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Queries about working as a ski instructor in Italy. Please HELP!!!

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
Ok basically I am an Irish citizen and I plan to gain my CSIA Level 1 & 2 qualifications to become a ski instructor this winter(on one of those all-inclusive 10/11 week instructor course jobies).
After this my dream would be to base myself in The Italian Alps(ideally Livigno in the Lombardy region) and work as a full-time instructor during the winter seasons. HOWEVER...upon looking into this I have come across some information suggesting that there may be certain legislation in place restricting ski instructors who are not native italian/or have not gained AMSI qualifications(the italian ski instructors body) from working freely in the Italian Alps. For example, I came across this quote on a website - `The Aosta Valley restricts most 'foreign' instructors to seven days teaching per season. However, if you sit and pass the AVMS Test, you will earn a derogation entitling you to teach up to 28 days per season for as long as your licence remains valid`.
So basically my question is, does anyone know if there is such legislation in place restricting non-Italian citizens from working as ski instructors in the Alps?? Does it relate to the whole of Italy or is it exclusive to The Aosta Valley. As an Irish citizen, with canadian ski instructor qualifications will I be able to work as a ski instructor all-season year-in year-out in Italy or is there legislation in place to prevent this???
Is there anyone who can help me answer this question? Anyone who is a ski instructor and has worked in Italy?
Please help as I haved trawled through various search engines and I cannot find the answer to my question anywhere.

Thanks a mil!!
post #2 of 25
Normally if you get an ISIA stamp there shouldn't be a problem.
I don't know what you need to do in Canada to be able to become a member of the ISIA.
As far as regulations in Italy are concerned, I think a lot is regionally settled more than nationally but I can't really say for sure...
post #3 of 25
Thread Starter 

Queries about working as a Ski Instructor in Italy. Please HELP!!!

Ok basically I am an Irish citizen and I plan to gain my CSIA Level 1 & 2 qualifications to become a ski instructor this winter(on one of those all-inclusive 10/11 week instructor course jobies).
After this my dream would be to base myself in The Italian Alps(ideally Livigno in the Lombardy region) and work as a full-time instructor during the winter seasons. HOWEVER...upon looking into this I have come across some information suggesting that there may be certain legislation in place restricting ski instructors who are not native italian/or have not gained AMSI qualifications(the italian ski instructors body) from working freely in the Italian Alps. For example, I came across this quote on a website - `The Aosta Valley restricts most 'foreign' instructors to seven days teaching per season. However, if you sit and pass the AVMS Test, you will earn a derogation entitling you to teach up to 28 days per season for as long as your licence remains valid`.
So basically my question is, does anyone know if there is such legislation in place restricting non-Italian citizens from working as ski instructors in the Alps?? Does it relate to the whole of Italy or is it exclusive to The Aosta Valley. As an Irish citizen, with canadian ski instructor qualifications will I be able to work as a ski instructor all-season year-in year-out in Italy or is there legislation in place to prevent this???
Is there anyone who can help me answer this question? Anyone who is a ski instructor and has worked in Italy?
Please help as I haved trawled through various search engines and I cannot find the answer to my question anywhere.

Thanks a mil!!
post #4 of 25
Thread Starter 
Yeah the CSIA are a member of ISIA and are generally recognised all over the world (similar to how PSIA,BASI etc would be) however its not this end which is causing the problem. The problem which is confusing me is the legislation that seems to be in place in Italy (which just so happens to be the country I want to settle and instruct in) which seemingly restricts `foreign` ski instructors from working freely in the Italian Alps(even though I thought being an EU citizen this would not be a problem?).
The credibility of the CSIA qualifications is not what puzzled me. It was when I went about researching ski jobs in Italy that I came across various mentions of the above legislation. However I have only seen fragmented information on it, and only in referral to The Aosta Valley so I do not know if it is exclusive to this area or if it is a law all over Italy? Also I am finding it hard to find out any official government information on such legislation if one does exist as all websites with relating information would be in Italian...a language I dont speak (yet!).
post #5 of 25
Well, European law does come into play here.
If you are qualified for the job (ISIA-certified) then I don't think they can keep you out unless the knowledge of Italian is also a requirement.
I think what you've heard/found on the net relates mostly to non- or less-qualified Europeans teaching crap all over the place.

Learn the language and contact the skischool of your choice, I'm sure they will know exactly what's going on.
post #6 of 25
Thread Starter 
Cheers Schussboelie! I'm embarrassed to admit I didn't even think of getting onto ski schools in Italy/Livigno and asking them about it. Good call.
All I have to do now is carry on trying to master the langauge...which at present is in the preliminary stages to say the least!

Suggestions still welcome...
post #7 of 25
Polarbear, I'm going to move your post to the Eurozone where it probably has a better chance of getting a reply.

Looking forward to hearing more on the Irish invasion.
post #8 of 25
Thread Starter 
Its in there already, I posted it here too just incase anyone outside Europe knew the answer (although unlikely)! What can I say I'm getting shocking desperate at this stage

Irish invasion indeed...I'm brand new to this blog scene but I presume Irish wannabe ski instructors are few and far between (or there is feck-all of us as we say back home!!!!)
I'll be over on your shores next winter hopefully...watch out!
post #9 of 25
Just found out on a local forum that in Aosta apparently you need to pass the Eurotest (tough GS race), not so in Trentino and Alto Adige...
post #10 of 25
Bring Bushmills! :
post #11 of 25
Thread Starter 
Yeah its called an AVMS test (not quite as difficult as the french version but still very hard) and I also came across this on the same website I extracted the qoute from my origional thread regarding the Aosta Valley. Its encouraging news that it does not apply to Trentino-Alto Adige (which is in close proximity to livigno sharing the same middle-eastern area of the Italian Alps as appossed to Aosta which is way over to the west), as its leaning more towards the possibility that these strange legislation for The Aosta Valley are exclusive only to The Aosta Valley!
Thanks again for the info schussboelie!
post #12 of 25
Thread Starter 
Ha sure we drink that for breakfast over here...I'll make sure to bring ya some strong stuff!!
post #13 of 25
BASI has some information on obtaining an International Ski Teacher Diploma. This sounds like the type of thing you'll need:

http://www.basi.org.uk/qual_info.aspx?qid=12
post #14 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Polarbear2020 View Post
Yeah the CSIA are a member of ISIA and are generally recognised all over the world (similar to how PSIA,BASI etc would be) however its not this end which is causing the problem.
Just FYI....you need CSIA 3 minimum for ISIA....technically you will also need a few other things like CAA 1.
post #15 of 25
Polarbear: I am UK based (well for 5 weeks of the year) and I have been working my way through my CSIA quals as I want to work in Canada.

CSIA Level 3 is the ISIA equiv - you would need to be a pretty good (read excellent) skier to pass the skiing - you will also need a fair amount of non skiing teaching experience (or lots of skiing teaching experience) to pass the teaching.

As someone else suggested to qualify in the CSIA system you would also need to be doing your entry level CSCF (coaching) and I think you will need you Avalanche 1 but maybe not until Level 4 (ski gurus).

The Europeans are a funny lot - I worked with some Italians last season (in NZ) and they were great but regulations are very region by region (like a lot of Europe really). Their systems are in place to basically give preferential treatment to locals (ie ex racers that got cut at EuroCup level) and whilst they recognise ISIA - they have a mentality difference between European ISIA and non European ISIA.

If you are really set on teaching in Europe you really are better off doing the BASI courses and they way you meet a network of BASI instructors/ trainers and examiners who are already set up in Europe.

If you are interested and have some time spare this summer there are BASI courses run outside Europe that I can tell you about PM me and I will send you the details.
post #16 of 25
You can work with CSIA 2, if you have taken the Italian ski and language test, but only for a couple of weeks a season. Best bet is to contact Interski for more info. To work all season, you'll need CSIA 3 ISIA again with the Italian test. Probably better to go the BASI route if working in Italy though.
post #17 of 25
Thread Starter 
Thanks everyone!!
Essentially the reason I posted this thread was because although I love skiing, at the moment thats all I am...a skier and I have absolutely no inside knowledge of the ski industry. So I didnt want to start off into the career and then maybe regret taking the wrong path (or qualifications etc)for what I wanted to do. Anyway I have a loooooong way to go more than likely before I can shack up in Italy for my winters but I have a much better idea about how to get there now!!!
Thanks everyone for the help and do keep it coming if you wish to add anything else, all advice welcome
post #18 of 25
You could probably start off with a first accreditation from BASI or CSIA and do one or more seasons in Austria.
After that, when you get your ISIA and Italian skills you can move to Italy.
Austria tends to be less strict, you need to drink some beers with the skischool director and then you can get started (usually as a "trainee" though, kinda like France).
post #19 of 25
Switzerland is a good option too, as you can work there without ISIA
post #20 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyderman View Post
Switzerland is a good option too, as you can work there without ISIA

What's the possibility of working in Hemel without ISIA?
(also, how long do BASI normally take to reply to emails???)
post #21 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wear The Fox Hat View Post
What's the possibility of working in Hemel without ISIA?
(also, how long do BASI normally take to reply to emails???)
I'm sure there's an IT job in Hemel you could find.
Do BASI ever reply to emails?:
post #22 of 25
I think you just need BASI 1 to teach in a non-mountain environment. This is quite easy to obtain. Check out the BASI website - when it's back up again! I think their mailserver is AWOL too.
post #23 of 25
altis, sorry, a bit of a joke - Spyderman teaches at Hemel.
post #24 of 25
Polarbear2020 I got your PM and have replied...but the idea to contact Livigno's ski school is the simplest "entry point" to your quest.
post #25 of 25
This page from interski is a reasonable intro to working in the Aosta region as a foreign instructor.
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