EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › When is a new ski too old to buy?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

When is a new ski too old to buy?

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
Hey,
Newbie here, I appreciate surfing this site and gleaning so much info about gear related topics, and now I have a question:
I started skiing again about 3 years ago , and ski in Vermont ,Quebec, N.H.. I ski about 15 -20 times a yr, and I would consider myself an improving intermediate;I loving carving on blues and some blacks, other blacks I take cautiously. I bought a pair of entry level Volkls- S2's- in 2005 and they've served me well, but after this season I know I need to step up a little higher.
I've been noticing a lot of stock sell- off type sales online right now, and there are some good bargains on some "new" older skis (I'm most familiar with Volkls), such as Supersport S5's, or Allstars. These have been sitting in shops/ showrooms now for 2-3 years.
Is there any reason not to buy 2 year old skis? Do they lose something (flex?) by sitting for that length of time?
While I would love to throw 1000$ on some Tigersharks or what have you, if I could get an older model for half of that ,or so......
thanks.
post #2 of 21
Welcome to epic.

I just bought a pair of New 2002 GS skis.

IMO, ski designs change and improvements are often made, but the 2002 ski is as good today as it was in 2002. If you're fighting for FIS points, then you want the latest newest improvements, but if you're just skiing, then why waste your money. Of course it depends on the ski; some old skis were ahead of their time; some new skis are unchanged except for graphics. I suppose there could be some deterioration in the material, but I'm pretty sure it's minimal.
post #3 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by mischt70 View Post
Hey,
Newbie here, I appreciate surfing this site and gleaning so much info about gear related topics, and now I have a question:
I started skiing again about 3 years ago , and ski in Vermont ,Quebec, N.H.. I ski about 15 -20 times a yr, and I would consider myself an improving intermediate;I loving carving on blues and some blacks, other blacks I take cautiously. I bought a pair of entry level Volkls- S2's- in 2005 and they've served me well, but after this season I know I need to step up a little higher.
I've been noticing a lot of stock sell- off type sales online right now, and there are some good bargains on some "new" older skis (I'm most familiar with Volkls), such as Supersport S5's, or Allstars. These have been sitting in shops/ showrooms now for 2-3 years.
Is there any reason not to buy 2 year old skis? Do they lose something (flex?) by sitting for that length of time?
While I would love to throw 1000$ on some Tigersharks or what have you, if I could get an older model for half of that ,or so......
thanks.
Say what? Why would you pay $1000 for Tigersharks when you can get the Tigershark 12 Foot for $480, including shipping. Take a look at www.sierrasnowboard.com

You need to surf the site a little more and find out about the deals.
post #4 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJB View Post
A wonderful site with lots of info. I just scored nice late season deal a few weeks ago.
post #5 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
Welcome to epic.

I just bought a pair of New 2002 GS skis.

IMO, ski designs change and improvements are often made, but the 2002 ski is as good today as it was in 2002. If you're fighting for FIS points, then you want the latest newest improvements, but if you're just skiing, then why waste your money. Of course it depends on the ski; some old skis were ahead of their time; some new skis are unchanged except for graphics. I suppose there could be some deterioration in the material, but I'm pretty sure it's minimal.
+1, Buying new skis is liking buying a new car. Many folks prefer current new equipment or the latest design, style, etc. Others have no issues with buying last years' leftovers & saving some bucks. Buying leftovers is certainly the better value approach.

Fundamentally, if a ski is stored properly (no sign of rust), then it is the same as the day it was built. Skis simply do not "lose" stiffness or damping, change flex, etc. when sitting there. I remember when sintered bottoms came out, some said they needed to be waxed or they would change over time. I believe this is a urban rumor.
post #6 of 21
It's not that designs change, it's that engineers make skis easier to ride.

sure, a 10yo GS ski in your closet that has only seen 10 days on snow is going to lay trenches. It'll also require horse legs just to turn.

number-of-days is what breaks down a ski. When people speak of an old ski, this is to which they refer. Nonetheless, newer is usually easier... and more fun.
post #7 of 21
I have no issues buying a 1-2 year old ski -- often the deals can be quite good. Anything older than about 2-3 years may be falling behind the curve, depending on the ski and model. Needs to be evaluated on a case by case basis.

I tend to find the best deals on closeout skis at the end of the season (ie, buying 07/08 skis right now). If you know where to look -- and the sources on this site can be helpful -- then you can often get a ski that's less than 6 months old for 50-70% off. No kidding. I know people that pay more for 2-3 year old skis at a ski shop or on eBay than I have paid for current-season skis through the various deals that pop up here on Epic. So, shop carefully!
post #8 of 21
My 2 cents.. if you are on a budget and you are on novice skis, a step up to a more advanced ski will still be a step up. The question is: Is it worth the extra money for MORE of a step up. I just bought a set of 05-06 Metrons this season, and it was worth every penny... It's not worth an extra couple/few hundred dollars for slightly more performance to me.
post #9 of 21
Four years, seven months, eighteen days, six hours, thirty two minutes and forty nine seconds.

After that they're just no good.
post #10 of 21
After seven years they're called 'nordic'.
post #11 of 21
I just bought some 03-04 year boots
post #12 of 21
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the advice and the links, I`ll definitely keep searching around in here for some "epic" deals, and I`ll start my clock ticking as soon as I buy them, Maggot... 4 yrs....
post #13 of 21
Some types of skis hold up better than others, in the sense that they change less dramatically. Two or three year old carver/race training models like Rossi OS's, Volkl Racing Motions, Atomic pb's, for instance, don't seem to be a lot different than current models except for the graphics and a few minor bells and whistles. I suspect that's because they don't sell well, so the companies don't want to put a lot of RD into them. Midfats, OTOH, are outdated by the time they hit the store.

Then there are "classics" like 04 Goats that are sought by aficionados because they have special attributes like a flex that's changed since, some like the older design. I think powder skis lend themselves to this since they have comparatively simple constructions, no system bindings etc.
post #14 of 21
Before you buy, check how old the design of the ski actually is (if you can) since often the ski will stay the same for 2-3 years with just a change in topsheet. You can check by reading around and comparing sidecuts etc between years. This means that buying it in it's final year will make it go 'out of date' far quicker.

That said, I have just bought some Atomic SL12pb and I think the design has been the same for a while but will apparently stay the same for '09 As beyond said, they seem to keep race ski design the same longer than all mountin etc. skis.
post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
After seven years they're called 'nordic'.

Too funny!
post #16 of 21
if you go too far back, you may find the topsheets to be printed with embarrassing, outdated buzzwords. to get the latest in buzzword technology, you've really got to go with a brand new model. i mean really, would anyone today be caught dead with "kevlar" branded on their skis?
post #17 of 21
too funny, i had a pair of kevlar-ceramic...did I also mention they were day glo pink and yellow?
post #18 of 21
If they are shapes with pointy tips. They are too old.

If there is any pink on them

If the bindings are bare aluminum

If they are 200 CM SLs.
post #19 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Schussboelie View Post

Too funny!
Credit to telerod15, years ago.
post #20 of 21
I've heard some BS from a shop years ago about the fiberglass degrading, but that's all it is....BS. They weren't a very good shop.

I still ski on some skis from 15 years ago - early design powder skis. They are in great shape still.

At this point, the average mid-fat ski isn't changing very much. If it was good then, it's good now.

However, something like the S5 or allstar has gone out of style because most people have figured out that narrow, stiff carving skis just aren't very good all around skis, even in the east. If you want step up your game, look for a midfat.
post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highway Star View Post
At this point, the average mid-fat ski isn't changing very much. If it was good then, it's good now.
However, something like the S5 or allstar has gone out of style because most people have figured out that narrow, stiff carving skis just aren't very good all around skis, even in the east. If you want step up your game, look for a midfat.
Some good points...I thought the Allstar was a good all around ski until I replaced them in December with some mid-fats which I like much better and ski at a longer length too (184's). Will never go back to a narrower ski again.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › When is a new ski too old to buy?