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I need a new toys...I mean tools

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
I was wondering what everyones picks for fixed angle edge file guides under $30 would be.

I want decent fixed angle file guides probably 1, 2, and 3 degree.

I don't want to spend more than $30 each.

Anyone have a favorite? Thought it might be a good idea to post up here before I sink $90+ into some guides.

Thanks!
post #2 of 18

My personal faves are...

... the SVST Pro Edge Bevel guides.
You really can't go wrong with them. They are precise and well made. If you don't wan't to buy individual ones for all of the bevel angles, you can buy just one, and add the shims that they make to increase the angle.
All in all, very good quality tools, as is most everything that SVST makes.
JMTCW

Mike
post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 
If you use the shims are they as accurate as the single fixed guides?

If I go this route with the shims, should I buy the set screw fixator? Or will a spring clamp hold the guide, file and shim secure?
post #4 of 18
I have one SVST edge guide and many shims that allow me to choose my angle. Eveything is machined from billet so its as accurate as its going to be...but I admit I have not measured anything to confirm accuracy.

I forgot who..maybe Swix, but there is at least one other comany that is now making similar setups as the SVST sytem.
post #5 of 18
Try Sidecut... They have some of the best stuff in the buisness

Sidecut.com
post #6 of 18
If you buy the SVST kit with the 90 deg guide and 1,2,3 deg shims, it's probably the most economical combination. There's usually a pretty good discount on the kit compared to buying separately.

A simple spring clamp works fine.
post #7 of 18
SVST works just fine. very high quality not too expensive. Don't go cheap as you will just be replacing cheap stuff. SVST guides don't wear out.
post #8 of 18
to be more efficient you may not want to buy a 90 degree. You will probably never use the 90 or the 91 by itself.

So, I would buy a 91 & a 92. Most if not all of my skis but 1 pair are set to 93 (3 Degree side edge)

That way you could have a 91 if you want.

But you can also use combos of guides and shims so you don't have to change stones so often

For example

the 91 with a 1 shim and have 2, 92's

the 91 with a 2 shim and the 92 with a 1 shim and you have 2, 93's.

the 91 with a 3 shim and the 92 with a 2 shim and you have 2, 94's.

the 92 with a 3 shim and you have a 95 for backfiling.

You only need strong spring clips even with the shims. SVST's screw clamp is a waste of money and very inconvenient.
post #9 of 18
Thread Starter 
Yes, I was wondering about the 90 degree guide. Pretty much exactly what Atomicman has seemingly verified.

I want good stuff. I just don't do the amount of tuning that would justify buying $60+ guides.

I also don't like it when I'm getting my 'tuning lessons' and, I pull out a tool, and my 'instructor' says "throw that away," or "you should try and sell that."

The guy really is an arse. But he is excellent at tuning. He does let me use some of his stuff. But, I'm not sinking 5+ grand into tuning gear. So, I'm willing to put up with his Franco-American ancestry.
post #10 of 18
I agree with A-man, I have a 91 and several shims, no need for a 90...I would probably start with a 92 if I were to buy it again.

Tip with the screw on clamp, the useless plastic cap on the screw can be pulled off, underneath is a regular hex nut that will work much better when tightened with a hex key.
post #11 of 18
I have a 92 + a 1 degree shim. I didn't realise there was a little nick along one edge of my stainless steel contact plate and I scratched the base of my first ski pretty badly. I now use masking tape (don't have any ski tape yet) and check the plate thoroughly. I will probably buy individual guides instead of shims now that I can think of other uses like jig alignment... beyond just skis
post #12 of 18
Skid, just sand that scratch on the stainless down. Also I think SVST has a lifetime warranty on those tools. Give them a call.
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skid View Post
I have a 92 + a 1 degree shim. I didn't realise there was a little nick along one edge of my stainless steel contact plate and I scratched the base of my first ski pretty badly. I now use masking tape (don't have any ski tape yet) and check the plate thoroughly. I will probably buy individual guides instead of shims now that I can think of other uses like jig alignment... beyond just skis
I always use base tape when woking on my side edges. Also a real handy piece to have at your bench is a cheap paint brush. I sweep the ski and tool with it before each pass
post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
Skid, just sand that scratch on the stainless down. Also I think SVST has a lifetime warranty on those tools. Give them a call.
With the various stone I now have, knocking down that nick is EASY :P I am very happy with the SVST guide... almost make me want to put the Final Cut on my next purchase list. I am using the Beast, but I think the constant rubbing against the sharp edge is going to alter the angle somewhat.

Quote:
I always use base tape when woking on my side edges. Also a real handy piece to have at your bench is a cheap paint brush. I sweep the ski and tool with it before each pass
My daughter's old baby bibs are finally handy!
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
Tip with the screw on clamp, the useless plastic cap on the screw can be pulled off, underneath is a regular hex nut that will work much better when tightened with a hex key.
RR thanks for this tip - I like the screw-on clamp better than spring clips but a hex key would be far better than the plastic piece.
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ts01 View Post
RR thanks for this tip - I like the screw-on clamp better than spring clips but a hex key would be far better than the plastic piece.
Are you referring to this knob having a hex bolt (current method)?



Inox squares have an allen (hex) screw accessible from the top:



I think both spring clamps & screw clamps have their pros and cons, work fine and are both good to have around. It's probably about what you get used to. A small cam clamp (think bike quick release) would be optimal.

SW Blog entry:

Quote:
To provide secure attachments of diamonds, files or stones, to dedicated guides, spring or beveler clamps are necessary. The spring clamp can be quickly squeezed and repositioned while the beveler clamp requires the tightening and loosening of the thumb screw. The beveler clamp fits in the hand nicely while the spring clamp may feel awkward and in the way until you get used it’s shape and you find a comfortable position.
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
Are you referring to this knob having a hex bolt (current method)?



:
Yep under that plastic nob is a regular hex screw just like the inox. Ofcourse you could simply go to the hardware store and buy one to replace the ineffective hand tightening thumb screw nob.
post #18 of 18
Good to know. Thanks.
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