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A quiver for the first time - comments pls.

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
I have just spent this skiing in Whistler, about 85 full days , which when you've been used to skiing 6 to 12 days a season max like I have has been absolutely fantastic, especially with the snow they have had this year.

Anyway I bought some Public Enemys for the season as have never bought skis before and wanted something that could do a bit of everything including park.

Now I am looking to add and start to build up a quiver and am just looking for some advice.

I am 34, about 6 ft tall, (1.82 m), about 85 kilos. Skiing level is 9. Will probably ski 25 to 35 days a year spread between Europe, North and South America

My thoughts are to keep the PE's for park.

Add -

- a set of GS type skis for icier days or where I know I will be sticking mainly on groomers (I ski in Europe regularly which can be really icy and lots of groomers). Something like the Fischer Progressor 9's (70 underfoot) which come highly recommended by two friends and a Whistler Instructor as great high speed piste skis but manageable as all-mountain. Not sure whether to go for the 170 or 175, seen the reviews here but still can't make my mind up.

- A set of Volkl Mantras as my everyday ski (95 underfoot) , never really seen a bad word about them, again people I know rave about them and understand that they are a great all rounder (apart from the park aspect much more all-mountain performance than the PE's and much better in the powder) I have a £250 credit note from my local ski shop (in the UK) which I need to use up by end of this year so will buy these without testing, probably in the 183.

- have thought about a set of gotamas or similar but can't justify these yet as a little specialist for everyday use. If snow is epic somewhere may demo.

Any views on whether this seems a sensible direction or would anyone recommend I rethink ?

Thanks
post #2 of 18
You might want to check out SierraJim's end of season finale for the Dynastar Mythic Riders or the Salomon X-Wing Fury. More of a traditional all mountain ski 50/50. Definitely more of a GS type feel. Anyway, its a great time to fill in a quiver with a great deal.
post #3 of 18

Don't discount the Gotama

I just bought the Gotamas this past season to make my first 2 ski quiver . Don't discount this ski as your everyday ski. Its not a hardpack ski, but is still very capable on "mixed" days, and great on powder days (But also, not a huge 130 mm beast). I really like the ski a lot.
post #4 of 18
I say your PE's become your midfats, GS for groomers, and then go FAT with the last pair for the really deep days. Maybe I'm trying to live vicariously through your quiver though.
post #5 of 18
If you have PEs and are getting gs skis, there is no need for the mantras instead of the gotamas. Plenty of people use gots as everyday skis, maybe not in Europe, but definitely in n America.

What I would do is keep the PE's, and instead of gs skis I would get something around 80-90mm, but with a stiff gs like construction, maybe head 82s 88s or something similar. These will handle ice well but will be a lot more versatile than full on race skis.

Then I would get something a bit more powder specific. Personally, I like something around 120mm for pow specific skis, but the gotamas would probably be a great choice for you being in europe and all.


Skis like the monster 82s and 88s won't be quite as good on ice as race skis, but will be a lot better in mixed conditions. Most years, there are maybe three or four days (out of the 100 i ski) that I wish I had something narrower than my squads or ants (104/106). Buying skis for the three worst days of the season seems crazy to me if you aren't going to buy powder skis for the best days of the season.

But I live in N America and don't really care about park or groomers most of the time. The only groomers I really enjoy are steep enough that I can go mach plaid, and at that speed the squads feel plenty quick edge to edge.
post #6 of 18
i'm going to throw a wrench in the mix.

after going through 2 quivers over the past 3 seasons (each quiver consisting of 5 skis) i have come to the conclusion that one really only needs 2 pairs of skis.

1. an every day ski
in my case this season it was the 188 Lib Tech NAS Freeride

2. a powder ski
in my case this season it was 185 Volant Spatulas.

The other 3 skis in my quiver rarely, if ever, got used. In fact, I believe I will retire one pair, sell off the other, and the remaining one will rotate as my every day ski with the Lib Techs (or, since the Libs are mounted for BC, I may switch the binders and make the remaining ski, the AK King Salmon, my BC ski and the Libby's the every day).

But I digress...the truth of the matter is that after spending 3 seasons putting together a quiver to do it all, i learned that keeping things simple is best.

in the past when i was spending all my time deciding which skis to take on trips (often packing all 5 pairs), i was never really getting to know any of the skis personally.

this season i kept taking all my skis with me on trips and ended up only skiing the Libbys and Spats.

several of my core (as in the folks i ride with the most) only rock 2 pairs of skis, as well--1 every day pair that's usually in the upper 80s to 90s underfoot, 1 pair of powder planks in the 125+ range.

really, i think that's all you need (at least if you ride in Cali and Colo).

but then that's just me and what i've learned after 3 years of trying to find the perfect quiver. it just seems that simpler is better (of course i'm looking to purchase another pair of Libby's, but just as a back-up pair to the ones i currently have).

i say get 2 skis...one good everyday ripper and one serious powder set and you'll be good to go.
post #7 of 18
I'd get a pair of SL's instead of the GS and a pair of fat powder ski's like an Icelantic Shaman or something.
post #8 of 18
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the comments thus far. Lots to think about.

Thoughts based on the comments are that maybe 4 skis are rather too much to lug around and that as Dookey said would I actually use them...

So maybe thinking a set of Gotamas which are also twin tipped so can double as park skis (I am not into big tricks, just a bit of switch skiing, the odd 180 or 360). Has anyone used these as park skis and how do these stack up against the PE. Are they a lot heavier ? Also what are Gotamas like in chutes, trees etc when you need to get edge to edge quickly. Also over bumps ?

Then ditch the PE's which I really didn't like on ice, groomers (apart from when in perfect condition) or chopped up stuff, and get a pair of midfat carvers like the im 82,s.

Then if and only if I am not keen on them on icy stuff look at a pair of GS skis...
post #9 of 18
How do you like the PE's? I'm looking into picking up a used pair to play around on next season.

I'll second checking out Sierra Jim's site. I just picked up a pair of Nordica Hot Rod Nitrous skis from Jim. A fantastic ski! I'm really happy with it.
post #10 of 18
for the MOST part, i'd agree with dookey on the 2 ski quiver. BUT, as a former park skiier (had to lay down the park skis due to too many injuries and starting grad school... i'm buying non-twin-tips for the first time in 7 years), i think that a 3 ski quiver is probably the way to go for you. if you really do a significant amount of park, you really should just have one pair of dedicated park skis to beat to hell, not worry about breaking, and never tune the edges on (and just give the occassional wax for when you aren't clearing the table tops). aside from that, i agree with the general opinion of others thus far that:

1) don't get a race-carver, but a more versatile ski in the 78-82mm waist range (with wood core, metal, and sidewall construction, of course)

2) if you have 3 skis, then skip the mantra and go straight for the goat, because any day that is too firm for you to not enjoy it, you will have ALREADY known not to take it out in the first place. i own the mantra, and it was the first ski i bought for my quiver, because it was a good starting point, in that it is a very "middle-of-the-road" ski. BUT now that i'm building my quiver out in both directions, i am stuck with a mid-point that is not really where i wanted it to be. i'd say get the mantra if it's the ONE-AND-ONLY ski that you get, but not if you can have 3 skis
post #11 of 18
Thread Starter 
Glen - I found the PE's great fun, apart from a couple of days towards the end of the season on morning ice / boiler in Whistler where I couldn't hold an edge at all. Doesn't bust through crud but kind of skips over so as long as you don't mind getting bucked and taking some air its all fun. Carving ok, bumps good as they are pretty soft and fine in the steeps and powder although could do with a little more float. Didn't really find any problems with skiing very fast on piste as others have said here.

Lukc - any experience of park type stuff on the goats, are they heavy for jumping into switch on piste or are they OK ?
post #12 of 18
Dook! I kinda agree with you here, but way to harsh on the future product endorsements. \

Repeat after me: "We all need big quivers" "I don't have enough skis" "I can buy that turn, and so can you"

Quote:
Originally Posted by dookey67 View Post
i'm going to throw a wrench in the mix.

after going through 2 quivers over the past 3 seasons (each quiver consisting of 5 skis) i have come to the conclusion that one really only needs 2 pairs of skis.

1. an every day ski
in my case this season it was the 188 Lib Tech NAS Freeride

2. a powder ski
in my case this season it was 185 Volant Spatulas.

The other 3 skis in my quiver rarely, if ever, got used. In fact, I believe I will retire one pair, sell off the other, and the remaining one will rotate as my every day ski with the Lib Techs (or, since the Libs are mounted for BC, I may switch the binders and make the remaining ski, the AK King Salmon, my BC ski and the Libby's the every day).

But I digress...the truth of the matter is that after spending 3 seasons putting together a quiver to do it all, i learned that keeping things simple is best.

in the past when i was spending all my time deciding which skis to take on trips (often packing all 5 pairs), i was never really getting to know any of the skis personally.

this season i kept taking all my skis with me on trips and ended up only skiing the Libbys and Spats.

several of my core (as in the folks i ride with the most) only rock 2 pairs of skis, as well--1 every day pair that's usually in the upper 80s to 90s underfoot, 1 pair of powder planks in the 125+ range.

really, i think that's all you need (at least if you ride in Cali and Colo).

but then that's just me and what i've learned after 3 years of trying to find the perfect quiver. it just seems that simpler is better (of course i'm looking to purchase another pair of Libby's, but just as a back-up pair to the ones i currently have).

i say get 2 skis...one good everyday ripper and one serious powder set and you'll be good to go.
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Straightliner View Post
Glen - I found the PE's great fun, apart from a couple of days towards the end of the season on morning ice / boiler in Whistler where I couldn't hold an edge at all. Doesn't bust through crud but kind of skips over so as long as you don't mind getting bucked and taking some air its all fun. Carving ok, bumps good as they are pretty soft and fine in the steeps and powder although could do with a little more float. Didn't really find any problems with skiing very fast on piste as others have said here.
Excellent! I appreciate the feedback!

On another note, now is a great time to score some deals on the 08 skis. :
post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Straightliner View Post
Lukc - any experience of park type stuff on the goats, are they heavy for jumping into switch on piste or are they OK ?
i have NOT skied the gotama in park... or at ALL. but i HAVE skied the line sir francis bacon (182cm long, 115mm in the waist, wood core/sidewall construction), which should be similar in weight to the stiffer, but narrower 183 gotama. when i used to spend 50% of my time being a park rat, i LOVED long, fat, heavy park skis, but that was because i was hitting HUGE jumps (6-10+ foot lips and 40-80 foot tables at big bear and mammoth) and liked the slow spinning feel and the super smooth landings that they gave. i skied the line sfb's after i had to give that kind of park skiing up, and i found that they were JUST comfortable spinning 3's off of the smaller (20-30 foot table) jumps that i hit now. i have never been a huge jibber, but they also do fine on rails and boxes.

so, in short, even though the goats are a bit stiffer than any ski that i have taken in the park, if you are a fairly profficient park skier and if you aren't spinning much beyond 3 (or if you like BIG jumps and enjoy the feel of a slow, laid back spin), then the gotamas will be fine for some park fun. and i can carve my mantras switch at mach stupid, so i'm sure you'll be fine on the goats just for some switch riding. BUT, i would add that if you are into any kind of jibbing at all, then still keep a park-specific stick for that. i have only ONE ski that i will let touch a rail or box, because, like i said earlier, you can beat the hell out of it and never worry about it breaking, and never sharpen the edges. but if all you're looking for is a ski you can do some jumps with on a softer day, then the gotama is fine.
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post
Dook! I kinda agree with you here, but way to harsh on the future product endorsements. \

Repeat after me: "We all need big quivers" "I don't have enough skis" "I can buy that turn, and so can you"

See, that's the thing. You can only go so far with the "I can buy that turn" philosophy before you learn that it's not the ski, it's the operator.

Certainly some skis will cover up a lot of operator error, but only for so long.

There comes a point where you just have to pick a ski and make it your biznatch.

I have had the 5 ski quiver for 3 seasons and over the past two seasons I only used 2 skis religiously. Last year it was the King Salmon and the Spatula. This season it was the Lib Tech and the Spatula. I was skiing in Tahoe, Wyoming, Utah, and Colo predominantly, and I kept returning to the same two skis. The Libs for everyday and the Spats for pow. Most of my regular riding partners only have two skis, as well (Bros for everyday, Praxis for pow, being a prime example).

Of course it's cool to have other skis, but I'm finding that going simpler may actually be better.

However, in this OP's case, it sounds like 3 is the magic number: 1 everyday, 1 park, 1 pow.

I can't argue against that since after this season I'll be down to 3, as well, more or less (gonna retire some and sell the others, pick up some back-ups of the models I already have).

The bottomline is that for me the initial rush of having a massive quiver has slowly faded and I'm more intent on rectifying my on-going back-seat driving problem with the gear I already have rather than trying to go through another round of skis in an attempt to "buy a turn."

post #16 of 18
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the responses everyone.

Looks like IM82's and Gotamas it is then
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Straightliner View Post
Thanks for the responses everyone.

Looks like IM82's and Gotamas it is then
good call. not that i've ridden either, but after learning how to "design" a quiver this season (i had a mishap where i was going to have to start over with a blank sheet instead of just addding skis one at a time), i think you've got your bases covered the best that you can without having so many skis that it's pointless
post #18 of 18
Hey not to hijack the thread, but Dookey- how do you like the wiggly edges on those NAS boards? I have been wondering what it feels like and if it's just a gimmick that makes it harder to sharpen edges or if it's legitimitely kick-ass enough to justify the tune effort... I'm very curious about them...
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