or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › General Aviation Plane for ski transport
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

General Aviation Plane for ski transport

post #1 of 40
Thread Starter 
I was thinking about using a GA single engine fixed gear plane for transportation to and from ski areas. I am thinking that I would want one of the four seat tricycle gear planes, although I would only use two seats at most, because I don't want weight and balance problems. I think that a taildragger is interesting, but if I were trying to land between snowbanks, that the extra ground control of a steerable nosewheel might be a good thing (which rules out Grumman AA-5's, unfortunately). Even though I would have a preference for a plane equipped for light IFR, I would still try to limit flying to VFR, and no night VFR excpet to relatively better equipped and maintained fields. The planes I am thinking abuot then are Aero Commander Darter and Lark, Beech Musketeer, Sport and Sundowner, Cessna 172, 175 and 177, Piper Tripacer and Cherokee (140, 150, 160, 180, 151,161, and 181), and, if the price were right, Maule MT-7 160 and 180. If there are other similar planes I overlooked, please tell me.

One question is which of these planes can carry a pair of skis? Do I need to modify an airframe to carry skis, and if so, what kinds of modifications are needed on which aircraft?

A second question is, am I looking at the right set of airplanes, and if not, what am I missing? Would some smaller planes do the job? Should I be looking further up the line, to the Cessna 182's and Cherokees 235's? Are retractables a much better idea? Are taildraggers really a better answer?

A third set of questions surrounds the training I should get. I think a little mountain flying would be helpful for Eastern areas, and a lot of mountain flighttraing essentai for flying into Western areas. What other kinds of traiing would be important?

Finally, if you have tried using GA aircraft to go to and from ski areas, what are the important lessons you have learned, and think would help me?

Thanks for your thoughts.
post #2 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by FOG View Post
if you have tried using GA aircraft to go to and from ski areas, what are the important lessons you have learned, and think would help me?

Thanks for your thoughts.
I am learning to fly out here in Aspen.

Turbo Piston Single. Lots of HP for high altitude use. Our runway is at 7900ft. VFR is a rule, even the big boys won't land without 500-1000 ft of ceiling

PS> I learned to ski at Liberty and Roundtop, race for them when I was a kid
post #3 of 40
Density Altitude is a definate concern, especially in the spring.
post #4 of 40
Density altitude isn't much of a factor at most eastern areas.

Some of those choices are pretty old? Pie Chaser & Musketeer ...

How much allowance do you have for down time when you can't get back to your day job?
post #5 of 40
I bet Pierre would have some good input for you. You might try PMing him.... I don't know if he checks in here a lot anymore.
post #6 of 40
I would suggest a minimum of a C182 or C210 (or that caliber of aircraft) if you are planning on any of those trips being in Colorado or Utah. For the lower hills in the East, you could probably get away with less aircraft.

Density altitudes in the winter are not nearly as critical as during the warmer months. But frost, icing, and other wx based issues become serious issues.

As far as fitting skis into an aircraft? As ski length has shortened so radically over the past decade, it's likely you can get your favorite pair or two into just about any cabin. Just be sure to do a good w/b computation. The smaller/lighter the aircraft, the more critical loading is.

I would suggest that you take a mtn flying course in the area you plan on flying into. The mtns of the West offer much greater and some different challenges than the lower hills of the East.

Speaking purely from a Colorado perspective, plan on flying into mtn airports costing you the proverbial arm and leg.
Aspen (ASE) does not even offer parking to singles (even if you wanted to pay for it). But Glenwood Springs (GWS) just up Hwy 82 from ASE, has recently lengthened and improved their airport and has virtually no fees.
Eagle County (EGE) serving Vail/BC, Telluride (TEX), and Garfield County (RIL) serving ASE, all have landing fees and VERY high fuel prices. Over night parking is additional, and is NOT usually waived w/ fuel purchase.
Gunnison (GUC) serving Crested Butte, has fees, but are much lower.
Stevens Field (2V1) serving Pagosa Springs (Wolf Creek) has overnight fees, and reasonable fuel prices. They have recently expanded their runway as well, anticipating commercial service in the near future.
Durango (DRO) has a nice airport, reasonable fuel prices, and is close to Durango Mtn Resort.

There is an expanding system of remote AWOS-3 stations throughout the Colorado mtns. These will offer excellent go/no go information, as most also have an associated telephone number to hear the broadcast.

Remember- just like most GA flying, it's not usually the most economical way to get there, but it sure is the most fun!

I'd be happy to answer any other questions you might have about flying in Colorado Mtns. Just PM me.

Ric
ATP
CFI/CFII/MEI
Mtn Flying Instr, COS
post #7 of 40
A Pilatus PC-6 would be ideal!

You could haul a bunch of Bears and skis.
post #8 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
You could haul a bunch of Bears and skis.
Beers and flying don't mix.
post #9 of 40
You fly & I'll drink.

Now, since this is a serious question I'll shut the heck up ... but admit it, the PC is just about the ultimate ski hauling machine.

You just need a huge pile of money ... and talent to back it up ... and that leaves me walking.

post #10 of 40
Any reason you're stuck on a fixed gear?

Its a bit pricier than some of the planes you mentioned, but beech bonanzas are great planes. 6 seat, although the last two are sort of cramped, and most people take them out so they can have a nice big cargo area. As a four seater, theres room for two mountain bikes (or all the skis your could want) in the back with a bunch of other bags and stuff. The turbo engine helps climbing at altitude as well.


As far as advice for flying in the mountains, take NO CHANCES WHATSOEVER.

A few examples:

ALWAYS check the weather, both when you plan a trip, and before you take off. DO NOT be lazy. Be willing to wake up at 5am to get the best weather window. Storms usually move in later.

Unless you know the area and are 100% sure what valley you're in, fly above the mountains. There are a number of wrecked planes in the Lincoln Creek valley near Aspen, and the same thing happened to all of them. They all took off from the aspen airport, and all had the intention of flying up the Independence Pass drainage, and out that way. The way the valley turns, it looks as if the Lincoln Creek drainage is the "main" valley. People fly into it, expecting to have a nice exit, and by the time they realize they've made a wrong turn, they're completely closed in with no hope of climbing out. Even making a wrong turn wouldn't be a huge problem if they'd climbed higher and earlier, but I guess they wanted to fly nice and close to the pretty mountains.

I could go on, but I'm sure you get the idea. Be sure of everything.
post #11 of 40
If a fixed gear is your preference, then a C206 is the nearest thing to a pickup truck! Then you can load the whole quiver and still carry 2-3 buddies along with you.
Not to mention it will handle less refined pieces of asphalt or concrete.... (you think there's a reason they use so many of them up in Alaska?)
post #12 of 40

Ultimate ski plane

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pilatus_PC-6

You wil be flying light so you can keep the aux tank in so you have greater range from more sensibly priced fuel.

Fit the skids and say good bye to the landing fees. We fly in these to get up onto the glaciers in NZ and they are awesome.

STOL and as tough as teak - I have been into and out of some rough, hot and high strips in these things.
post #13 of 40
Out of the planes you have mentioned, the one I would choose would be the fixed gear Cherokee 6. Little concern for weight and balance issues and fixed gear means less maintenance headaches and lower insurance rates.

Look closely at how many hours a year you will actually fly and you may find that a flying club is by far a better deal. Most club aircraft don't get a lot of use during the winter months so as a rule, scheduling is not a problem. I have both owned my own plane and belonged to a club. I will say that private ownership is really nice but it eats a good bit of disposal income. You know the old saying, "the happiest 2 days of boat ownership are the day you buy it and the day you sell it" applies here as well. My grandfather gave me some great advice when I was a kid. he said to me...
"Kid, if it flies, floats or f****, lease it, don't buy it." There have been several times in my life when I reflected on that and wished I followed that advice.

Now, mountain flying... If you are seriously considering using a small aircraft to fly to mountainous terrain during the winter months, I would consider an IFR rating a must. Also be prepared to sit tight when necessary for adverse weather. Winter in the mountains means quickly changing conditions and icing conditions. "get home itis" has killed a lot of pilots. Don't be one of them.

Post pics of your new ride what ever it may be.
post #14 of 40
So we have a price spread that ranges between $30k for an old Darter, $70k for a Maule .... and prollaly $300k for a Pilatus.

:

That is quite a spread even toward the middle. For east coast operation onto a paved strip as you will find by most areas you ain't gonna need skis and a true STOL.

Are costs of operation .... anyhow .... most of the STC (auto gas), trick went out with the new ethanol blends, but operation costs must be a factor as well as price?

Sport was a pretty tiny plane and the back seat was mostly token, you would have to step up to a Super III or a Sierra to get the room and hp.
post #15 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by stoweguy View Post
Out of the planes you have mentioned, the one I would choose would be the fixed gear Cherokee 6. Little concern for weight and balance issues and fixed gear means less maintenance headaches and lower insurance rates.

Look closely at how many hours a year you will actually fly and you may find that a flying club is by far a better deal. Most club aircraft don't get a lot of use during the winter months so as a rule, scheduling is not a problem. I have both owned my own plane and belonged to a club. I will say that private ownership is really nice but it eats a good bit of disposal income. You know the old saying, "the happiest 2 days of boat ownership are the day you buy it and the day you sell it" applies here as well. My grandfather gave me some great advice when I was a kid. he said to me...
"Kid, if it flies, floats or f****, lease it, don't buy it." There have been several times in my life when I reflected on that and wished I followed that advice.

Now, mountain flying... If you are seriously considering using a small aircraft to fly to mountainous terrain during the winter months, I would consider an IFR rating a must. Also be prepared to sit tight when necessary for adverse weather. Winter in the mountains means quickly changing conditions and icing conditions. "get home itis" has killed a lot of pilots. Don't be one of them.

Post pics of your new ride what ever it may be.
My flying club has T-41's, Cessna 172's and 152's and an Arrow, with really good rates. I have just been mulling over what I could get to work for me, if I went out and bought. I don't think the extra insurance and maintenance on a retract would be affordable, and when I look up the lines to the cessna 182's, and the Cherokee 235 and 6, I think I might get slaughtered on overhaul and fuel costs. The constant speed prop's seem like a good idea for mountain flying, but as far as I know only a few conversions of 172's have the CS prop, and there were a few 175's with CS props. Of course, then I will be taking my chances with a potential for a GO 300 overhaul, unless I find a conversion. I don't remember hearing about any of the others with CS props. I guess the O-320/O-360 (lycoming) class might not be enough for reasonable mountain flying, so maybe I will just fly in the summer and drive in the winter. It was an interesting thought. I haven't read too many comments here from folks who actually take there planes on ski trips, so maybe that is message enough. The only really good ski/fly location I know is Bryce, and even there one has to keep a lot of things in mind, including the lack of fuel services, as evident from last year's Zenith 601 crash. MAybe flying to ski is just not practical. It was an interesting idea, but maybe not ready for prime time.

I guess I should buckle down and get the IFR rating one of these days. I need a little more night cross country, and then the instruction. I passed an instrument/commercial ground school, with more than twenty hours of simulator time many years ago, before I passed my private license, and I actually have three college credits in air navigation from the spring of 1973, although I don't think my sextant and driftmeter skills would be as handy in a four seater as they were on the T-29. Right now it is a bigger challenge to navigate the ADIZ, and Class B, and avoid the FRZ than it is to fly near mountains.
post #16 of 40
Annapolis. Hmmm...

If you look at the economics, you're better off flying commercial. You live half an hour from BWI. You have a huge choice in nonstop Southwest flights. One to Salt Lake City, two to Albuquerque, three to Denver. Winter flying to New England is pretty ugly if you're thinking about doing it frequently on weekends. There are 10 daily flights to Manchester, NH. Those are $59.00 flights.
post #17 of 40
Look into a FG Saratoga. Lots of room and a good useful load.



Quote:
Originally Posted by lloyd braun View Post
I am learning to fly out here in Aspen.
Good for you Lloyd, I didn't know that. I've got a Commache 250.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vail snopro View Post
Aspen (ASE) does not even offer parking to singles (even if you wanted to pay for it).
We parked a TBM700 there last winter. It was expensive, 100 day and we took 150 gallons of fuel.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
A Pilatus PC-6 would be ideal!
That would be my dream plane.
post #18 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
Annapolis. Hmmm...

If you look at the economics, you're better off flying commercial. You live half an hour from BWI. You have a huge choice in nonstop Southwest flights. One to Salt Lake City, two to Albuquerque, three to Denver. Winter flying to New England is pretty ugly if you're thinking about doing it frequently on weekends. There are 10 daily flights to Manchester, NH. Those are $59.00 flights.
Although I mentioned the budget constraints, I know that it is cheaper to travel other ways. It might even be faster to drive until I get to the point where I am going to Vermont, NH or Maine, or going out west. I was just trying to see what the practical limitations would be if I started to fly to skiing destinations. The practicalities seem not to be there. I always thought that GA flying offers the most potential where the roads are not straight for good reasons, as in the mountains, or near the shore. Flying near the shore seems relatively easy, as long as you are not counting on horizons over water. Mountain flying is a skill unto itself, and deserves a measure of respect beyond convential aviating. I figured that if I asked, someone here might have real experience in flying to ski areas. We certainly have some experienced folks here. I am afraid that the practical answers seem beyond my budget, although not way beyond. I just have to keep thinking about the issues, and maybe I will figure out a way.

As yet, I haven't heard any suggestions about the travel from destination airport to ski area. Is anyone doing this, and if so, what have been your experiences?
post #19 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by FOG View Post
As yet, I haven't heard any suggestions about the travel from destination airport to ski area. Is anyone doing this, and if so, what have been your experiences?

Unfortunately, that is always the issue mountains or not. As more and more small airstrips close, GA is forced farther and farther from anywhere interesting. Small plane utility declines and it becomes a hobby only excercise.

I have pretty much given up on powered flight and am playing around with sailplanes.
post #20 of 40
And to think all I want was a large SUV....man, I am living the low-profile life! :

"Oh honey, lets just buy a vintage convertible Ferrari, and I will buy an airplane to go skiing instead of the huge Escalade"
post #21 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
And to think all I want was a large SUV....man, I am living the low-profile life! :

"Oh honey, lets just buy a vintage convertible Ferrari, and I will buy an airplane to go skiing instead of the huge Escalade"
There are a lot of used airplanes going for a lot less than a new full sized SUV, and used aircraft have to be maintained to relatively high standards. Further, even most 60 year old aircraft use engines which are still available today. Some of those engines, like the Lycoming O-320 and 360, are very popular in new aircraft. The Cessna 172, which went into production in 1956, is still in production, and is still very popular. Its performance is competitive with newer aircraft. The thrust of my posts is that I would like to buy an airplane, and since I already ski, I was trying to determine if I could use such a plane in traveling to ski areas.
post #22 of 40
Hey more power to you...I wish I could buy a plane and knew how to fly it.

Funny thing is that I am looking into a gas jet turbine engine for a project that I have in mind.
post #23 of 40
I can not imagine doing any big mountain flying with anything less than an IFR icket and a turbo unless that's where you learned to fly and/or fly frequently. Flying from the east to the Rockies VFR is tempting the fates. Any time we fly our 421 into the CO mountians we carry enough fuel to get back to Denver JIC we run into something we don't like. We've flown into Aspen, Vail, Steamboat etc. but only in the sunshine, and even then it can be a challenge for a flatlander.
post #24 of 40
When I was a 16 year old kid taking flying lessons a PC-6 came into Potsdam airport. When he took off I just stood there aghast. That damn aircraft just sprang off the ground and went about straight up. Impressive STOL. Yes, I wanted one!

post #25 of 40
A Maule can do that for a lot less money. They had an ad where the pilot does a run up in a hanger and releases the brakes and was airborne as the aircraft exited the hanger.
post #26 of 40
All things considered in an economy in decline and with rising fuel, ethanol cutting into the STC potential, a Maule seems to have a bit of attraction since there is a commercial market for the plane.

172's are perfect for chasing the "$100 hamburger" but have limited resale and I guess that would hold true for the Beech and light Piper too.

I'd place a call to an FBO like the one at Sugarloaf and have a chat with the folks up there regarding the type, days open/shut and use of a courtesy car and sort out some of the details.
post #27 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
All things considered in an economy in decline and with rising fuel, ethanol cutting into the STC potential, a Maule seems to have a bit of attraction since there is a commercial market for the plane.

172's are perfect for chasing the "$100 hamburger" but have limited resale and I guess that would hold true for the Beech and light Piper too.

I'd place a call to an FBO like the one at Sugarloaf and have a chat with the folks up there regarding the type, days open/shut and use of a courtesy car and sort out some of the details.
The probelm with Maules is that since BD died his family has raised prices like crazy. The M4-180V, which they were offering at Oshkosh in 2005 at $96,000 is now over $150,000, and it isn't even three years later. I know that fuel has had a big runup over that time, but the price runup on Maules is out of line with the rest of GA. My guess is that Maule can sell the planes overseas to folks whose currency isn't taking it in the shorts. The end result is that Maules have become pricey, especially relative to Cessna and Piper products. Further, Maules have a rough reputation with insurers, perhaps because too many of their pilots think they are super bush pilots, or something. The M-6's had some crazy thing with loss of aileron authority as they got slow and low, although I haven't heard similar stuff about the other Maules.
post #28 of 40
My uncle had a cessna 210 he used to fly out of Boulder, Colorado and it was a great mountain flying machine, flying in and out of leadville (10,000ft!) was no problem.

I don't think they come cheap though...
post #29 of 40
if you can go with a cessna 182 turbo, with the super high max altidude and the oxygen sysytem. those are sick planes, got to ride in one from seatac to pdx.
post #30 of 40
First of all, you don’t say what your experience is or what your budget is. That makes definite answers more difficult. From what little you have said, and the tone of your questions, I’ll make the best of it. Let me know what your total time is, in what airplanes, and what ratings you hold.

I don’t understand your comment on landing between snow banks having a factor on tricycle gear. Tail draggers are actually more short and rough strip friendly, but you must know what you are doing, be able to dance on the rudder pedals and have some taildragger time. I know, I know, how do you get experience without getting experience? For starters, fly em on good weather days into easy airports. Do it lots.

I’ll get this out of the way early: It is very common mistake to overestimate your abilities with an airplane. Get a lot of time in doing things that approach your limits, and take very small baby steps. Do not combine weak areas, like taking your new tail dragger that you have 25 hours in out on the snow packed runway. Tail draggers like to swap ends, and differential braking is harder on a snow packed runway. That’s the concern. The required skill is to never let the tail get even a smidge out of line. Know your crosswind limits, and know that they aren’t the same on snow. Based on the tone of your posts, don’t buy a tail dragger.

Do not consider landing on an unplowed, or plowed then drifted runway. Do not take off when there is more than an inch or two of snow, depending on field length and how wet the snow is. If it’s at all short, there should be no snow. I used to fly commercial, and our ops specs prohibited takeoff with more than an inch. Lots of potential drag there. Know what accelerate stop distances are, and keep that cushion when taking off in light snow.

Second general comment. Always, always, always leave yourself an out. That means having enough gas, enough good weather, enough altitude, enough of a ceiling, enough alternatives if something goes wrong.

While they are not directly related, if you are not comfortable night VFR, DO NOT go flying into the western mountains yet. Your skill level is not yet adequate. Gain more experience here in the east first.

Some planes have an STC available to install a baggage tube into the tailcone of the fuselage for skis, fishing poles, etc. You have to be very careful with how much weight you put there because the arm is so great. I know the V35 bonanza has this, and maybe a few others do too. There are a few baggage belly pods out there, the 206 and Cherokee 6 I believe have this available. Lots of drag, little concern on balance. Aircraft interiors are ridiculously expensive, so don’t go tearing up the upholstery stuffing burred edges, dirty skis in between the seats. Don’t forget this is an airplane, cargo should be tied down. Flying skis about the cockpit in turbulence is not a good combo.

For flying into eastern areas, forget mountain training. I don’t think that’s a factor. Especially in the winter. Think IFR. Icing. Cold starting. Terrain awareness and avoidance in IFR. The idiocy of marginal VFR in precip and cold under a lowering ceiling. The fact of the matter is between weather and icing, flights to ski areas are difficult in the winter. You need the bluebird weekend, or close to it. That can happen, and it’s fun. Just don’t expect to make it a regular thing.

I know New England well, and one of the problems is many of the ski area airports have lousy approaches. How are you at NDB approaches where procedure turns are critical to avoid hitting terrain? Or if the approach is decent, it’s a long schlep to the ski area. Are you going to leave a car up there? Not much for rental cars anywhere except Burlington, Manchester, Portland, Albany.

I skied Jay Peak once where friends picked me up in Newport, which is 40 minutes to Jay. Worked out ok, gorgeous clear March day, but the next day was cold and I couldn’t start. Had to do a jury rigged jump off a VW rabbit.

If you end up doing this, I’d plan on flying into Burlington with a nice long ILS runway, lots of support in the way of heated hangars and pre heats, and rent a car to Stowe, Smuggs, Sugarbush, etc. Get a few years experience doing that and build your instrument time. Then you will know the area and your abilities better. Maybe take some good weather trips to Morrisville, Rutland, Newport or Mt Snow if you have a friend with a car.

This is not for the faint of wallet.

It sounds like you are fairly low time. Meaning no instrument ticket and under 500 hours. If so, stay fixed gear, but consider more than 160 hp. Don’t go under 150hp. Forget about tri pacers, Cherokee 140’s, 150hp Cardinals, geared engines, or specialty aircraft that will be difficult to sell. Your first airplane is a learner, not a keeper. The Beech small singles (Musketeer, Sierra, Custom) are dogs, got my private in them, have no use for them. (Bonanza is fabulous, but I think too advanced just yet). High wing or low wing is either or. The 172/161 warrior is your bread and butter. I don't understand Yuki's comment on limited resale on 172's. They are the most marketable airplane in the world. If you have the budget, a Cherokee 180/Archer is good, as is the 182/235 Skylane/Dakota. Skyhawk XP never made sense, it was built to be a floatplane, land plane performance and cost isn’t as good as the Archer. The 206/Cherokee 6-300 are excellent. Both have the reputation that if it fits inside it will fly. Recognize that you will be burning 15gph doing 140kts, and you need to know about cylinder head temp management. If you crack an IO-520 cylinder, you will get an expensive lesson on pulling back the power too fast. The Lycomings are better on that, have higher TBO’s, but cost more to overhaul. Well operated it’s nearly a wash between the two. Turbo can be nice on performance at altitudes above 8,000 feet, a little overkill on an eastern fixed gear airplane, but scary on the wallet. Another 2GPH, higher heat loads on the engine, and there’s always the possibility of blowing the turbo. I don’t know why you’d want a constant speed prop on a 172. Useless. Not enough power to warrant it, and in that airplane you don’t want the weight or the expense.

When you do venture out west, know that performance goes down in a hurry. Stay light. Go into big airports with nice wide long runways first and get to know your way around. Taking off on a hot day is a real eye opener. Winds out there are a real concern too. Downdrafts can exceed your climb rate. Scary stuff. Take some training out there, you just can’t simulate conditions in the east well enough to impress you. I took off in a 152 I was ferrying once from Arapahoe County, just south of Denver one summer morning at 70 or 75 degrees. Just me and a few bags, full tanks, headed east, no obstacles. It took forever to get airborne, and forevermore to get a thousand feet. I remember the front range in a 182RG, only pulling 17 inches of manifold pressure and a sucky climb rate. Turbulence there can loosen your fillings. You need a serious airplane to get over the MEA’s and into a mountain strip.

You’ll find that you really need the IFR rating here in the northeast. It lets you get above a ceiling and fly direct instead of pushing marginal VFR underneath, it sharpens your basic flight skills, and it gets you home when the clouds move in. In coastal areas you have fog to add to the list. In the winter though, you rachet into the stratosphere expense wise for all weather capability. You need known icing, and that means at least a turbo Ce 210. If you scare yourself with a blown vacuum pump or an engine hiccup, you’ll be looking at Senecas, Aztecs and Barons. Those leave single engine budgets in the dust, require good engine out skills to be flown safely, and need more runway.

Another option is training to get your instrument in an easy retractable like an Arrow or Cutlass RG. You will have 40 or so hours with an instructor, and by then be well checked out on remembering to lower the gear. Don’t laugh, it happens way too often, and as a low timer your insurance rates will reflect that. Your insurance company will like the fact that your first 40-50 hours will be all dual. Then you get ~140kts on 10 GPH.

One of my personal favorites is the 182RG. 235hp Lycoming. 160 kts all day long on 13 gph. Good load carrying and good speed.

I am tired of reading about continued flight into marginal visibility and hitting terrain or spinning out of control. So don’t become a statistic. Get the IFR rating. You need to build the hours anyway.

I know a lot of pilots and airplane owners. Hardly anyone flies to ski. Those that do have houses up there, park a car at the airport, don’t carry skis, skis are already up there, and fly on the weekends that they can. They generally own more sophisticated airplanes.

I have flown nearly every piston airplane made by the big 3, have several thousand hours and an ATP, and have flown all over the country. Let me know if you have any more questions.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › General Aviation Plane for ski transport