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Change frame?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
So I just picked up a Iron Horse hard tail about 3 months ago, and I am already thinking about switching frames to either a full suspension or a lighter weight hardtail. It is a great setup, but I think I bought the frame a little large. I went with a 19.5 (L), which is what I was sized for in a Gary Fisher. I am 6'0" 200lbs. What are some good frames that I should take a look at? I ride XC with most of my time spent on rocky terrain with plenty of roots. I have upgraded forks to a Fox Float 32 RLC and X.9 components. The bike also came with hydraulic brakes. The shop changed something in the fork so that it has 100mm travel, but can be changed back to 120-140mm. I have looked at a few Kona frames on Ebay. I really liked the Gary Fisher frames that I looked at too.
post #2 of 14
That sounds like a nice setup. Have you tried adjusting the saddle, seat post, stem, or handle bars to correct your fit issue?
post #3 of 14
Can you post up the dimensions of the Iron Horse? I'm a little suprised that the Iron Horse would be big. Gary Fisher frames typically have long top tubes, making people feel 'stretched out'.

I use Large Gary Fisher frames, we are about the same size.

Try a shorter stem?

Make sure you don't get too much travel on the fork. This will make the head angle 'too slack', the bike won't climb well.
post #4 of 14
Thread Starter 
I am going to mess with the setup today to see what that does.
post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
size HA SA EffTT CS WB BB

19.5” 70.3° 73° 23.07” 17.13” 42.10” 11.7”
The fork has the same travel as the one that was taken off.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnnys Zoo View Post
Can you post up the dimensions of the Iron Horse? I'm a little suprised that the Iron Horse would be big. Gary Fisher frames typically have long top tubes, making people feel 'stretched out'.

I use Large Gary Fisher frames, we are about the same size.

Try a shorter stem?

Make sure you don't get too much travel on the fork. This will make the head angle 'too slack', the bike won't climb well.
post #6 of 14
If you're thinking of picking up a Gary Fisher frame be sure to avoid the Sugar models....they keep popping up on eBay. Their design just didn't work right resulting in chain sag. They replaced it with the Cake model which works much better.

Kona frames are great for the price. They are very solid. You'll find they run a pound or two heavier than similar frames from Gary Fisher, Trek, etc.
post #7 of 14
There are always good deals on Jamis XLT frames on eBay as well.
post #8 of 14
Still losing me...23.07 top tube length is about 60 cm

Gary Fish's Big Sur top tube 62.79cm in Large

http://www.fisherbikes.com/bike/model/big-sur/geometry

Gary Fish's Genesis Geometry probably isn't the best place to start for size.

Unless you have very short legs and a very long torso a large should fit.

One of the things about a hardtail bike is they tend to have longer stems. This puts you in a tighter crouch with extended arms. This is more of an XC race position. This position may make the bike feel too big for someone who wants to sit more upright.
post #9 of 14
How it goin?

I was thinking you could also try a steeper rise stem, or a short riser bar.
post #10 of 14
Thread Starter 
I did some adjusting of the seat and the handle bars and the bike feels a lot more comfortable. I still think I would like to switch to a full suspension frame towards the middle or end of summer. Any thoughts on that?
post #11 of 14
I have 2 full suspension bikes, a hardtail, and a road bike. How can a person have just one?

I was attempting to be a minimalist, it didn't work.

I might sell my Cake later, not sure yet.

If you ride a lot of rough terrain, it is hard to beat full suspension.
post #12 of 14
I have two great hardtails that are sitting around because of my full suspension bikes. When I got my full suspension bikes I thought I would still use my hardtails for riding around town on the streets and trails since the trails aren't very bumpy. I've found that the full suspension bikes are so smooth on the trails (and thus less wearing on me) that I prefer them even for putting around town. About the only time my hardtails get out are on long treks where their lighter weight and higher efficiency makes up for the less comfortable ride.
post #13 of 14
Just got my first FS bike this year 6X5 Stumpy FSR. And I ended up keeping my trek HT and converting it to a rigid SS. I like them both and ride both. But i ride the stumpy more than the trek.

Before the stumpy the trek was my only bike and I found that on the HT longer 15+ mile rides on technical terrain were just too painful over the long haul and I couldn't ride as frequently as I wanted to. With the FS, I can ride every day if I want with out the beating.

I still really like the HT now as a rigid SS bike. I use it mostly for commuting and the occasional trail ride. Its a lot of fun for both.
post #14 of 14
Hi,
Glad to hear that adjusting your saddle etc. resulted in a better fit. I too was surprised you thought it might be too large. Keep in mind that if you shorten the top tube dimension that you might feel more comfortable up front BUT when you start to climb, especially a steeper section, the bike will feel as if it is going to loose tracking off the front wheel and in effect roll backwards, as in doing a wheelie!

I'm personally still a hard tail guy but there are certain sections of bumpy slightly downhill terrain that my FS cohorts are able to blast through while pedaling that I have to coast and I lose ground even though I might be the stronger rider. I usually catch on the ups... Of course FS is far superior to what it was just several seasons ago. Also, I'd get disc brakes if I was out west. Here in Michigan it would depend on how much sloppy weather or wet/damp trails I'd be riding if I were to consider discs. When I did the Leadville Trail 100 a few years ago my rims were toasting on the descents without discs. I even believe the flats I got were heat related but I may never know because I didn't save the tubes to inspect them.

So, if you are riding rugged terrain and/or long descents and you like the feel of a FS on climbing and only want one bike, sell the IH.
EJ
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