New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Let the Snow scrape 'em!

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Location: Snoqualmie Pass, WA
Condition: Wet Spring Snow (32+ F)
Terrain: Mostly on-Piste and Terrain Park

I've been lazy enough to plop a thick layer of warm (26-32F) wax onto my base then letting a couple of runs scrape it off for me, so far so good...

Focus: Have you ever tried this? Any noticeable consequence?
post #2 of 15
I hotwax and the last pass I use a paper towel which absorbs mosts of the excess wax and leaves a fairly smooth finish. Then I ski them. Works great.
post #3 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tetranode View Post
Location: Snoqualmie Pass, WA
Condition: Wet Spring Snow (32+ F)
Terrain: Mostly on-Piste and Terrain Park

I've been lazy enough to plop a thick layer of warm (26-32F) wax onto my base then letting a couple of runs scrape it off for me, so far so good...

Focus: Have you ever tried this? Any noticeable consequence?
The official issue is that it causes the ski to pick up dirt. That being said most tuning is irrelevant other than to knock off a few hundredths in the race course. That being a timed run that actually matters in some way. Most top skiers tune very little if at all. I train with kids in the 80 pt range FIS and when I ask them what kind of wax they use they say "anything I can get". Yet these are kids that actually do the things on skis that erudite professionals spend hours debating on these forums. I would say precise ski tuning is the province of skiers on national teams who have paid ski techs doing it for them or anal old men with $$ and delusions. So go ahead ski it off, don't worry about it.

- Fossil
post #4 of 15
I do it that way all the time but after waxing usually hit it hard with a horse hair brush...I notice little if any difference vs scraping
post #5 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flying Fossil View Post
The official issue is that it causes the ski to pick up dirt. That being said most tuning is irrelevant other than to knock off a few hundredths in the race course. That being a timed run that actually matters in some way. Most top skiers tune very little if at all. I train with kids in the 80 pt range FIS and when I ask them what kind of wax they use they say "anything I can get". Yet these are kids that actually do the things on skis that erudite professionals spend hours debating on these forums. I would say precise ski tuning is the province of skiers on national teams who have paid ski techs doing it for them or anal old men with $$ and delusions. So go ahead ski it off, don't worry about it.

- Fossil
Ski tuning is not waxing. Ski tuning is setting the geometry of your base/base edge and side edge and keeping them sharp.

waxing is self explanatory.

For spring wet snow this time of year it is imperative to get as much of the wax as possible into the base not on it. You must have as much structure exposed as possible to minimize the suction created by the additional water layer in spring snow.

You can't tell me you enjoy the start and stop erractic behavior of your skis on wet spring snow.

I 1st rotobrush with a brass roto, then brush out with a brass combo brush. I then crayon a mixture of Demoninator slush and Demnator Basix 99 yellow. I then iron in extremely well and the last pass I use fiberlene between the iron and base.

After sitting overnight, I first scrape, then rotobrush wiht a stiff horsehair roto, scrape some more and roto again and then polish with a short soft nylon black brush.

I skied Sunday at Alpental, it may have reached 55-60 degrees. I started on my Head i.sl Rd's for the groomed morning and as the snow softened and became bumpier I switched to my Monster 88 (both pair prepared as above)All I can tell you is i had none of the sticky start/stop eractic behavior of a overwaxed or non-waxed ski even into the afternoon as the snow deteriorated
post #6 of 15
Yeah, good point about the prep for spring slush. That's a different beast.
post #7 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
Ski tuning is not waxing. Ski tuning is setting the geometry of your base/base edge and side edge and keeping them sharp.

waxing is self explanatory.

For spring wet snow this time of year it is imperative to get as much of the wax as possible into the base not on it. You must have as much structure exposed as possible to minimize the suction created by the additional water layer in spring snow.

You can't tell me you enjoy the start and stop erractic behavior of your skis on wet spring snow.

I 1st rotobrush with a brass roto, then brush out with a brass combo brush. I then crayon a mixture of Demoninator slush and Demnator Basix 99 yellow. I then iron in extremely well and the last pass I use fiberlene between the iron and base.

After sitting overnight, I first scrape, then rotobrush wiht a stiff horsehair roto, scrape some more and roto again and then polish with a short soft nylon black brush.

I skied Sunday at Alpental, it may have reached 55-60 degrees. I started on my Head i.sl Rd's for the groomed morning and as the snow softened and became bumpier I switched to my Monster 88 (both pair prepared as above)All I can tell you is i had none of the sticky start/stop eractic behavior of a overwaxed or non-waxed ski even into the afternoon as the snow deteriorated
Demoninator slush and Demnator Basix? Haven't hear of these, where do I get them.
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max_501 View Post
I hotwax and the last pass I use a paper towel which absorbs mosts of the excess wax and leaves a fairly smooth finish. Then I ski them. Works great.
Ditto.

A little brushing and polishing for wet snow.
post #9 of 15
I used to wax and not scrape, saying I couldn't feel the difference after 100 feet or so. I now "do" my skis (deburr and polish edges, wax, scrape, brush) every other ski day. I can especially feel the difference of the nice clean edges! I also can feel the greater ease of turning when I have newly waxed skis. But I admit, it was only after getting USED to the improved ski and then getting lazy (like four days on the ski) that I could sense the difference.

So, for most folks, never waxing might even be okay. So, waxing and not scraping or brushing will at least help preserve the bases, better than nothing.

Until it's spring. This season, unbelievable as it was, did have a few days at the end of February with spring-ish conditions. Due to my disciplined scraping and brushing, I never once had that sudden skiing-across-rubber feeling in the afternoon. Yeah, occasionally I could tell that I didn't have full slickery-ness, but nothing that sent me even close to over the tips of the skis. I'd planned to have a spring structure put into my older groomer skis come March 1, but we had winter from then until we closed. I'll get that done in the fall once I've got my new winter conditions groomer skis ready to go. In the spring, a clean structure is crucial to survival.
post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by spielerman View Post
Demoninator slush and Demnator Basix? Haven't hear of these, where do I get them.
www.dominatorwax.com

You want to go to the 4X4 system and get either FX 33 Yellow High flouro (really expensive)

or Hx99 Hydrocarbon Yellow (much cheaper.)

they don't have Slush listed so yu may have to email them about that.
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
For spring wet snow this time of year it is imperative to get as much of the wax as possible into the base not on it. You must have as much structure exposed as possible to minimize the suction created by the additional water layer in spring snow.

You can't tell me you enjoy the start and stop erractic behavior of your skis on wet spring snow.

I 1st rotobrush with a brass roto, then brush out with a brass combo brush. I then crayon a mixture of Demoninator slush and Demnator Basix 99 yellow. .
I seldom wade into a disagreement with Atomicman, because even though he has switched to Head's, he knows what he's talking about.

I skied today, wet spring snow with unscraped Swix LF-10. My skis were fast as could be from the very first run. Here's the factory structure at the shovel, where wax tends to linger, on a new pair of Dynamic VR17's after just a few runs. I don't think scraping and brushing would have acomplished much more than messing up the basement.





Now, sub zero powder is another story...
post #12 of 15
Hey, if it worked for ya that's excellent!

You have a lot of very new structure with a minimum of wax it looks like whihc is great for these conditions.

But how warm did it get? It is usually the worst in the afternnoon when there is even more water in the snow and on the flatter sections of the hill.
post #13 of 15
It was maybe 45 when I left but the snow was well transformed, so it cleaned out the structure very well.

Warm, wet untransformed snow, such as the first warm day after some new snow would probably make all that work brushing open the structure worthwhile. I've got my rotobrushes armed and ready, so I guess I don't really disgree that much.
post #14 of 15
It was about 60 Degrees at Alpental on Sunday! I had no problem with my concoction and brush out! Don't really know if the other Bears there had an issue. I think Spindrift mentioned a bit of stickiness!
post #15 of 15
Ive done it and will never do it again....it was like having glue on the bottom of my skis.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs