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How long does it take to learn how to Ski powder? - Page 2

post #31 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cold Smoke View Post
Where do you ski? We had a mediocre ski year at Kirkwood (468 inches) and I think I still had at least 10 bottomless days. Of course it doesn't take a whole lot of west coast sierra cement for bottomless conditions. I've skied Rocky Mountain fluff and I agree, you just blow right through that stuff like it's not even there. Not really bottomless in the Rockies unless you have a couple of feet.
its should also be noted that bigger/longer/ funshapes make somedays bottomless for you and not for next guy. My thugs can float in as little as 5-7inches of snow if its dense enough.
post #32 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cold Smoke View Post
Where do you ski? We had a mediocre ski year at Kirkwood (468 inches) and I think I still had at least 10 bottomless days. Of course it doesn't take a whole lot of west coast sierra cement for bottomless conditions. I've skied Rocky Mountain fluff and I agree, you just blow right through that stuff like it's not even there. Not really bottomless in the Rockies unless you have a couple of feet.
Mid-atlantic. Don't ask me to tell you how bad this past season sucked. I only had one legitimate local powder day this season; the rest were in Utah, where I did get two bottomless days and a bunch of 8-10" days, thankfully.
post #33 of 45
6-7 minutes, 10 tops!
post #34 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by epl View Post
one turn. kind of like learning to ride a bike, once it clicks, you'll know it, and you'll never forget how.
Quote:
Originally Posted by twoturn View Post
6-7 minutes, 10 tops!
I learned in a few days in 1994 on mogul skis. That technique was nothing like modern fat skis.

the notion that powder takes time to learn comes from those who A) learned to ski pow more than a decade ago and B) from those who still don't own fat skis.

I guess there would be one significant difference between piste and pow. Piste = pressure to carve... Pow = unweight to float.

It's kind of like learning rails- you think the metal is going to be slower than the snow, then you step on it and your feet slide out from under you. In pow, you think you have to push (as you do on piste) and your skis dive.
post #35 of 45
This year, I had the pleasure of skiing in 40 cm of fresh eastern snow. There is a big difference between that and skiing in deep snow, even the deep wet snow you get on Vancouver Island.
post #36 of 45

my .02

I just picked up skiing this year after doing it as a kid. If you are good on the frontside there is no reason you can't be good in powder at the end of 1 day. You don't need a formal lesson either. It would help to ski with someone who is proficient at it already and can throw a few tips your way but there is no way it should take you 10 powder days to ski it well. All you do is throw a little more speed into it, maybe lean back a little???, and not work as hard. Your entire base becomes an edge in powder so you don't have to tip it as far. I understand people having trouble with crud or skied off powder runs with bumped up snow but to have trouble with fresh untracked powder for more than a run or two is hard to believe for a good groomed skier. For those of you that say you don't have to lean back at all, I'll agree on steeper slopes but I can't help it when it isn't very steep. Can't say I care too much either way. You wont find a bigger smile on the mountain than mine on a powder day. Have fun with it, point'em down hill and let it rip. If you're an average to above average skier and you can't make it down an untracked powder run easily after a full day of skiing, find a new sport!
post #37 of 45
Just ******* point em'. IF you can't ski the goods stay the **** in texas
post #38 of 45
I learned pow
skiing pretty quickly
like within a day...
post #39 of 45
This thread has generated a lot of interest and it seems that the general opinion is that if you are good enough on the groomed, you will be quick to pick up the powder, so I started another thread ---

http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=69713
Titled How long --- ski powder follow up

I am hoping that it might generate some hints and tips to help skiiers that are trapped in the midwest and east (to do on their home mountain or hill) that will help them make a quicker transition to the powder they will hopefully run into during a trip out west.

If you have some suggestions, please link over and contribute.
post #40 of 45
What kind of powder we talking about here. Are we talking 24 inches of dry bottomless Utah powder? Are we talking about 24 inches of wet cement powder with a 1 inch topping of frozen crust? The latter can be a bit of a challenge and can take a life time to learn. Mainly because most folks don't want to ski in that crap. It all depends on what turns you on. The point is just when you think your getting good, mother nature throws you a curve ball and says hahaha, you thought you were good hey. :
post #41 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by catskills View Post
What kind of powder we talking about here. Are we talking 24 inches of dry bottomless Utah powder? Are we talking about 24 inches of wet cement powder with a 1 inch topping of frozen crust? The latter can be a bit of a challenge and can take a life time to learn. Mainly because most folks don't want to ski in that crap. It all depends on what turns you on. The point is just when you think your getting good, mother nature throws you a curve ball and says hahaha, you thought you were good hey. :
Good point. You get to your favorite mountain on any given day and never know if you're going to find dry champagne powder or 4 or 5 feet of wet heavy mank. You have to be prepared to ski whatever mother nature gives you. A lot of people don't like to ski windpack, I hear a lot of bitching and moaning on windpack powder days. Personally I like the stuff, it's a little grabby and you have to be precise with your turns and movements but the surface tension keeps you up top and lets you build speed. I guess the point is it takes awhile to learn to ski well in any and all fresh snow conditions and the only way you're going to do that is to ski a lot of fresh snow days.
post #42 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by catskills View Post
What kind of powder we talking about here. Are we talking 24 inches of dry bottomless Utah powder? Are we talking about 24 inches of wet cement powder with a 1 inch topping of frozen crust? The latter can be a bit of a challenge and can take a life time to learn. Mainly because most folks don't want to ski in that crap. It all depends on what turns you on. The point is just when you think your getting good, mother nature throws you a curve ball and says hahaha, you thought you were good hey. :
So true. Back when I couldn't ski east coast powder, I went west and had no problem with thier lighter version from the first turn. I finally learned how to ski east coast mank in one run also, but only after many, many failed attempts before the light bulb went on....
post #43 of 45
I find the more you ski and the more you're willing to explore, the more variable the ski conditions you will encounter. I was at Whistler last year and decided to hike into Flute Bowl one day after a storm. There was a thin rain crust on top of about 2 feet of fresh snow. Not fun. I did some zigzag traverses interspersed with some violent hop turns all the way down. And don't even get me started on the snow I find in the backcountry. So no, I don't think you can expect to ski any and all fresh snow conditions well instantly. It takes time.
post #44 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cold Smoke View Post
I find the more you ski and the more you're willing to explore, the more variable the ski conditions you will encounter. I was at Whistler last year and decided to hike into Flute Bowl one day after a storm. There was a thin rain crust on top of about 2 feet of fresh snow. Not fun. I did some zigzag traverses interspersed with some violent hop turns all the way down. And don't even get me started on the snow I find in the backcountry. So no, I don't think you can expect to ski any and all fresh snow conditions well instantly. It takes time.
A few years ago, We got 18 inches ending with freezing rain. The crust wasn't thick enough to hold my weight, so my shins wound up acting like ice breakers. One snowboarding Ski Patroller taped a piece of tower pad to the shin of his leading leg. I got a call that they needed help shoveling out the lift on the west side, so I grabbed a shovel and headed down Annapurna, the steepest narrowest trail. Aftrer the first couple of turns, I decided I needed more turning room, so I exited right and started going down Westway, also steep, but VERY wide. After a few turns down there, I decided steep wasn't my friend and exited right again, heading down Clair's way, not 1/3 as wide as Westway, but not as steep. My first turn into Clairs, my skis stopped and I launched. As I was still in the air, I threw the shovel so as not to land on it. Unfortunately I threw it where I was about to land and my forehead hit the blade of the shovel, leaving a very distinct shovel imprint on my forehead for the rest of the day (pre-helmet days). Once the crust got broken up, it turned out to be a great day, but....
Yes, not all powder is created equal.
post #45 of 45
Two turns... in each direction.
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