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Is Skiing Getting Too Expensive??

post #1 of 57
Thread Starter 
While helping to dress a group of young skiers, one of our children's instructors asked a class of 5-year-olds, “What is the one thing that you need to have in order to go outside and ski?” A small girl stood up and said, “A credit card.”
post #2 of 57
it's not "too expensive" if it's your priority

if you're a casual skier, I'm sure it's expensive for you. but then again, so is polo.

anyone who thinks it's "too expensive" probably shouldn't be skiing.
post #3 of 57
If I had to kick out the 50$ everytime I wanted to ski, it would seem expensive. but the 500$ for a pass makes it seem so much cheaper. As I write this im suddenly adding up my ski bill for this year alone, skis, clothes, gas, hut trips, ............... OH MY GOD.........skiing is very expensive. i probably kick out 2-4 grand a year.
post #4 of 57
You have to know the right people, shop for deals, and make opportunities for yourself. I've skied 40 days this season, and payed full price for one of them. I've only payed something for about 8- I get the rest through my job as an instructor, by knowing other instructors, by hitting hills on discount days, by being on a race team, etc. I shop at end of season sales and look for previous model year equipment. With brand new Rossignol 9s SL skis adn bindings and a brand new marker jacket, I think I've spent maybe $500 this year, which isn't bad when you consider that there are some hobbies (paintball, mountain biking, golf, etc.) where you can easily spend that just to get started in the sport, let alone fees for everytimeyou go out and do it (green fees for golf, paint for paintball, and ER bills for Mountian Biking). Try a little harder, skimp on the ski vacations each year, and get yourself into some sort of program like PSIA or NASTAR where you can get some discounted lift tickets.
post #5 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by gonzostrike:
it's not "too expensive" if it's your priority

if you're a casual skier, I'm sure it's expensive for you. but then again, so is polo.

anyone who thinks it's "too expensive" probably shouldn't be skiing.
Before I read this reply, I was thinking exacly the same thing, including the reference to polo. Scary.
post #6 of 57
I can't think of anything else that I would rather spend money on.

I love the rush and challenge of skiing and I love buying toys.

It's a match made in heaven.

[img]smile.gif[/img]

As for season passes, we get screwed in the Northeast.
post #7 of 57
expensive? Get into the industry... Instruct, adjust bindings, serve food, shovel resort sidewalks, assist lift riders, patrol, sell tickets, clean rooms in the lodge, man the front desk, do paperwork, any job you can find for the weekend will usually get you free riding. My only advice? When interviewed about your motivations, don't say "free ticket", unless they name it as a job benefit specifically, say you love the sport and want to get involved with it any way you can.
post #8 of 57
But what about the other 99% of the public who just come to ski?

...Ott
post #9 of 57
Good point, Ott.

And the underlying assumption is that you can ski in your own neighborhood, more or less.
post #10 of 57
If you think skking in the States is expensive - you should try resort skiing in Australia - OH MY GOD!. Season pass is $AU915 - and remember we only have four month seasons - usually good snow for 8-10 weeks of that.

THEN you've got to pay Resort entry charge of $25/day per car. IT's VERY expensive here because we have so few quality mountains. (6 major resorts in the whole country). Oh well.
post #11 of 57
Ski equipment - it's very difficult to envision a consumer owned manufacturing organization capable of producing the great skis, boots, bindings and clothing that we have available today. On the other hand, there are so many ways of buying equipment for not much money, so equipment may be less of an issue.

Most ski resorts are businesses for whom the reason for being is making money. Period.

Some, like Mad River Glen and (I think) Bridger Bowl are owned by the consumers, and their reason for being is to please the customer/owners. Perhaps they're more affordable for many.

Everything pleasurable isn't within reach of everyone. Skiing is within reach of everyone to whom it is a priority, one way or another.

This issue has been discussed here previously. To me, it's a red herring.

[ February 18, 2004, 08:34 PM: Message edited by: oboe ]
post #12 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by oboe:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by gonzostrike:
it's not "too expensive" if it's your priority

if you're a casual skier, I'm sure it's expensive for you. but then again, so is polo.

anyone who thinks it's "too expensive" probably shouldn't be skiing.
Before I read this reply, I was thinking exacly the same thing, including the reference to polo. Scary. </font>[/quote]: : : : : : :

Oh yes, SCARY!
post #13 of 57
The discrepancy in skiing participation across the different socioeconomic classes should prove without much doubt that skiing, for most people, is WAY too expensive to even consider.
post #14 of 57
I wish my skiing habit was costing me about 3 times as much. 'Cuz, that would mean I'm getting to go skiing about 3 times as much as I am now.

The wife went skiing with the 2 boys and I a few weeks ago and complained about the cost when I paid about $125 for 4 lift tickets. We ate a picnic lunch and skied from 9 to 5. The next day we all went to a movie, got drinks and popcorn, and stopped for dinner on the way home. Total cost for movie, snacks, and dinner was about $125 and we were out approx. 4 hours. I think being outside all day, getting some exercise as a family was a much better bargain than the movie and dinner, at least in my eyes.
post #15 of 57
Skiing + college = absolutely no money
post #16 of 57
I'll second that skibum2424
post #17 of 57
It depends is the best I can say.

For me, I own my equipment so I have to amortize the cost over the years of use. I don't spend much on an average or annual basis. I buy a shell and wear it for 10 to 15 years at a minimum. I just don't care to be fashionable. I buy equipment either on my proform or late season and frequently used demo gear so it is cheap (skis and binding for about $300 and they last perhaps 3 years). Boots last me forever (my current pair are from about 91 and have new zipfit liners meaning they will last another 15 years or until the boot plastic breaks).

I suspect that my costs are about $200 to 300 per year, plus transportation and lift ticket costs.

Lift tickets are $48 for a day/night ticket, which is equal to 14 hours or about $3.5 per hour.

Transportation costs are mileage dependent but mine are about $35 per day at .30 per mile and 60 miles each way.

At 30 days per year, my costs are less than $100 per day per ski day for all costs (at daily ticket rates, not at season pass rates) or a little more than $6.50 per hour. Season pass rates cut the ticket cost to about $.70 per hour.

Is this too much? How much should it be?

I agree that for the first timer it is expensive. But for the long time skier, it is not. Where else can you find this kind of recreation/entertainment for $.70 cent per hour?

Mark
post #18 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by graeme:
The discrepancy in skiing participation across the different socioeconomic classes should prove without much doubt that skiing, for most people, is WAY too expensive to even consider.
fOck your political correctness. I expect to make no more than $15,000 in 2004. I make skiing a priority. we have NO obligation to make it "affordable," no matter what your bleedin' friggin' heart might insist.
post #19 of 57
How do you measure pleasure? Try big game fishing for an "expensive" sport.
post #20 of 57
How much does it cost per hour to play tennis?
post #21 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by Karsten Hain:
expensive? .... My only advice? When interviewed about your motivations, don't say "free ticket", unless they name it as a job benefit specifically, say you love the sport and want to get involved with it any way you can.
No chance I would hire you, I'd know you weren't telling the truth.
post #22 of 57
Quote:
Skiing + college = absolutely no money
I don't understand this one a bit. My wallet says my daughters skiing + college is incredibly expensive.
post #23 of 57
Gonz, I do not think it was PC, rather a simple statement.
I too consider it too expensive, but I am willing to sacrifice something else, or work harder (i.e. more extra hours) to raise the money to take me and my kids to the snow.
So, I don't travel around the world, stay put at home instead of going to fancy restaurants, don't go to see movies..and so on. As soon as I'll be able to staiblize my financial situation, well, I'll ski more.
Keep it in mind that I totalized 10 days this season (multipy it by three as expenses go), and am seen as someone who skis a lot (considering that I have a family)
post #24 of 57
Yes
post #25 of 57
Between buying gear, staying at resorts, lift tickets, and apre ski for the entire family of four I have put us in debt up to our eyeballs. My headstone will read:

"I wish I had spent more time skiing"

: : :
post #26 of 57
I'll respond to this post from somewhat of an "outsiders" point of view. I live in Arkansas. Skied for the first time over Thanksgiving 2003. I have fallin in love with the sport. I had been to Colorado several times Elk and Deer Hunting and absolutely love the Rockies. My hobbies in Arkansas are Duck and Deer Hunting and Golf. Let me break down those cost. Duck Lease $1,000; Deer Lease $350. Golf Dues $25/month plus about 15-20 per round. Guns, shells, golf balls, clothing....shall I continue. Point is you spend your money on what you love to do. My thankgiving trip to fly to Denver, rent a car, condo, lift tickets, lessons, etc was over $3,000...I am returning from a spring break trip but will be driving this time. Cost savings to drive is about $1200. So if I were to take simply 2 ski trips a year were talking 5 GRAND for about 6-8 days of skiing. We are talking about $700 per ski day for myself, my wife, and 10 year old son to ski. So YES for me skiing is expensive. HOWEVER, you spend your money on what you enjoy. If you can't afford it, don't go. Many resorts offer discount packages but they are at times when it is impossible for families to take advantage of. I could go on and on but I think you see my point.
post #27 of 57
Is skiing expensive? No doubt. But judging by the number of people on the slopes (here in the East anyway), maybe it's not expensive enough. [img]graemlins/evilgrin.gif[/img]
post #28 of 57
I thought it was a rhetorical question. :
post #29 of 57
I'm a volunteer ski patroller on the weekends, so I get a free family pass. My son and I go up every Saturday, I pack my lunch and bring a thermos of tea and buy a pepsi and the paper at a quick stop on the way up. I give my son $5 walking-around money, he and his buddies maintain a locker full of ramen which they "cook up" by bumming hot water from the cafeteria line. Since we arrive very early, the kids help the cafeteria workers set up the lodge tables and they get free breakfast. I spring for drinks candy and doughnuts on the way home, another $10, tops. My ski day costs me less than $20, total. I get deals on gear by being on the Patrol, usually half or less of retail, I go to the summer sale at Burton and get stuff insanely cheap. I have bought good poles for $2 at the Salvation Army, they charge $5 for boots and skis. I actually bought boots there once, which I used for 2 seasons. I outfitted my kid some years ago for $40 total at a fall ski swap. Before I was on the Patrol, I bought season passes el cheapo during the summer.

Yesterday me and my son with 2 buddies took a ski trip up to Jay Peak. I got a free comp pass, my son got one for $20 by flashing his Smuggs pass, one buddy had a season pass to Sugarbush, so he flashed that and got a $20 pass, the other paid $30 Vermonter teenage price. We packed food, but bought a few food items. The total outlay for the 4 of us was less than $100 for a great day. We maxed the lifts out with first and last chairs.

I've never skied Stowe, even though I live nearby, because they won't give a break on a pass. Likewise, I've never skied Killington. I don't think my son could maintain a ramen locker at either place. I've skied Mad River because once a year they do lift tickets for the 1948 price ($3.50), if you dress up in old ski clothes.

Likewise, I golf on the cheap, no country clubs for me. If it's $30 or more, I don't tee it up. I play with found balls, I paid $100 for homemade clubs.
post #30 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by gonzostrike:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by graeme:
The discrepancy in skiing participation across the different socioeconomic classes should prove without much doubt that skiing, for most people, is WAY too expensive to even consider.
fOck your political correctness. I expect to make no more than $15,000 in 2004. I make skiing a priority. we have NO obligation to make it "affordable," no matter what your bleedin' friggin' heart might insist.</font>[/quote]That's the best of Gonz - not liberal, not conservative, not politically correct. He's right, though, and I agree with the import of his post.
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