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How many days on snow for you? - Page 3

Poll Results: How many days on snow did you get this year

 
  • 1% (2)
    ≤5
  • 5% (9)
    6-10
  • 6% (11)
    11-15
  • 6% (11)
    16-20
  • 5% (10)
    21-25
  • 9% (16)
    26-30
  • 8% (14)
    31-35
  • 5% (9)
    36-40
  • 2% (5)
    41-45
  • 6% (11)
    46-50
  • 13% (22)
    51-60
  • 7% (13)
    61-70
  • 4% (8)
    71-80
  • 2% (5)
    81-90
  • 3% (6)
    91-100
  • 8% (14)
    101-150
  • 1% (2)
    >150
168 Total Votes  
post #61 of 88
I'm up to 125, and Thursday-Friday (my days off) are looking like they will see some pretty good conditions (as long as it freezes overnight, I'm happy), a cold front is due to move in on Tuesday and remain until the weekend.
post #62 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by volantaddict View Post
I'm up to 125, and Thursday-Friday (my days off) are looking like they will see some pretty good conditions (as long as it freezes overnight, I'm happy), a cold front is due to move in on Tuesday and remain until the weekend.
we havent froze overnight for a couple days now.

but

this cold front could mean more snow for the holiday weekend.
post #63 of 88
Spindrift it's okay to be skeptical. Knowing how retiree's tend to find out they have far less time to be retired & do those things they want, I can see why you would be skeptical. Those still working tend to have serious drive to make the best use of those lovely modified work schedules, telecommuting, time off banked time, then add in the weekends & holidays. If they are really good at it, Winter time is more time off & skiing then it is working time.

Now being a full-time mom, I figured I'd get in more days. But, all those parent committments, school vol, days or weeks of sick kid, kids sports or outings, & general home duties cut into it. Sometimes I was just too tired to go ski. My season starts around Christmas & ends April or May. I had to be home for the school bus departure/arrival so days were only 9:00-3:00. I rarely ski on Saturdays. I didn't bust a gut & passed on many ski days. I still managed 60 days. I don't count 'em, my pass account does. I just count the out of state trips, gatherings, & occasional lessons & add them in. I don't care how many hours on snow count or not. I just care that I skied, had fun, got better, didn't sustain injury & met lots of great people. The only meaning behind 60 days is I put in mileage to get alot better than I was in December.
post #64 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
we havent froze overnight for a couple days now.

but

this cold front could mean more snow for the holiday weekend.

Yeah, it's been too warm here since Friday, we're due to get a little snow, but I'll settle for a base that doesn't punch through.
post #65 of 88
29 and then I suffered a detached retina. Happened at work, not while skiing. Let that be a lesson: ski, don't work. Work's too damn dangerous .
post #66 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by volantaddict View Post
Yeah, it's been too warm here since Friday, we're due to get a little snow, but I'll settle for a base that doesn't punch through.
yeah that why I stopped hiking for turns the past couple days as well, punch breakable base, isnt easy to skin/hike on, isnt safe, and isnt fun. So other hobbies are back into the picture.
post #67 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
Spindrift's argument gets a lot more potent if you fill in the blanks:

1) Let's say you work full time at a non-industry job, and do not live near the slopes,

2) And let's say you're married, and

3) Let's say that you wish to stay married.

Under those premises, the concept of skiing every weekend and every holiday, plus several weeks of vacation, does not, as Mr. Spock would say, compute. There are life activities like: repairing the door, hanging out with the visiting in-laws, taking a winter vacation where most wives love, and secretly you may even enjoy a bit too (a warm place near an ocean), and Saturday shopping for new whatsits at Cosco. There are also those irksome decisions about whether to pay for a solo lift ticket or pizza and a movie with your woman. Guesses which one will make you happier that night?

4) Now let's factor in kids

This increases the number of life activities exponentially per child. Ever helped out with a day care yard sale on a nice spring Saturday? Or had to drop what you're doing/planning to do because your child has a fever and your wife already has work-related commitments? Take all this into account (which is termed, "reality), and it is HIGHLY unlikely you can get in more than 40-50 days a year.

Now if you are fulltime non-I and far from the slopes, but otherwise single and planning to remain that way, or a student (alternative reality), or if you have a wife who enjoys your OCD so you'll get out of her hair/she can rationalize her OCD, or if you prefer to have your kids raised by a nanny/roam the streets/set fire to the house while you perfect your powder moves, you may be able to pull off 80-100 days. Otherwise, NOT!

(And what's more shocking still, those of us who have families are not really pulling out our hair over not getting in 100 days. : I'd have liked to go the moon, too, but not worrying about the NASA quota.)

Bushwackerin also makes a very relevant point; sure, it counts as a day to cruise 10 runs down a perfectly groomed blue for 2 hrs, but where you get better - and find out about yourself - is 2 hrs pushing hard, whether it's with an instructor, down a chute, in a storm, or around a gate. Those of us who can't pull off 50+ days can still make the days we do ski really count...

The real difference is there are some people for whom skiing is a passion and some for whom it is an activity.

Both have "reality" to deal with.
The former manage to fit it in their non skiing days.
post #68 of 88
Just squeaked out 100 days, and had my first VIP ride in an ambulance. Although, I was disappointed when they denied my approval on using the sirens. Apparently a broken neck wasn't important enough......Bummer.

summer is here but lest not forget....Water Skiing!

Cheers,
huck
post #69 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilT View Post

Both have "reality" to deal with.
The former manage to fit it in their non skiing days.
For me the non skiing days don't hit until the off season, I'm finally getting around to cleaning up my hovel a bit.
post #70 of 88
I might very well have earned the most MILES in my ~60 skiing days this year so far. I live 200 miles from the resort, but went up nearly every weekend. The other reason I'm able to get the days in is that I get every other Friday off work (and skied every one of those days). I did the ski lease thing which I highly recommend. 2 weeks at Christmas and most of the week at President's plus a few random vacation days from the day job, and you can ski quite a bit. I did keep a ski diary, but the tally is on my white board at work.

My day job was very understanding, even encouraging... so I guess I'll keep it.

Might go for two more days this weekend to close Mammoth and ensure skiing in June.

-Adam
post #71 of 88
Quote:
That's why the only thing that really says how much you are skiing is vertical.
I'm in general agreement with this statement. I know, it doesn't give enough credit to the BC skiers, and vertical in challenging off-piste isn't the same as yoyoing groomers. But it's like the Churchill comment about democracy: vertical is the worst single measure of how much you've skied, except for all the others. Definitely better than number of days IMHO.

36 days, 617K vertical for me this season, 145K of powder. I actually like vertical + powder vertical as best measure of quality of a ski season.

beyond's comments are welcome dose of reality. While married with young kids I rarely got as many as 30. Season totals for prior seasons here: http://webpages.charter.net/tcrocker818/vft_seas.htm
post #72 of 88
how the hell do you guys know how many vertical feet you've skied.
post #73 of 88
103 and done.
I have a very important question--If I go to SA this summer do the ski days count towards this season or next?
post #74 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunValley View Post
103 and done.
I have a very important question--If I go to SA this summer do the ski days count towards this season or next?
I'd say this one.
post #75 of 88
Quote:
how the hell do you guys know how many vertical feet you've skied.
Since 1995 from the Vertech and/or Suunto altimeter watches. Before that, by counting the vertical of the lifts I rode. I admit to OCD for doing that for 17 years:

I always count Southern Hemisphere as end of the previous northern season.
post #76 of 88
Fine, but as was pointed out in another thread, these altimeter watches track total vertical change, so for skiing you do need to divide the final reading by two. Also, the temperature compensation on these watches doesn't work at all, and accuracy of these altimeters is exceedingly poor, plus or minus several thousand feet even after "calibration". When I climbed the Eiger North Face my altimeter watch indicated we must be well above the summit while we were still climbing the Exit Cracks.
post #77 of 88
Those watches track altitude based on atmospheric pressure, so you must have been in low pressure = false high altitude. The temperature compensation is goofy, since the watches read your arm temp rather than outside air usually. My Casio Pathfinder can be several hundred feet off, but never several thousand feet.

Unless you count when I'm in a pressurized cabin of a airliner. 36,000 ft always reads out at 6,000.
post #78 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunValley View Post
103 and done.
I have a very important question--If I go to SA this summer do the ski days count towards this season or next?
I think this is like fiscal years. Pick a rollover date & stick with it.

I think I'm gonna count everything before the summer solstice as "this season" and everything after it as next. But I have a few weeks to decide
post #79 of 88
I did 97 and @ 80 miles a round trip, that works out to 7760 miles. Divide that by 20 mpg at the current price of gas!

RW
post #80 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron White View Post
I did 97 and @ 80 miles a round trip, that works out to 7760 miles. Divide that by 20 mpg at the current price of gas!

RW
80 miles round trip is NOTHING! Mine favorate hill? 80 miles ONE WAY!

Anyway, finally admit the season is over by putting the skis back into the corner BEHIND the bike and kayak stuff. I won't be touching them till December.

41 days downhill, 1 tele, 8 x-c. Altogether 50 days of skiing. The most EVER for me!
post #81 of 88
OK, today was the last for me, my final day at WB until last year. Today was not exactly epic (fog, rain, cloud), but yesterday was one of my top 3 ever spring days, with cloudless skies and 70+ at the top of 7th Heaven, and off-piste corn snow that rocked.

Accomplished two firsts for me - first time I skied in June, and first time I've skied my age (I'm almost old). Everything packed back up ready for November.
post #82 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by at_nyc View Post
80 miles round trip is NOTHING! Mine favorate hill? 80 miles ONE WAY!
My favorite hill: 151 miles one way. I win (not)

Final tally for me: 34 days, 15 different mountains. I think I had ~25 days lifetime before this year. Thanks Epic!
post #83 of 88
The hill I worked at was 200 miles one way. 60 days, but ~2 or 3 days per trip since I did the local lodging thing. 20+ trips * 400 miles = 8000+ miles.

I definitely didn't make enough teaching skiing to pay for the carbon offsets. Heh. I believe that my ski job paid for the gas. The free pass paid for the lodging. I got to ski a lot. I learned a lot. I had a lot of fun.

-Adam
post #84 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift View Post
I think this is like fiscal years. Pick a rollover date & stick with it.

I think I'm gonna count everything before the summer solstice as "this season" and everything after it as next. But I have a few weeks to decide

I tend to use October as the cut-off and begin date for the ski season.

Why?

I believe Mt. Hood usually closes down at the end of September for maintanance and then re-opens in October.

October, on a good year, is usually when A-Basin and/or Loveland open.

October is usually when the major chains like REI begin stocking their stores with winter gear.

I also think October is when S.A. (and Australia and New Zealand) season "technically" ends.
post #85 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by raspritz View Post
Fine, but as was pointed out in another thread, these altimeter watches track total vertical change, so for skiing you do need to divide the final reading by two. Also, the temperature compensation on these watches doesn't work at all, and accuracy of these altimeters is exceedingly poor, plus or minus several thousand feet even after "calibration". When I climbed the Eiger North Face my altimeter watch indicated we must be well above the summit while we were still climbing the Exit Cracks.
Untrue. It depends on the watch. My Vertech would either track UP or DOWN. I've had three of them. Only the first was fairly reliable. I now have a Brunton and it does an UP and also a DOWN. It doesn't add them up. I "calibrate" the accuracy by doing 8 days at the beginning of the season and comparing the length of my chair ascents (info available from the resort) with the UP and also with the DOWN, then I look at the cumulative accuracy for the known ascents (and this should equal the descents except for hoopdedo trails with lots of rollers). I decide if UP is more accurate or DOWN is more accurate and note the difference in %. If it's within 5%, it's tolerable. Last year, over 8 days, DOWN was within 3%. I therefore did NOT adjust the vertical it showed because it said Down was 3% higher than the lift-provided stats I'd kept. I felt that the 3% would cover the roller type hills. On any given day, the difference might be higher or lower by more than that, but over 8 days, it all netted out to just a 3% difference, so that's fine by me for a season. Also, I didn't worry too much about the actual elevation shown as although you can adjust it every day to fix barometric change impacts, on any given day without wild fluctuations in barometric pressure all you care about is the vertical change. After all, starting on a mountain with a summit of 7000 and skiing down to a base at 4000 is no different than starting at 6000 and skiing down to 3000. The different top to bottom is still 3000 feet. So, it matters little for THIS statistic (vertical) that you're not entirely accurate when you start your ski day. If I was climbing a mountain or flying a plane I'd care about the actual elevation, but I don't for skiing.
post #86 of 88
sibhusky has it right. Only vertical change matters. I do the occasional audit counting chairs and it's usually well within 3%.

FYI I got to ski the extra weekend Mammoth was open, so revised season totals are 38 days and 664K vertical.
post #87 of 88
After this weekend my total will be 72. 3 of which were at Brundage/Tamarak up in Idaho and 69 at snowbird. Almost all at snowbird were powder days up until mid/late April, after that most have been on incredible slushy spring snow, which IMHO is almost just as good as powder. Back in the day ( when I was in college ) I skied more days, but this year was amazing. One of the best ever, or at least in a really long time.
post #88 of 88
73 ...was a good year. A few less than the prior year.
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