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Any suggestions for a first time commuter bicycle? - Page 4

post #91 of 115
Ow! My eyes! My eyes!

I like the curved seatstays and smooth looking fork. That's by far the coolest looking pivoting stem I've seen since Look Ergo. A less comfortable saddle or a Brooks, a flat handlebar and clipless pedals would turn this comfort bike into an urban assault vehicle, should you decide to go that way. Looks good as is.
post #92 of 115
Did I ever show you my priest bike build?

post #93 of 115
Sweet commuter man! All you need now is a rack, panniers, lights and computer, then you'll have the ultimate Winnebago commuter bike.

Good to hear you're riding your bike. On that note, I'm gonna go take mine for a spin.
post #94 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by WILDCAT View Post


Three weeks since my purchase I've upgraded the wheelset with Shimano LX Mavic A319 Touring & 700x28 Gatorskins.
I've put about 300 miles an the bike since its purchase. I've lost about 8 Lbs and hope to lose much more by Thanksgiving.
I ve rode slightly more than that so far this year on my MTB and I havent lost any weight.:

Although I cna pretty much dust lonnie going up which was my only goal this year
post #95 of 115
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
I ve rode slightly more than that so far this year on my MTB and I havent lost any weight.:

Although I cna pretty much dust lonnie going up which was my only goal this year
Dude, your driveway provides a climb taller than anything in my entire state.

Michael
post #96 of 115
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobatt View Post
Sweet commuter man! All you need now is a rack, panniers, lights and computer, then you'll have the ultimate Winnebago commuter bike.

Good to hear you're riding your bike. On that note, I'm gonna go take mine for a spin.
Thanks Bobatt,

I scoped out a new commute route today, 21 fast miles supported by a 10 mile bus ride in the middle that takes me to the office (a 31 mile commute) for $1.50.

I hope to really do some miles this year.
post #97 of 115
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
Did I ever show you my priest bike build?

Damn... nice! History & details please!

Michael
post #98 of 115
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
Ow! My eyes! My eyes!

I like the curved seatstays and smooth looking fork. That's by far the coolest looking pivoting stem I've seen since Look Ergo. A less comfortable saddle or a Brooks, a flat handlebar and clipless pedals would turn this comfort bike into an urban assault vehicle, should you decide to go that way. Looks good as is.

I'm already :lusting: for a Lemond Poprad : http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=200230397555&_trksid=p 3907.m32&_trkparms=tab%3DWatching

...and I've only had my bike for 3 weeks .
post #99 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by WILDCAT View Post
Damn... nice! History & details please!

Michael
Hmm, the frame is a generic ('86?) Columbus TENAX tube Tempo from a Tennessee thrift store. The earlier ones had contrasting white paneled fork blades; I think I was looking for a Prelude or Tempo from '84 (chasing down a Columbus SL rumor) but this one was clean so I grabbed it.

Anyway, the project was to build a better Landrider, a bike for someone in their mid '70s. I was told:
- no complicated shifting. Two shifters is too complicated.
- No drop bars. Giant old handlebars.
- Incredibly easy to pedal.
- Nothing that looks like a mountain bike or like a BMX bike.
- It has to look like a mens bike but have a TT low enough for a comfy straddle.
- bog standard drivetrain parts with standard replacements

So, it is a 1x9 with only the barcon shifter on the right. The saddle (Specialized) and 105 short-reach brakes are just units I had sitting around. The Laprade post is original Schwinn. Respacing was straightforward. Crank and BB were straightforward. The wheels were straightforward: 700c on modern hubs.

The barcon stuffed things up. They don't make them for straight handlebar widths, see. So the bars are Nitto North Roads in steel (special order), the steel being thinner than Al, thus having more room inside for the barcon. After that, it was an issue finding brake levers that pulled the right amount of cable (and faced the right way). Eeesh. Without Sheldon and the patient folks at Proteus it couldn't have happened.


Unfortunately, for people in their 70s without much balance left it isn't as easy as riding a bike. It has maybe 50 miles on it.
post #100 of 115
Comprex,

You are my hero.

Great job.
post #101 of 115
Moustache bars are awesome. Really comfy for long rides, especially since my wrists are going from wrenching.
post #102 of 115
post #103 of 115
Thread Starter 

Commuter bike # 2

OK, It's time to upgrade !

I'm now cycling 100 + miles a week and I have a better idea of what my needs are. I like steel frames more than aluminum. I like bigger Kevlar tires more than skinny road race tires. I should have the bike ergonomically maximized for all day comfort and endurance.

I'm starting with this;

[ IMG ]

[ /IMG ]

See: http://www.somafab.com/frames.html

I would like to finish with this;


[ IMG ][ /IMG ]

The frame is $305.00 and with the help of Josh, I've found most of the parts to make a 1x8. I already have two wheel-sets, one with 700cx28 Gatorbacks for fast weekend rides and another with 700cx38 Armadillo's for commuting in Chicago.

Overtime, I'll upgrade it to a high spec bike with a quality CX group and a few bits of carbon here & there.

What do you think?

Michael
post #104 of 115
Are the drop bars a preference? I find I'm never on the drops, rather always on the tops of the brakes.
post #105 of 115
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE View Post
Are the drop bars a preference? I find I'm never on the drops, rather always on the tops of the brakes.
I'm on the fence concerning which style of bars. My current bike is a flat bar. I like it, but I spend 98% of the commute just sitting & spinning. I expect that the drop bars will encourage a more active riding style and get me off my seat more often.

Michael
post #106 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by WILDCAT View Post
I expect that the drop bars will encourage a more active riding style and get me off my seat more often.

Michael
Something about that seems the wrong way 'round, not sure what.

Drops are great for out of saddle work, sure. Actually the drops are great anytime the hips move forward, including sitting on the rivet.*

But, erm, why would you want to encourage coming off the seat, and how is having drops going to do it? : Why not just shift into a taller gear?

(*And for windy days. And for massive or accurately modulated braking effort (read: rainy downhills), but that's a lever choice issue too).
post #107 of 115
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
Something about that seems the wrong way 'round, not sure what.

Drops are great for out of saddle work, sure. Actually the drops are great anytime the hips move forward, including sitting on the rivet.*

But, erm, why would you want to encourage coming off the seat, and how is having drops going to do it? : Why not just shift into a taller gear?

(*And for windy days. And for massive or accurately modulated braking effort (read: rainy downhills), but that's a lever choice issue too).
Hi Comprex,

A drop bar bike puts more weight on the hands and feet and reduces the dependence on sitting... IMHO.

One of the reasons for the upgrade is to fit the bike with the right stem, seat & seat post, and pedals & shoes to improve my efficiency.

I also want to be able to accelerate with some purpose, and getting my arse off the seat will help me to apply more power to the crank, no?

Michael
post #108 of 115
Well, I'm pretty convinced that more power to the crank (training effect) and stronger abs will take weight off hands and feet, whether the hands are up or down; ymmv, and we don't want ya with a sore neck.

Efficiency is a good goal, I'm all for it.

It is very hard to pedal round Os while standing, in fact it is not trivial to pedal Us, and even ()s take some hamstring kicking practice.

So, I am not convinced that standing necessarily applies more power.
I am easily convinced that standing applies greater peak force.

So max power seated would be my goal in tweaking seat position and cockpit.
post #109 of 115
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
Well, I'm pretty convinced that more power to the crank (training effect) and stronger abs will take weight off hands and feet, whether the hands are up or down; ymmv.

Efficiency is a good goal, I'm all for it.

It is very hard to pedal round Os while standing, in fact it is not trivial to pedal Us, and even ()s take some hamstring kicking practice.

So, I am not convinced that standing necessarily applies more power.
I am easily convinced that standing applies greater peak force.

So max power seated would be my goal in tweaking seat position and cockpit.
Well, I'm still learning... the logic you present makes sense. It just feels good to get off the seat and stomp!

I'm looking into having the bike fitted here: http://getagripcycles.com/page.cfm?pageID=93

[ IMG ][ /IMG ]

[ IMG ]
[ /IMG ]
post #110 of 115
They look pretty well organized.

I know diddly about fitting and balancing CX frames for all-day service, particularly loaded service. The BBs are high enough to throw most of my intuition off, and analysis bogs down. Hoping to learn something as well.
post #111 of 115
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
They look pretty well organized.

I know diddly about fitting and balancing CX frames for all-day service, particularly loaded service. The BBs are high enough to throw most of my intuition off, and analysis bogs down. Hoping to learn something as well.
Well that was the surprise concerning the Soma Double Cross; it’s dimensioned like a touring bike. While the BB location is not spelled out, the standover height and most other dims are more like a touring bike than a 29er.

I compared the key dims on the Soma Doublecross CX bike and the Surly Long Haul Trucker, see below;

CX
Center of BB to top of seat post 58cm
Top Tube C-C, effective 592mm
Top Tube C-C 582mm
Head angle 72
Seat tube angle 72.5
Chainstay length 425mm
Standover height 32.6 in
Headtube length 165
Wheelbase 1042mm


Touring
Center of BB to top of seat post 58cm
Top Tube C-C, effective N/A
Top Tube C-C 580mm
Head angle 72
Seat tube angle 72.5
Chainstay length 460mm
Standover height 32.7
Headtube length 171
Wheelbase 1066mm


The chainstay length, headtube length and wheelbase are significantly different, but everything else is very close.

These bike are not much different, IMO.

Michael
post #112 of 115
Thread Starter 

Hi everyone,

 

I'm marking a one year anniversary of improving my fitness and this should  be a good place to post it.

One year ago I returned to cycling with the purchase of a new bike for commuting. I enjoyed bikes when I was in my teens, but had probably ridden less than 100 miles in the last 35 years. I’m down about 35 lbs. More important, I'm more fit and am enjoying a more active lifestyle.

During the last year I’ve ridden more than 3000 miles, I'll have ridden 500 miles in April plus expect to ride another 500 in May. 

 

I'm not sure I'll ever hit my goal of 180 lbs. I was over 240 at the beginning on 2008 and I'm now under 215. The next 35 pounds will be difficult and I have yet to do what I need to do to reach that goal.

The improvement so far had really helped the skiing I enjoyed this winter. With 30 lbs less to carry and a functional cardiovascular system, I could ski like I meant it at JH  .

I did my first unsupported (near) century bicycle ride on Friday by completing 94 miles solo. It went well enough that I'll ride that distance two or three times a month from this point forward.

I really enjoy the avid cyclists and people in the industry, the focus on fitness and fun fulfills an important part of my soul.

I'm not sure I'll ever reach all my goals, the reward is in the journey. Thanks for the help & support here at Epic!
 

Michael  
post #113 of 115

Cat - congratulations -- excellent on keeping with it. Having recently gotten back on a road bike I can identify with how you're feeling.  Maybe my goal of 1,000 miles by the end of August is too modest! Sure seems so compared to your riding.

 

But I did set a personal speed record of 50.43 mph today, which felt sweet. I actually let out some kind of freakish noise and then started laughing when I saw I'd broken 50.  I have to find a better road to try for 60...the place I did 50 was a somewhat bumpy country road with waytoo many driveways.

 

I'd also like to do a century this summer...gotta work up to it though. Not there  yet. 

 

Again...awesome accomplishments.

post #114 of 115

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by WILDCAT View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
Single speed, Chicago style. http://www.specialized.com/bc/SBCBkModel.jsp?spid=32824

The Langster has a flip-flop hub so you can ride fixed or free. Some of the commuter bikes are sort of well, um...
Yeah, they do look a little.......not that there is anything wrong with that.

I'll avoid that mistake.

Michael


Then you went out and got a comfort bike! You were happy with that for two months? :( The Soma is a sweet ride though!

 

It's hard to believe it's only been a year. From rookie to rolleur in record time! Congrats on getting stronger and lighter (you, not the bike). If you ever get around to using the Garmont Squadras I sent you, strong legs will be to your advantage, but don't lose too much weight, that boot is best suited for a heavier skier. Haha. Just kidding. I'm still using Squadras at 195lbs. They are a bit stiff, but they work OK for me. Hint: they soften up with use. So get on them!

post #115 of 115
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post

 


Then you went out and got a comfort bike! You were happy with that for two months? :( The Soma is a sweet ride though!

 

It's hard to believe it's only been a year. From rookie to rolleur in record time! Congrats on getting stronger and lighter (you, not the bike). If you ever get around to using the Garmont Squadras I sent you, strong legs will be to your advantage, but don't lose too much weight, that boot is best suited for a heavier skier. Haha. Just kidding. I'm still using Squadras at 195lbs. They are a bit stiff, but they work OK for me. Hint: they soften up with use. So get on them!


Hi Rod,
 

 

Yeah, the comfort bike was outgrown quickly, damn do I hate that worthless suspension fork! Oh well, the bike brought me back to cycling, so I'm grateful. I think it was Comprex who suggested a Jamis Coda. That would have been better. Also Axebiker suggested a CX bike, and It took me a little trial & error to agree!

 

Cycling, like skiing, has the n+1 problem of always wanting a new bike. The Soma is a great all around bike and I do like the comfortable fit. The steel frame, larger tires & carbon fork does give me very plush ride. My goal now is to try to do century rides on a regular basis. The Soma is pretty close to a LD touring bike. Most of these are steel with room for 700 x 28 tires, racks & fenders. I have been looking at these two bikes with a lot of interest;

 

 

 

Frame Pistola, Road, True Temper OX Platinum
Fork Alpha Q CS10 w/ OX Platinum Steerer
Headset Cane Creek S3, 1-1/8", Black
Handlebar Size Specific: (43 - 45cm Frames) Salsa Poco, 26.0mm, Black, 53=46cm
Stem Salsa Moto Ace, 26.0mm, 1-1/8", Black, 90°,  53cm=120mm
Handlebar Tape Salsa Gel Cork, Black
Front Brake SRAM Rival, Front
Rear Brake SRAM Rival, Rear
Brake Levers SRAM Rival, Black
Crankset SRAM Rival GXP, 43=165mm, 45=170mm, 47/49=172.5mm, 51/53=175mm
Chainring SRAM Rival, 34-50T
Bottom Bracket SRAM Rival
Chain SRAM PC-1070, 10-Speed
Quick Releases Mavic
Cassette SRAM OG-1070, 12-26T, 10-Speed
Wheels Mavic Aksium, Black
Tires Continental Ultra Race, 700c x 25mm, Kevlar
Front Derailleur SRAM Rival
Rear Derailleur SRAM Rival, Short Cage
Shifters SRAM Rival, 10-Speed, Black
Seatpost Salsa Shaft, 27.2mm x 350mm, Black
Seatpost Clamp Salsa Lip-Lock
Saddle WTB Silverado w/ Salsa Embroidery
Chainstay
Protector
none
Color Stone Bridge Gray
Weight 19.0 lbs for 47cm

 

  • Ritchey heat treated, Cro/moly butted steel tubing
     
  • Full size bike can be split apart to fit into travel case
     
  • Eyelets on rear drop outs for rack capacity
     
  • Carbon fork w/ alloy steer and Canti bosses
     
  • Case size: 8.5" W x 26.5"H x 31"L w/ wheels
     

These bikes are not radically different than the Soma, so I will have to wait before I add anymore bikes.

 

BTW, thanks for the boots. I moved a pair of liners from some Salomon boots and the fit great. I need to mount some bindings to my old Salomon Supermountains and then I'll have a beginner Tele set-up.

 

Cheers,

 

Michael


Edited by WILDCAT - 5/25/2009 at 09:00 pm GMT
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