot better than when I started!

Anyone have fast beat walking/running music to recommend? Hip-hop/electronica seems to work best so far...but I'm open to suggestions!!
post #22 of 86
Thread Starter 
Another quick update; first speed training last Wednesday; I am quite slow but hope to speed up....so much for my technique..at least there's quite a bit of time to work on it!

Doing ok on fundraising (think I will have enough with promised donations yet to be received). Thank you VERY MUCH Bears/Divas !!!!

For anyone who likes poetry, I will be adding some poems written by my honoree(the friend who has leukemia). She writes beautifully expressive poetry and she is a shining example of peace, gratitude and acceptance regardless of circumstances!

Blog is located at:http://preppingforthenikewomensmarathon.blogspot.com
post #23 of 86
Thanks for the update.
I look forward to reading your blog on this.
post #24 of 86
Thread Starter 
Happy Independence Day Everyone!!! Just an update to let you know, I think I'm going to do the run/walk program instead of the walk program for the marathon, more variety, interchanging muscles, seems more natural, etc.

I used to do social runs (Bay to Breakers, Wharf to Wharf). I am definitely not fast, but I think walk/running will also speed up my walk.

Also, added more poetry from Ann, my honoree (the person I am dedicating the marathon to). By the way, I recently found out that Ann spent some time in India working with Mother Teresa with her work tending the dying! Ann is an amazing person to know/be exposed to. She is one of the most giving people you could imagine.

To see updates to blog checkreppingforthenikewomensmarathon.blogspot.co m
post #25 of 86
Thread Starter 
Another quick update. I'm doing the San Francisco half marathon on 8/3 to get real race experience. Our planned walk/run for that week-end is 12 miles, so as my mentor says, what's another 1.1 miles? I will be doing it as part of Team Parkinson (no further requests for money from me though!).

Not exactly a speed demon but really enjoying the training (and associated effects). Walk/run is definitely the program for me although not exactly a fast runner either. But, that's ok, my goal is just to finish!!!
post #26 of 86
July 18, 2008

Hi SS:

Thanks for the updates. Makes me feel like I'm part of your effort. I know that you'll enjoy this event. You doing the first half or the second? Walk run is the way to go. Finished 15 marathons using this method.

One remark I'd like to make. I seem to remember you saying run 1 walk 1 (minute). I find it requires more effort to start running from a walk. That is why I like to keep the "number of run starts" low. You might want to play with run "X" walk 1, where you adjust "X" to an optimum length of time for your physical condition. Might even want to play around with run "X" walk "Y", where you adjust both "X" and "Y". This is not to intentionally speed up but to expend less energy. However, if you can expend less energy, speeding up is a just a happy by product.

Go for it and good luck.

CP
post #27 of 86
Thread Starter 

Thanks CP!

Thanks for being part of my effort and for all of the great advice CP! It's the second half marathon, which was still open.......but the real reason is because the course is open 30 minutes longer.

Actually I looked at a You Tube video on the course and I think I got the better half since a lot of it goes through Golden Gate Park (scenic in the video anyway).

I'm behind on my blog. 8 miles last Saturday (felt great afterwards..must be those endorphins). However, Sunday crippled!

Definitely doing run/walk. TNT has a run-walk coach and she tells you what intervals to do. I'm reading lots of books too though and looking at those suggested intervals. The TNT coaches biggest concern, I think, is that you remain injury-free.

Will need to keep working on speed!
post #28 of 86
July 20, 2008

Hi SS:

A word of caution. Speed causes injury (note the "crippled the next day" upon your completion of the 8 mile course).

I've done a few laps in the Golden Gate Park. My friend whom I stay with, lives in the Sunset Area of the city and is 6-7 blocks away from the park. Whenever, I visit him, I'll do a few miles in the Park. Great place to run. I envy you being able to enjoy it with the road closed.

You are right about the endorphins (otherwise referred to as second wind). Enjoy it every time I go out for a jog. We are lucky. A small minority of long time runners say they have never experienced the sensation.

CP
post #29 of 86
Thread Starter 
Oh, oh, CP, should have seen your post earlier.

"Speed" or something taking its toll. Was ok after 8 mile training week-end after last. This last Saturday missed 7AM mentor led training. Did 2 hours on my own on asphalt around neighborhood track, left knee has been stiff since then..no tenderness around knee. My husband tells me to keep taking advil and to keep moving (it does feel better when its warm rather than right after sitting for a long while in front of the computer...). Good grief, SF marathon in 2 weeks......any advice????
post #30 of 86
July 22, 2008

Hi SS:

Remember the three magic words for injuries: ICE for (I)ce (C)ompression (E)levation. Icing your injury is the MOST MOST important step in injury recovery because it prevents swelling. Anything serious, compress the affected area. Elevate your leg anytime you have the opportunity. Advil, IBuprofin etc is fine for anti-inflammation pain relief purposes. Lay off training for a few days (3,4 days). Next time you go out for training, listen to your body. Go out slowly for the first mile (at least two minutes per mile slower than your usual pace). At the end of the first mile, assess whether the injury/hurt is getting worse. If yes, STOP, go home. If not, repeat for another mile (you can pick up the pace a bit if you desire). Continue until your target training time or miles is reached or until your injury seems to have worsened, whichever comes first. Always start out slowly i.e. slow down the first mile (see previous remark about first mile pace). After you've warmed up, you can then MAYBE pick up the pace to where you feel comfortable. Also, remember the "Talking Rule". For most of your training runs, your pace should be so that you can carry on an easy conversation with a training partner, such as "I heard that so and so is having ...": :.

Be real, real careful about speed and/or distance. Remember Speed and/or Distance causes Injuries. Especially, when you combine BOTH speed and distance in the same effort. For you, 'Distance' can be defined as any length which you have never completed before, such as a first 12 mile run or first 16 mile run. Take your time, smell the roses, breath the fresh air, enjoy the outdoors, bond with your running partners, savor those endorphins. But the most important, finish your run injury free. That is what recreational running is all about.

Keep you eyes on your main goal, that BEAUTIFUL, BEAUTIFUL Tiffany finishers chain and medal at the safe injury free completion of the 26.2 miles. (I note that you are now aware of the distance after the decimal point. That .1 or .2 mile even though trivial to a bystander, is a killer to the participants). So lay off the speed, since you have to complete the "distance".

CP

PS: Right after an injury, do not "Warm/Heat" the affected area. ICE if first. Only a few days later, after the infection has diminished, then should you warm it to increase the blood circulation around the area. After this episode i.e. return to normal, do knee strengthening exercises. A good one is to lie flat on your back and lift each leg in the air, one at a time, so that the leg is straight up i.e. 90 degrees with your body. Repeat 50-100 times for each leg. Don't ignore routine stretching exercises. This will also prevent injuries from occurring.
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