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Völkl Mantra vs. Völkl Gotama - Page 2

post #31 of 46
Thread Starter 
@AndrewR: Interesting alternative too. A friend told me about the Superchargers from Nordica. The Enforcer or the Blower, I only thought they were just to demanding (more a thing for experts). Isn't that right?
post #32 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedCap View Post
@AndrewR: Interesting alternative too. A friend told me about the Superchargers from Nordica. The Enforcer or the Blower, I only thought they were just to demanding (more a thing for experts). Isn't that right?
i would say that the enforcer is probably more demanding than the gotama; something very akin to the mantra.

but the blower, i hear, suffers from a lack of... how shall i put this? "OOMPH!" as in, it doesn't have the testicular fortitude for when the goings get not-so-good-going. all hear-say, though...
post #33 of 46
I am also 6', level 8 and weigh a bit more - 220lbs. This past winter I demoed 184 Matra's for a week at Whistler in the Pacific northwest. The skis , as others have described, had good edge hold on soft to medium firm groomers and stable at speed while making GS turns. On hard pack the edge hold was only moderate and the tips wandered at speed. The float in powder (medium weigth - not fluffy) was very good but not outstanding. Comfortable in loose / medium spaced trees, good on soft bumps and excellent in chowder/crud. This spring I bought a pair of 183 Goats. I did not have a chance to ski them in powder but in spring snow they rocked = excellent float and stable through heavy mashed potatoes. Definately felt softer then the Mantras and when I did find some ice under the spring mush, the edge hold wasn't as good. I expect they would be not as quick in trees, but I agree with other posters, more versatile then the Mantras.

Another ski you should stongly consider (probably needs to be ordered in the US) is the Icelantic Shaman (160-110-130) I bought a pair of 173's and skied them in Western powder, TIGHT trees, soft bumps, chowder and soft/medium firm groomers. QUICK turning in trees, phenominal float in powder = effortless, good in soft bumps if not cut with steep faces and stable at speed on soft groomers. This is NOT an ice ski but for the condtions you described, would be an excellent choice. I would recommend 173 as the correct length.

Hope this is helpful - Falcon_O aka Charlie
post #34 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by lukc View Post
i would say that the enforcer is probably more demanding than the gotama; something very akin to the mantra.

but the blower, i hear, suffers from a lack of... how shall i put this? "OOMPH!" as in, it doesn't have the testicular fortitude for when the goings get not-so-good-going. all hear-say, though...
I was relying on the feed back of one of the best skiers (& trainer/ examiners) that I have met/ seen/ been taught by who surprised me by saying that he had got a pair of Blowers this season. He normally just does everything on his Jetfuel or Hot Rod (one is about 75mm underfoot and the other is 84mm underfoot - not sure which model is which).

He can bend a GS race ski like a noodle in the shortest of short turns and he said that the Blower did everything pretty well, great in powder, great in trees and not too bad in bumps or on the groomed. I looked at a pair seriously in Bozeman in Feb but the guy wanted too much for them so I passed.

Unless a ski is torsionally rubbish (like a Rossi B2 for example) then edge hold is more a matter of edge angle and leg strength in my opinion and experience. For example I run an 88 side/ 1 base on my DP Pros (well all my skis) and if they are not holding (early season) I know it is because I haven't done the leg work to maintain my skiing strength.
post #35 of 46
Would it be safe to say that the higher you go in altitude and the colder it is the lighter the powder would be? I think that is the case with PNW snow. We are usually at 5-7k above sea level, just below the melting point. But when an east wind blows and it gets colder, the powder works a lot better.

I have Mantras, bought them on sale end of season and am skiing a lot better than my B2s on everything. Maybe I buy Gotamas after reading this thread. Maybe not. Sometimes me yankee, sometimes me pay five dolla.

I've also been thinking lately that the 2 best feelings you can get when out skiing are untracked powder where you don't fall down and really good carving on groomed without any old ladies or children in the way. Just wondering, can Gotamas carve like Harold Harb teaches? The Mantras sure can. Just takes a little longer to get from one edge to the other. All said and done, I'm telling everyone that will listen that it's a new world and fat is in (at least for skis).
post #36 of 46
Thread Starter 
@falcon: I read about the Icelantic Ski, I agree, the Shaman would be the most interesting (they have also a very interesting topsheet). The European Partners of Icelantic are offering demos of their ski at the moment, at the Stubai glacier (the weather in middle-europe is far to warm for good testing - near to 30 C) and they plan to offer their products next season - maybe I should have a look at this.

So the testfield ist growing again. So many skis to test and not enough time to do.
post #37 of 46
My two (euro) cents: anything as wide as a Gotama (which I now proudly own) is not a realistic everyday ski in the Alps. I mean, not like you couldn't ski it every day, but if you're in the quiver business, it might be number three or four out of the bag in terms of days used. Just my view, let's not do a wide vs. wider vs. wider ski thing here, please, it's almost summer.
post #38 of 46
Thread Starter 
@prickly: Depends on where you ski. As I mentioned before, I choose the ski I take with me depending from the resort I visit.
In the last two years I was at Kitzsteinhorn, Stubai, Lech/Zuers, Hintertux (not all resorts I visisted) and there you could use a ski this fat (due to there were enough soft groomers, soft snow, deep snow and powder - at least when I was there).
But you're right, it wouldn't be my everyday ski.
post #39 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew R View Post
I was relying on the feed back of one of the best skiers (& trainer/ examiners) that I have met/ seen/ been taught by who surprised me by saying that he had got a pair of Blowers this season. He normally just does everything on his Jetfuel or Hot Rod (one is about 75mm underfoot and the other is 84mm underfoot - not sure which model is which).

He can bend a GS race ski like a noodle in the shortest of short turns and he said that the Blower did everything pretty well, great in powder, great in trees and not too bad in bumps or on the groomed. I looked at a pair seriously in Bozeman in Feb but the guy wanted too much for them so I passed.

Unless a ski is torsionally rubbish (like a Rossi B2 for example) then edge hold is more a matter of edge angle and leg strength in my opinion and experience. For example I run an 88 side/ 1 base on my DP Pros (well all my skis) and if they are not holding (early season) I know it is because I haven't done the leg work to maintain my skiing strength.
pow, trees, and soft bumps and groomers are all places that a conventional pow ski should do just fine. so that's not really what i meant by "when the goings get not-so-good." i'm talkin bout CRUD, my man. if you have a quiver of skis and you take your fat ski out on a day that is obviously too firm for it, then that's easily fixed. but the REAL problem on a day when the snow is soft is the trade-off beetween float and crud-bustin. THIS is where i hear the blower suffers
post #40 of 46
Gots can't rail like the Mantras on groomers...but they still do very well. Anything they sacrifice in groomer performance they make up for twofold in the POW. They are so floaty and quick turning in 3 dimensions..and so much fun. My buddies have the Mantra but can't hang in the POW...less float and a bit of tip dive at times..they like em but I wouldn't trade the Gots for the Mantras unless I was an EC skier. With much love to my EC brothers and sisters....I'm glad I only roll West Coast style....
post #41 of 46
Thread Starter 
Ah, one thing I forgot to ask. Which binding would you recommend for a wide ski (like the Gotama, Thug, Enforcer, Katana etc.)?
post #42 of 46
In your situation, I'd probably throw a Jester or Duke on depending on expected use (or at your weight, maybe next year's Baron or Griffin, maybe). After that I'd most likely use a Salomon STH 12 (or again at your weight, maybe even a Z12). But there is a bunch of personal preference that goes into this. Anything high quality from a major manufacturer - with a readily available wide brake or an easily bent brake - & you'll be good to go.
post #43 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedCap View Post
@prickly: Depends on where you ski. As I mentioned before, I choose the ski I take with me depending from the resort I visit.
In the last two years I was at Kitzsteinhorn, Stubai, Lech/Zuers, Hintertux (not all resorts I visisted) and there you could use a ski this fat (due to there were enough soft groomers, soft snow, deep snow and powder - at least when I was there).
But you're right, it wouldn't be my everyday ski.
Oh I agree. My Gotamas are "Canada Only" at the moment, but I expect to use them in the Alps before too long. When I travel in Europe (by car) I usually bring two pairs of skis anyway. There were a lot of days last season in Italy when they would have served me well, but I was just using up other skis from the quiver. I'll be interested to see how the Gotamas do in mixed use, particularly in bumps. From what I hear, no problem.
post #44 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by prickly View Post
anything as wide as a Gotama (which I now proudly own) is not a realistic everyday ski in the Alps.
Only because you live on the wrong side of the main alpine ridge....
post #45 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by lukc View Post
pow, trees, and soft bumps and groomers are all places that a conventional pow ski should do just fine. so that's not really what i meant by "when the goings get not-so-good." i'm talkin bout CRUD, my man. if you have a quiver of skis and you take your fat ski out on a day that is obviously too firm for it, then that's easily fixed. but the REAL problem on a day when the snow is soft is the trade-off beetween float and crud-bustin. THIS is where i hear the blower suffers
I could see how it could compared to the DP Pro or a stiffer ski like the Gotama. It is that dilemma though - a softer tip bends so that the ski floats (or doesn't dive) in powder, that same relative softness could contribute too less crud busting ability.

I have never had that problem having only owned Blizzard Titan Nine 188cm (awesome skis) and Stockli DP Pro 193cm (more awesome - they should make a 110mm under foot version). I have had a couple of demo skis on Gotamas and they were good, not as precise in difficult snow but better float in powder (more surface area/ softer tip). That said they prob had an 89 side edge and the shift to 88 side makes a huge grip difference on firmer snow and in icy conditions.

I guess you have to demo demo and demo some more (or borrow friends skis) until you find the ski that works best all round for what you want to do.
post #46 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by PowHog View Post
Only because you live on the wrong side of the main alpine ridge....
Only 'cause I don't live in Utah. And remember, I said everyday ski.

NB: We got over 8 meters of snow at my hill this season. Not exactly suffering (for Europe).
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