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Edge angle

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Recently I attempted to get bigger edge angle. Second thought. Why do I need bigger edge angle? What good does it do?
post #2 of 11
Bigger edge angles allows you to arc tighter turns.

"Why would I want to do that?" you ask," My turns are tight enough as it is." Once practiced, the ability to get bigger edge angles allows you to make slalom -sized turns with your GS skis, thus affording you a bigger range of turn radii that you can cleanly cut.
post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
..thus affording you a bigger range of turn radii that you can cleanly cut.
so eventually its about speed or gripping or both?
post #4 of 11
You said you tried to get more edge angle, were you sucessful?
post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayCantu View Post
You said you tried to get more edge angle, were you sucessful?
yes, by performing what Max said in my 'parallel shin' thread it is possible to get more edge angle just by flexing the inside leg more.
post #6 of 11
You said you tried to get more edge angle, were you sucessful?
post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by carver_hk View Post
yes
not much, but some.

Quote:
Originally Posted by carver_hk View Post
, by performing what Max said in my 'parallel shin' thread it is possible to get more edge angle just by flexing the inside leg more.
And this is how I get it.
post #8 of 11

Kiss

Yes, you need bigger edge angles as you start to ski faster and make tighter turns. Thats the skiing part. Its all a balancing act where the centrifugal force is pulling your CoM towards the outside and gravity is pulling you downwards. An increase in centrifugal force needs more inclination. Thats the physical part.

Dont forget that edge angle in itself is not whats important, its how you achieve it that matters. If you simply flex your inside leg more you will only fall towards the inside. If you do not compliment it with angulation for instance then you will never get much out of "higher edge angles". You will bank and skidd and feel terrible. But that is not your problem... what is?
post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
Yes, you need bigger edge angles as you start to ski faster and make tighter turns. Thats the skiing part. Its all a balancing act where the centrifugal force is pulling your CoM towards the outside and gravity is pulling you downwards. An increase in centrifugal force needs more inclination. Thats the physical part.

Dont forget that edge angle in itself is not whats important, its how you achieve it that matters. If you simply flex your inside leg more you will only fall towards the inside. If you do not compliment it with angulation for instance then you will never get much out of "higher edge angles". You will bank and skidd and feel terrible. But that is not your problem... what is?
I ll say this is a very good discription of the mechanics of edging. But my question is when there are other choices in making a turn what good does high edge angle skiing do? Up to now what I see is to stay carving and store more energy into the skis ready for a stronger rebound?
post #10 of 11
CARVING: The skis do the turning.
STEERING: The skier does the turning


CARVING: Smoother ride
STEERING: Rougher ride. The more you steer the rougher it gets.


CARVING: Anaerobic
STEERING: Aerobic


CARVING: Faster
STEERING: Slower


CARVING: Turn shape dependant on edge angle
STEERING: Turn shape not dependant on edge angle


CARVING: Ski sidecut plays big role in the range of available turn shapes
STEERING: Ski sidecut does not affect the range


CARVING: Requires more angulation as turn shape sharpens
STEERING: Requires little angulation, and less as turn shape sharpens


CARVING: Wide range of turn shapes available
STEERING: Wider range of turn shapes available


CARVING: To do well, requires more highly developed foundation skills
STEERING: Easier option for lesser skilled skiers.


CARVING: Grabs the attention of people riding the lift
STEERING: Puts people on the lift to sleep.


CARVING: NASTAR platinum
STEERING: NASTAR bronze
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by carver_hk View Post
I ll say this is a very good discription of the mechanics of edging. But my question is when there are other choices in making a turn what good does high edge angle skiing do? Up to now what I see is to stay carving and store more energy into the skis ready for a stronger rebound?
Other choises? You dont need high edge angles to carve. You dont need low edge angles to steer. You dont choose between carving and steering depending on your edge angles. You use whatever edge angles you need at any given moment whether you carve, steer, drift, skidd, jump, land, arc, scarve etc... A good example of edge angles are your friends in the other ma video thread. The guy is carving through the gates with high edge angles while the girl is steering through the gates with low edge angles. One is making tight turns while the other is making wide turns. What is your intent? Both are equally valid methods. The girl skied according to her own level with matching tacktics. So did the boy. The boy had to use higher edge angles to achieve his intent. And he did.

When Im out blasting with my SL or GS racing skis I try to carve as many turns as I possibly can but many times I cannot. Especially with GS skis. However, when I slip out of pure carving or arcing as some like to call it my skiing changes dramatically. Like Rick said above, steering makes the ride rough and racing tuned skis are not comfortable in the gray zone. Therefore I usually stop and start all over or continue with very slow skiing or sideways slipping with low edge angles untill I can pick up carving again. Carving and higher edge angles the faster I go.
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