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First nite in Denver?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Hi all and happy summer!
I'm getting ready to get my flights for next season, (before the price gets stupid!), and had a question.
Is it worth coming out a day early and staying in Denver before going up to the high country to help with altitude adjustment?
I've been to Colorado many, many times and still suffer for the first two days. I take Acetazolamide and while it certainly helps, I still get hit. I'm 62 and it seems to get worse each year. Doesn't affect my wife much, (I guess if you're prone, you're prone). After day two, I'm pretty much OK. I'm not incapicated by any stretch, but I feel pretty fatigued until acclimated.
Anyway, I've heard that staying in Denver the day and night of arrival will help. Any truth?

Thanks all....enjoy your summer.
post #2 of 11
I've heard that helps.
My husband has Sarcoidosis. It has effected his lungs in a big way(last PFT his capacity was 68%) When we hit Copper on our first trip, he suffered, I mean SUFFERED.
The Doooooood at the health food story 'totally hooked us up with this radical stuff'
New Chapter Breathe!
He started taking it on that trip, which helped him recover fairly well.
For our second trip, he started taking the BREATHE a week ahead of time, and never suffered from altitude at all.

I'm encouraging him to go back to his pulmonary specialist to find out if this stuff has helped him for the long term. But, you men don't go to doctors, unless you've lost a limb, do you?


*This product is derived from mushrooms, so if you're allergic to mushrooms, its not for you.
post #3 of 11
It definitely helps.

I don't suffer from altitude sickness, but my wife does. When we've driven straight from the airport to the mountains, or when we've flown into Aspen, she's miserable for several days until she acclimates to the altitude. The last few times, we've stayed in Denver a day or two before driving up into the mountains, and it seems to do the trick - she hasn't had any problems with altitude anytime we do it, either in Denver itself or in the mountains.

Besides, Denver is a terrific city to visit, with lots to do.
post #4 of 11
http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=34470

Yes it helps & gives your body time to acclimatize. Spend 2 nites if you can. Since you are pre-planning take advantage & do yourself a favor. AMS really ruins what could be a great ski vacation. The extra night or 2 is your best insurance.
post #5 of 11
The conventional wisdom is that spending a night or two acclimating will help.

Another thing that helps is to sleep at a lower elevation. (as the mountaineers say "climb high, sleep low") Not really an option for Colorado, but SLC & Tahoe offer the option of sleeping several thousand feet lower than the base of the hill. Since your wife suffers from altitude issues you might want to consider those destinations in the future.
post #6 of 11
Also recommended:

1) No alcohol
2) Limited caffeine
3) hydrate, hydrate, hydrate
post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post
you men don't go to doctors, unless you've lost a limb, do you?
A missing limb pretty much signals a trip to the the Doctor for most men unless they have a buddy they trust with a tourniquet.
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by C.B. View Post
Hi all and happy summer!
I'm getting ready to get my flights for next season, (before the price gets stupid!), and had a question.
Is it worth coming out a day early and staying in Denver before going up to the high country to help with altitude adjustment?
I've been to Colorado many, many times and still suffer for the first two days. I take Acetazolamide and while it certainly helps, I still get hit. I'm 62 and it seems to get worse each year. Doesn't affect my wife much, (I guess if you're prone, you're prone). After day two, I'm pretty much OK. I'm not incapicated by any stretch, but I feel pretty fatigued until acclimated.
Anyway, I've heard that staying in Denver the day and night of arrival will help. Any truth?

Thanks all....enjoy your summer.
Yes, definitely!! I get migraines and shortness of breath when going from sea level (Used to live in NJ) to the ski areas of Colorado (especially remember Snowmass and Copper trips). Fortunately my brother lives in Denver, so after I made the connection (took me a while since sometimes I'd stay in Denver and sometimes we'd drive right up), I made sure to stay in Denver. I'm thinking that now I live at 3700 feet and regularly go up to 6800 feet here, it might not be such a problem. My brother used to give me all these instructions, don't drink alcohol, drink lots of water, yada yada, but the best thing was doing it in stages. It would still be like three days before just a downhill run didn't wind me, but at least the migraines were reduced and we weren't considering a hospital visit. (Just remembering the time I flew directly into Aspen. He drove up from Denver to see me. The migraine was so bad, I refused to come down to the front desk to see him and sent him home!!!)
post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post
But, you men don't go to doctors, unless you've lost a limb, do you?
Losing a pint a blood out of any place other than our nose is the more general case.
post #10 of 11
Absolutely, not that you need a reason to stay a night in Denver, it's a fantastic city. We've been doing this the last few trips, yes for the altitude adjustment, get over a whopping dose of jet lag, do some shopping, and check out a great bar or microbrewery in LoDo.
post #11 of 11
I would just skip CO all together, go to Utah or Tahoe instead.....nothing to see here.
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