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Ribs....

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
I need a recipe for some good ribs.Last week I tried a dry rub, but I couldn't find the recipe that I used last time on boneless ribs, so I improvised.
  • Brown sugar
  • Cinnamon
  • Cayenne pepper
  • Black pepper
  • Paprika
  • Garlic/Onion powder
I cooked this as low as possible on the second rack of a gas grill. They rub tasted ok, but the ribs were dry. I think with the boneless ribs there was more moisture.

I'm going for round #2 tomorrow. Charcoal grill and a wet rub/sauce. What do you guys have?
post #2 of 20
Boil them first for 45 minutes.

Then, take them to the grill just to add colour. Don't use high direct heat, unless you are flipping constantly -- the sauce will burn.
post #3 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE View Post
Boil them first for 45 minutes.

Then, take them to the grill just to add colour. Don't use high direct heat, unless you are flipping constantly -- the sauce will burn.
:
post #4 of 20
I have to chime in here... I have a killer rib recipe that I use for special occasions.

I score and rub the ribs dry, then put in the over in a pan with a rack at the bottom @ 235 for six hours, draining the fat every two hours or so. Once the 6 hours is over, pull 'em out (BE CAREFUL! They're going to want to fall apart) baste with wet sauce of your choice and throw on the grill on low heat just to char the edges a bit and gel the sauce a bit- Start by searing the meat side, and give it a minute, then flip to bone side and let the heat work through the bone for a few minutes. Voila! : Fall-off-the-bone ribs that taste very similar to sex. Just don't tell your friends... Or I may have to kill you...
post #5 of 20
Thread Starter 
I forgot to mention it above, but my dry rubbed ribs were periodically basted with



during the last 30 minutes.

After reading the Trekchicks Butt Rub again, I think that I had the heat too high. I'm also thinking that my ribs suck, as they didn't look anywhere near as meeting as some of those shown.
post #6 of 20
What is happening here, is that the ribs are steamed in their own moisture.

A pan filled with water between the heat source and ribs give similar effects. Ensure that you remove the "skin" from the back of the ribs -- scoring is simpler, but not as effective. I use pliers to remove this "skin". This allows the steam rising from the pan to better penetrate the ribs.

The Portuguese do this with chicken -- they grill chicken on a rotisserie while steaming from below.... You can do precisely the same thing on your own gas grill, with either chicken or ribs.

Boiling is more radical and much faster, but results are quite similar.

And you get a soup stock out of the deal to boot!
post #7 of 20
There are many ways to do it, but this is the procedure I have arrived at which results in the best pork ribs I have ever had anywhere.

Remove the membrane from the bone side of the ribs. Put on a rub, or just salt and pepper, wrap in plastic, and let sit for at least 6-8 hours or overnight in fridge.

Pull the ribs out of the fridge and let them sit at room temperature for about 30-45 minutes prior to cooking. During this time, get your grill stabilized to 250F. Towards the tail end, I put wood chips in my smoker box (for a gas grill) and get the smoke going pretty heavy.

Put the ribs on the grill meat side up and cook with smoke for 2 hours over indirect heat. So for my 4-burner grill, the 4th burner all the way to the right is the only one that's on (it's also firing below the smoker box) and the ribs are to the far left of the grill. I rotate the ribs a few times, but always keep them meat side up. I will spritz them with a beer/oil/season mixture as needed. The important thing is indirect heat, not "grilling".

At the 2 hour mark, pull them off the grill, wrap in foil (see ** note below), and then whack in the oven for another 4 hours at 250F. No maintenance is needed during that time. You might want to put a broiler pan or baking pan underneath the ribs in case the foil packets leak/drip a little.

** The rubbed ribs can go right into the foil. For the salt/pepper ribs, I would paint them with a good BBQ sauce then wrap in the foil.

At the end of the 6 hour cooking (all around 250F) you'll have meat that falls off the bone and is very moist but is still in great shape. I typically get about 1/8" to 1/4" penetration of a smoke ring from that initial 2 hours on the grill with smoke. I honestly think that makes all the difference in the world.

BTW, the rub I like has brown sugar, cayenne pepper, cumin, paprika, salt, pepper, and red pepper flakes. I think it's the "Southern BBQ Rub" from Joy of Cooking. We've also had great results from applying sauce before going in the oven, just be sure the sauce doesn't contain artificial smoke flavor -- you'd want a straight sauce.

Thanks for reminding me that I need to do some ribs this weekend!!
post #8 of 20
Thread Starter 
Skier219,

That rub sounds a lot like the recipe that I was mimicking. I was trying to stay away from the spicy a bit though, as the person who I was sharing these with doesn't like it.



Here's what I did for yesterday. Wednesday I pulled the membrane of the side of the ribs, which was a pain in the ass. I didn't do this the first time, butt there was no meat on that side anyways, so not much was lost.

I put the ribs, with a little salt and pepper, in the oven at 200-225 for about and hour. We then shut the oven off and went to the grocery store to get supplies. Back at the house, we slathered with sauce and left in the oven for another 45 minutes or so.

I put them on the grill (charcoal) for about 10-15 minutes per side, then we ate them. They were a little tough in spots where there was a little fat on the meat, but almost fall off the bone and juicy in the rest. All in all, not bad for a $13 rack of ribs that got the 2 of us 2 ok meals.
post #9 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE View Post
Boil them first for 45 minutes.

Then, take them to the grill just to add colour. Don't use high direct heat, unless you are flipping constantly -- the sauce will burn.

They'd throw you off the BBQ circuit....good ribs are not boiled.....braised maybe but not boiled

Learn how to cook the ribs and quit worrying about the rub.....once you learn to cook the ribs then you can worry about learning to make a rub. Buy a rub, run ribs with a coat of yellow mustard and liberally rub in purchased dry rub, let sit in fridge for a few hours up to a full day. Fire up grill but do not let it get above 250 degrees, then put in some smoking wood and go get your meat. Load meat to a 250 degree grill and let smoke for 2 hours. Take the ribs off the grill and wrap in foil and pour in a cup of apple juice and close foil package tightly. Put back on the grill for 2-3 hours. Remove rib package from the grill and take ribs out of foil. Elt the heat on the grill come up to about 275 and put ribs back on for 30-60 minutes to put a little bark on them. Then eat
post #10 of 20

Mmmm... Ribs

Boy this brings back skiing memories! I do a rib-feast at the end of the season for our Masters race group on the deck of the training center. Here is the basic procedure:

Get some of those disposable turkey pans (one for every 3 full racks of ribs) and pour 2 cans of Guiness in each of them. Pour 1 can of Guiness into yourself just to get in the spirit of the event.

Crank your oven to 400 and prep the rib racks by removing the membranes, scoring the ribs and putting a dry rub on them. I use paprika, kosher salt, pepper and a bit of cayenne.

Put 3 prepped and rubbed racks into the Guiness filled turkey pans and cover with foil. Make sure you have a tight seal. Cook 'em for an hour and then turn the oven off. Let the ribs cool in the oven for a few hours.

Now you're ready to grill 'em. I use direct but low heat, cooking in batches and mopping the ribs with whatever BBQ sauce you like to use. I have tried making my own but it wasn't much better than the store bought stuff.

The beer flavor really comes out in the ribs and they have been met with general approval every time I've done 'em.

Cheers!
post #11 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by UGASkiDawg View Post
They'd throw you off the BBQ circuit....good ribs are not boiled.....braised maybe but not boiled

Learn how to cook the ribs and quit worrying about the rub.....once you learn to cook the ribs then you can worry about learning to make a rub. Buy a rub, run ribs with a coat of yellow mustard and liberally rub in purchased dry rub, let sit in fridge for a few hours up to a full day. Fire up grill but do not let it get above 250 degrees, then put in some smoking wood and go get your meat. Load meat to a 250 degree grill and let smoke for 2 hours. Take the ribs off the grill and wrap in foil and pour in a cup of apple juice and close foil package tightly. Put back on the grill for 2-3 hours. Remove rib package from the grill and take ribs out of foil. Elt the heat on the grill come up to about 275 and put ribs back on for 30-60 minutes to put a little bark on them. Then eat

Man, a day late, but that is exaclt what I was looking for. I cooked the 2nd half of the rack yesterday at my girlfriend's father's house. They both though I was nuts when I said it should take like 3-4 hours to make the ribs. He said to just put them in the oven at 350 for 30 minutes, then the grill for 20 with the BBQ sauce. So I did what I posted above.


Hollimonter,

I like cooking with beer (A little for me, a little for the ribs ), and have marinated steaks and made awesome stir fry sauces with Guinness.
post #12 of 20
Beef ribs. In a pressure cooker then soy sauce and garlic salt on the grill. Yumm yum.
post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by UGASkiDawg View Post
They'd throw you off the BBQ circuit....good ribs are not boiled.....braised maybe but not boiled
Boiling allows you to make quick ribs for the kids after school.

For the BBQ circuit I'd use my New Braunfelds oil drum BBQ and indirect heat for several hours with a very slow fire. A dry rub -white sugar, salt (1/1 that's the base of it), garlic powder, sweet paprika, cayenne, and dry mustard. Allow the rub a minimum of two hours to work on the meat before cooking.

For beef ribs, try Montreal Steak spice in the same BBQ, on a higher heat. They're done in about 3 hours.

Even with that BBQ, I cheat by continually loading small amounts of charcoal briquets instead of building a separate fire. The taste is HIGHLY dependent on the quality of the briquettes being used. Feel free to add twigs of cherry closer to the end.
post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by krp8128 View Post
....
I cooked this as low as possible on the second rack of a gas grill. They rub tasted ok, but the ribs were dry....
The dry result was probably due to too much direct heat. Even on the gas grill 2nd rack, you are still going to get direct heat, maybe 70-80% as much as the 1st rack. The only way to get less direct heat is to offset the meat way away from the burners or to put a heat defuser between them. Just about all gas grills are way to small for the first technique except for a trivially small amount of meat. If you have a full 2nd and 1st rack, you could try a water filled pan in the 1st rack and meat in the 2nd rack. That would work.

The bottom line with gas or charcoal is if you can draw a straight line from the heat source to the meat with nothing in between, distance doesn't make that much of a difference. Even if your thermometer says 250F, you're still getting some direct heat and you won't get a good "low and slow" result.

For charcoal, you need an offset smoker or a bullet smoker with a pan like a Weber Smokey Mountain (WSM).

You didn't mention what type of ribs. For ribs, figure about 6 hours for spares and 4 for baby backs going low-and-slow 225-250F.

There is no such thing as boneless ribs. "Boneless Rib" is an oxymoron if I ever heard one. What's sold as boneless (or bone-in) country ribs. Is just cut-up pork butt. Just buy whole boston butt at 1/2 the price and learn to smoke pulled pork.

Rub recipes are a dime-a-dozen. Google is your freind. "BRITU" is a popular one.

I tend to use a whole lot of rub. I dredge my ribs in rub like a was flouring something to fry. With most recipes, I cut way back on salt, maybe 1/2 or 1/4 the called for amount. If I don't, with the amount of rub I use, they would become way to salty.
post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by UGASkiDawg View Post
... Load meat to a 250 degree grill and let smoke for 2 hours. Take the ribs off the grill and wrap in foil and pour in a cup of apple juice and close foil package tightly. Put back on the grill for 2-3 hours. Remove rib package from the grill and take ribs out of foil. Elt the heat on the grill come up to about 275 and put ribs back on for 30-60 minutes to put a little bark on them. Then eat
Sounds a lot like what are called "3-2-1" ribs.

Three hours of smoke low and slow.
Foil and cook low and slow for two hours.
Remove foil and cook one more hour, maybe a tad hotter, to dry up the outside a bit.

It works very well with spares. It would overcook baby backs.
post #16 of 20
Yep, 3-2-1 is where I started honing my own recipe. It's a good rule of thumb in the absence of anything else. For pork ribs (I usually get St Louis cut) I think a minimum of 5 hours at 250F is required, 6 hours is optimum.
post #17 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219 View Post
Yep, 3-2-1 is where I started honing my own recipe. It's a good rule of thumb in the absence of anything else. For pork ribs (I usually get St Louis cut) I think a minimum of 5 hours at 250F is required, 6 hours is optimum.
Is this for the meat to fall off the bone?
post #18 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
Is this for the meat to fall off the bone?
I don't think "fall off the bone" is optimum. Ribs should have just a teeny bit of tug left.
post #19 of 20
5-6 hours gets me in the range of "fall off the bone into your mouth". They are not so loose that they are impossible to cut or handle. I like a teeny bit of firmness, but I don't want to have to gnaw the meat off the bone or need a flossing afterwards!

The cool thing about ribs is that it's fun to experiment. Cook for X hours and saw off a sample for tasting. Keep cooking until you get to the consistency you like.

I think I am going to experiment with four different sauces this weekend. I'll smoke for 2 hours, then divide the racks into 4 packets, each with a different sauce, before going into the oven for the final 3-4 hours. We have a terriyaki-ginger sauce that I'm thinking will rock on pork ribs....
post #20 of 20
I made ribs on Monday, and I used this recipe: http://jenyu.net/blog/2007/12/06/slow-oven-ribs/

They were AMAZING, although I let them go a little longer in the oven than I'd meant to because the people coming for dinner were late. I think 7-8 hours would be just about right (since I ended up at closer to 8.5).

I'm not crazy about the rub (it was good, but not quite what I wanted), but it was tasty. I'll work out a rub/sauce recipe next...


aaron
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