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Ski Recommendation : Powder Ski (Leaving soon)

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
Hi All, I'm moving out to New Zealand from Quebec for their winter and I am interested in buying a pair of powder skis.

I received an instructor position I applied for and want to make sure I can actually properly ski the mountain and not look like a fool. So I mesure 5'11'' 154bs and I'm fairly comfortable with any pair of skiis, but I'm looking for all mountain versatility out of a powder ski. In other words I was looking for a medium radius turner, with good float capability, medium stiffness (for performance and float). With that in mind I have no clue where to start I dont know the field of powder skis and I've never demoed any although I dont mind.

Where would the Rossi Bandit stand in this? Any last years recommendations would be appreciated too.
post #2 of 25
What mountain you working at?

Depending on when you fly and how Canadian you feel you could speak to Prior when they get back from their break on 03 Jun and get a pair of their Doughboy or Originals depending on how fat you feel you want to go.

That way you get 2009 top sheets as well, get a pair of Dukes on Pro (if you can can) and then sell them to a Kiwi when you leave at the end of the season.
post #3 of 25
post #4 of 25
well that depends on what you mean by a "powder" ski. also, you really need to tell us more about your ability level and current skis. is this going to be part of a quiver?

if you ALREADY have skis for firm snow, then let me recommend:

1) volkl gotama (176 or 183... they ski short due to the twin tip)
2) line prophet 100 (179)


if you are only going to have one ski and are asking about the bandit because you've never skied a wide(-ish) ski and don't think that they can still be versatile, then i would suggest:

1) fischer watea 94 (178)
2) salomon sandstorm/gun (the sandstorm is a slightly beefed up version of the gun without the twin tip... 173/174)
3) dynastar big trouble (176)
4) volkl bridge (177)
5) armada arv (175)
6) head mojo 90 (176)
7) line prophet 90/chronic blend (the chronic blend is a slightly more "freestyle" version of the prophet 90... slightly softer wood core and slightly forward mount...179/179)

if you really just mean an all-mountain ski that will be acceptable in powder, then look at:

1) k2 pe (174)
2) fischer watea 84 (176)

i recommended these skis based on a lot of assumptions. i have no idea what the snow in NZ is like, and i don't know what skis you already have, what preferences you have, or how you ride. i just assumed that since you were asking this question, that you aren't really a HARD-charging skier, so i left a lot of viable options off the list. if you give us more information, i could narrow it down for you a lot.

and if you couldn't tell already, based on the number of skis that i could easily recommend from each category, unless you have more skis, are an expert skier, or the snow in NZ really sucks, then i clearly think you should go with the middle category.
post #5 of 25
Where are you working?
post #6 of 25
i just realized that this will probably be primarily an instructing ski, in which case i would definitely not go for any of the fattest skis, and might even steer you more towards the narrowest category of skis that i recommended
post #7 of 25
Please don't buy the Bandits- at least not the B94s, I demoed them at Mary Jane in Jan and if pure hatred could delam a ski, there's be pieces of 'em all over Parson's bowl... They were the "deadest feeling" ski I have ever been on. Otherwise if you want a midfat, try looking at the Watea 84, the Head Mojo 90, the Line Prophet 90 and maybe the Mythic Rider. All of those will do you well in pretty much all conditions. Have fun skiing when we're all getting sunburns!
post #8 of 25
Never been to NZ, but people from there tell me that conditions are really variable and that true powder days (like we have out west) are pretty infrequent in resort areas there. I'd lean towards the Mojo 90. Dynastar BT is a good choice too. Go with a 90 - 95 width and wood core.
post #9 of 25
Thread Starter 
So to reply to some of the responses, I'll start with the past experience. Been teaching four years, coaching for two seasons. I see myself as not being scared of changing conditions and I make my skis work for me. I have currently Rossi FS scratch that have a 95mm waist so a mid fat-fattie wouldnt be much change. However they are heavy I need a lighter more agile ski for powder and crud conditions. Other than that I own an old pair of Atomic 9:18's and race stock Fischers Worldcup SL.

Ultimately mid-fat sounds like it would be what I'm looking for as I am The Fischers I own are turny bastards and I love that because I can work the crap of of them, but when I hit crud they struggle ( of course ) but thats why i'm here.

I'm going to start looking at suggestions now, as I appreciate it. But does anyone else have anything more?
post #10 of 25
Powder in NZ has to be taken with a pinch of salt. Yes there is 50 cm of fresh snow (on occassion) in fact we had one such day at Treble Cone last season (but it was a Saturday so I did not ski it - do not ski weekends unless it is truly epic or I am working - but that is another story).

From a Colorado POV it was not powder. From an Alta 04 Feb 2008 (27" as part of a 96" week) it was certainly not powder.

We did get a couple of 4-5" days where the snow was lighter than wet cement.

Was it deep? - yes, was it fun? - yes (well a similar day the previous season was).

The mountain was frozen trenches the following day (I was up there fore running a GS race) and not fun at all.

So does NZ get lots of deep wet cement on occassion? - yes
Does it get lots of deep UT/CO/WY/MT type powder on occassion? - if it does I have never seen it.

Does a big fat ski have a place in the NZ quiver? Of course it does, even if it is just to make skiing the wetter deeper snow or heli skiing or side country more fun.

I have a sensible ski (Rotor 169cm 124/76/109 R14m) for teaching/ general skiing and I have the love of my life for everything else (including almost every day off regardless of snow conditions as they represent fun skiing): Stockli DP Pro 193 cm 125/94/111 R31.3

Does the DP Pro do everything superbly - not really but it does most things well and it is super stable going mach stupid and I have fun on it so I do not care.

I am adding a Prior Doughoy 183cm to my quiver as my AT ski and an Overlord 193cm as my huge powder ski (with Dukes). But only because Stockli do not make anything fatter (and a bit more forgiving - DP Pro is big mountain not powder).

Each to their own - but I would take your favourite teaching/ general skiing ski and a 'powder/ big mountain' ski so you can get the most out of all conditions and the most out of your trip.

If you can get both with 2009 top sheets there is a good chance that you can sell them for a half way decent price at the end of the season and not have to carry them back.

PS. Get your boots sorted before you go as boots are extremely expensive in NZ.
post #11 of 25
Thread Starter 
And right. I will be working at Porter Heights on the south island of New Zealand. Near Mt. Hutt and city of Christchurch.

http://www.skiporters.co.nz/
post #12 of 25
If this is a ski to teach on, I've seen a lot of instructors out west on high 80's-100 skis like Volkl Bridges, Rossi Squads, and Dynastar MR's or Big Troubles, a few on Sugar Daddies, Dynastar PR's, and Volkl Mantras. Haven't seen any on Goats or Scotts, which is odd to me since I think they'd do well across the whole mountain, but maybe too wide and soft for some apps.

The Prior idea is also good, although I'd go with the Original (92 mm I think) rather than the Doughboy, which IMO is very fun but very specialized. Nice sandwich/carbon construction in all, very damp and strong, but soft topsheets get whipped in a hurry. I asked them, they said that the 09's will be the same as the 08's.
post #13 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
If this is a ski to teach on, I've seen a lot of instructors out west on high 80's-100 skis like Volkl Bridges, Rossi Squads, and Dynastar MR's or Big Troubles, a few on Sugar Daddies, Dynastar PR's, and Volkl Mantras. Haven't seen any on Goats or Scotts, which is odd to me since I think they'd do well across the whole mountain, but maybe too wide and soft for some apps.

The Prior idea is also good, although I'd go with the Original (92 mm I think) rather than the Doughboy, which IMO is very fun but very specialized. Nice sandwich/carbon construction in all, very damp and strong, but soft topsheets get whipped in a hurry. I asked them, they said that the 09's will be the same as the 08's.
But the new topsheets look sweet: www.priorskis.com/winter2009
post #14 of 25
Praxis
Bro Model
Dynastar XXL
Lotus
post #15 of 25
You sure you want a fat Utah-style ski to teach there? NZ is not a powder paradise (many days tend toward very firm) and you'll be teaching on the easy groomers 90% of the time anyway. Perhaps you might reconsider whether a dedicated powder ski is the right tool for the job. My 78-cm K2 Recons were perfect for me there last year.
post #16 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by MTskier View Post
Praxis
Bro Model
Dynastar XXL
Lotus
WRONG
maybe...
WRONG
WRONG

personally, i did not like the light weight of the 188 bro softs that i demoed in solitude, but i could see why some people would. i almost cannot express how wrong all those other skis would be for his application (and i own and LOVE the xxl's, btw)
post #17 of 25
Porter Heights is a club field, right?

Order a Kingswood Archetype and pick it up when you arrive. Save your scratch for teaching. Or- just leave it home all together. I can't see skiing anything other than a 100waist on a daily basis at the clubs.

At least, that's what I plan on doing for my next season in NZ.

Guys, check out the site. The XXL is a great suggestion, imo.
post #18 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by mike_m View Post
You sure you want a fat Utah-style ski to teach there? NZ is not a powder paradise (many days tend toward very firm) and you'll be teaching on the easy groomers 90% of the time anyway. Perhaps you might reconsider whether a dedicated powder ski is the right tool for the job. My 78-cm K2 Recons were perfect for me there last year.
Good sense from someone else who has worked out there and knows the difference between powder and NZ 'powder'.

Something 72-85mm underfoot would be far more sensible for teaching.

But if you want to go fat for your days off. There have been lots of good suggestions - I would say that you will have more chance selling a 'cache' ski rather than last season's big brand at the end of the NZ season though. Go with what works for you and what you can get the best deal on.

That said if you cannot hook something up - Kingswood make an excellent ski and you will be just down the road from them.
post #19 of 25
Porters - cool! I spent 2 seasons working in ski hire there when I left high school, good times. The mountain changed ownership last year and it is now officially called Porters rather than Porter Heights. It is a fully commercial field by the way, the club fields are all down the road (which you will DEFINITELY want to visit on your days off).

So firstly, the sort of snow to expect... well you know how east coast US gets wet, heavy coastal snow because they are right next to the ocean? Well NZ is sandwiched between 2 sizeable bodies of water, you can see the Pacific Ocean from the top of Porters. It doesn't even get super cold like Canada either, so by North American standards we don't get powder as such. Wider skis are benefitial, not so much because of float but rather it helps prevent catching an outside edge in crusty snow.

For actual instructing it doesn't really matter what you use because you will be spending the vast majority of your time with school kids on the beginner slopes. In your off time however you will want something 100ish at the waist, moderately stiff and mini-rocker is useful to prevent tip-dive in variable conditions. You really basically need a crud destroying machine which can cope with breakable crust. I just got a set of obSETHed for that very purpose as my everyday ski, but Kingswood skis are built for the conditions and are great skis.

Definitely do not go reverse sidecut, you will need edges here, even on best powder day.

Ultimately though the decision comes down to what skis do you want to destroy? The average life expectancy of skis in NZ (especially if you are skiing early season) is 1-2 seasons. The rocks here are VICIOUS, not the friendly granite you are used to but sharp, P-tex destroying instruments of doom. Make friends with the ski techs, you will need them.

And did I say you will DEFINITELY want to head to the club fields on your days off? Don't bother with Mt Hutt unless you really want to ski more groomers. Start off at Broken River and once you are comfortable with that head over to Craigieburn and if you want a real alpine experience with no crowds try Temple Basin. Lift-accessed backcountry is the best way to describe Temple.
post #20 of 25
The skis I see good skiers using along the Craigieburn Range (which is where Porters, Broken River, Craigieburn all are) include:

Seth Viscious
Kingswood
Mantra
Monster 88
Scratch BC

Previous comments about snow quality and rock sharpness have been spot on...

See ya there!
grum
post #21 of 25
No one has ever talked about this exact same topic before. Ever.
post #22 of 25
Thread Starter 
My next question to you kiwi's and barkers would be: What is the best way to ship skiis internationally? I called DHL Worldwide Express and they quoted me 700$ and I prompted forgot that idea.
post #23 of 25
When I enquired about getting skis here from the US I was quoted US$115 from an online store, not sure what freight company or method that was.

The best way is to take them with you when you fly over here.
post #24 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rigaudripper View Post
My next question to you kiwi's and barkers would be: What is the best way to ship skiis internationally? I called DHL Worldwide Express and they quoted me 700$ and I prompted forgot that idea.
They quoted that kind of figure to us as well.

We shipped the reverse direction but this guy is the best:

Dean at info@nzbaggagemovers.co.nz
www.nzbaggagemovers.co.nz

We sent our skis in a Sportube PM me if you want more detail.

Flying from North America you are allowed 2 x 23 kg bags and one 7kg carry on.

As you are going to be working near Christchurch you do not have to worry about internal NZ flights (as they are the worst excess baggage bastards in the world).

Worst case you can send one of your bags (again up to 23kg) as unaccompanied which should cost no more than $160 to NZ. You will have the pfaff of collecting it from freight and will have to clear it with customs who may need convincing that you shouldn't have to pay duty.

Best bet is to travel with your Sportube/ ski bag and enough clothes ot survive/ free ski, carry on your boots and laptop. and send any other non essential clothing as unaccompanied.
post #25 of 25
Thread Starter 
So I think I decided I'm going to try and pick up a pair of Volkl Mantra's or Fischer Watea 94's. Because their light with enough waist width but not too much, and they seem to be good on both groomers and in the float. Maybe 170-178cm region of any year.

If anyone can help me out on where to get a good deal on 170-178cm range of any year with or without bindings that'd be sweet.
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