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MA requested - a few clips

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Hi y'all,

Long time lurker with bursts of activity here. I have, for the first time, a few videos of myself skiing. This is a pleasant novelty, and though my season is likely over, I'd love to have some points to carry with me into next season.

Perhaps I'll leave my background out of this - I'm sure you can guess - I also have plenty of thoughts about my own skiing which I'll share as the thread progresses; I'd prefer not to color things from the outset!

so,

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RmDimo_HKGM

Shot, as noted in the vid, on Silver King at park city. Groomed but oddly lumpy rapidly-melting snow. Steep enough that it'd make for an uncomfortable GS course.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1IZ56mAB3mE

This is on Dynamite, also at PC. Info on skis/etc on youtube

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fw8XmL_hYPw

Thrown in a bit on a whim. Most important note: these are the big skis, supermojo 103s in a 193. I wish I had, instead, my super-g turns down the cirque at snowbird on video - then the skis would make more sense


Fire away!

G
post #2 of 13
The first video doesn't show too much though, does it?

In the beginning of the second video it looks like you're a bit in the backseat.
What I'dmainly like to see is some more pole action though and that doesn't even imply a poleplant.
I think a more effective use of the poles/arms will give you better balance and a more fluent transition, especially in the shorter turns.
Just keep your hands up and forward a bit more, or at least take them there right before transition.
I kinda see the same thing in the third video but again, they are all pretty short and a shot taken from behind isn't all that informative.

I also like to see the knees a bit more apart in GS turns but that's just me. I believe it creates better angulation and less hip in the turn. The upper body will be more straight up.
post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 
thanks for the feedback - I've never used a double pole plant, and in arc-arc skiing on groomers, I've never really used a single pole plant either (though there's plenty of planting in the third video). I should probably attempt to get forward more in transition, perhaps beginning by getting my hands in front just before transition begins.

Regarding knee separation - in the first two clips, I'm skiing with a lot of separation between my skis and, correspondingly, my knees. If there's a lack of upper and lower body separation, I can't imagine knee separation is the cause.

I think the fact that not much comes through in the first video must be a youtube quality issue - if anyone's interested in hosting a few movies for me, I'd appreciate it!
post #4 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glytch View Post
thanks for the feedback - I've never used a double pole plant, and in arc-arc skiing on groomers, I've never really used a single pole plant either (though there's plenty of planting in the third video). I should probably attempt to get forward more in transition, perhaps beginning by getting my hands in front just before transition begins.
Exactly my point.
I don't think you need a double plole plant or even a single one in arc to arc skiing on groomers, lord knows I hardly ever use one.
But just thinking about doing it, or just bringing the pole forward (with or without touching the surface isn't even important) will help you get a more forward stance at the beginning of the turn, which is what you need when dropping in the fall line.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Glytch View Post
Regarding knee separation - in the first two clips, I'm skiing with a lot of separation between my skis and, correspondingly, my knees. If there's a lack of upper and lower body separation, I can't imagine knee separation is the cause.
Actually you're right.
I just had another look and the knees/legs are pretty seperated, my bad.

Overall some really good skiing though, forgot to point that out in my first post!!
post #5 of 13
Glytch,

Back seat? That's not the back seat. It's almost the floor boards!

In the second clip, as you go by the camera, you can see your butt below your knees. To be fair, this is not necessarily bad in high performance skiing and you did have a little "that doesn't count" bobble at the end of the turn. But overall, you do let the skis get pretty far ahead of you as you sink down to pressure the skis.

I like the carving action and the athleticism on display here. I also like the edge engagement above the fall line. I'm seeing a little park and ride action after the edges engage and a little tilting to the inside of the turn. I'd like to see you finish your turns more (e.g. the second to last turn in the second clip) and raise the inside hand a little higher to level the shoulders to the pitch of the slope. This will put you into a position to start your turns with a "fore-agonal" movement. That will let you make arced turns that get your butt close to the snow without getting too much in the back seat.
post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the feedback, rusty!

I definitely ride the tail of the ski a little more than I should, though I'm generally more forward than the turn directly in front of the camera indicates (that bobble was the result of some substantial irregularity in the snow - if I go frame by frame, my outside ski tip deflects very subsantially and knocks me back). I also tend to have a right hand that likes to sink and a left hand that likes to rise, as well as a somewhat dominant right leg - I'll work on consciously squaring up during left-footed turns.

I think one thing I really need to work on is having a stronger, longer outside leg. This'd help me keep my hips forward w.r.t. my feet while also maintaining a stronger platform. I'm not sure, though, how to go about that change... I think I often initiate turns with a long outside leg, but actually shorten my leg a bit throughout the turn (perhaps I should shorten it a bit more abruptly at the end of the turn?) - what can I focus on to bring my hips up and forward and correspondingly use a straighter leg?

Finally, re: park and ride; I assume that you're referring to a static edge angle for a section through the middle of the turn? I'm not sure I see it in the clips above except for my turns on the flat portion of the second video - do you see 'parking and riding' elsewhere in the clip? I do have some other clips (of even shakier video, unfortunately, hence their absence here) in which I ride the skis at a fixed edge angle through the body - I think I generally use that strategy to stand in a strong skeletal position when the snow is variable and/or too soft to build a really large edge angle in the body of the turn... this is especially true with SL skis on soft snow - I've had to tone down edge angles because of skis washing out (or burrowing disconcertingly into) soft snow, particularly spring corn/slush. Does that make sense from a strategic standpoint? I don't really think about it while skiing... what can I do to keep a dynamically varying edge angle on soft/variable snow?

A lot of interesting things to think about...

Thanks,
G
post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 
also, I'm still lookin' for a place I can dump .mp4s or .movs online so y'all have access to frame-by-frame video! Any server offers or suggestions ?
post #8 of 13
Thread Starter 
.... and finally, one last question I meant to ask:

in the first clip, which is prob not so easy to analyze (and maybe even a bit disorienting) w/o frame-by-frame access, I'm happy though not ecstatic with my edge angles and upper/lower body separation, but there's one thing that really bugs me: the amount of traversing I get stuck with during transition. It's a fairly steep pitch for GS-sized arcs, and I'm happy that my turns are reasonably sized... but I seem to get almost stuck as I finish the turn and pass through transition - I'd love to make the same turns but with a smaller traverse between them. How can I begin to make that happen?

Thanks again...
g
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Finally, re: park and ride; I assume that you're referring to a static edge angle for a section through the middle of the turn?
Quote:
but there's one thing that really bugs me: the amount of traversing I get stuck with during transition.
That's park and ride. One hallmark of top level skiing is the smooth and continuous movement of body parts. The problem is that in order to get there, you have to master all of the movements necessary for them to work in harmony. And to master a movement, most people need to isolate that movement to work on it. It's kind of a catch 22. But in the end we want to see the skis always turning, the edge angles always changing, the legs always changing length, etc. Park and ride often comes from over pressuring the edge, having it engage and start turning so much that you back off and let the skis do all of the work. We want to let the skis do a lot of the work, but we want that effort to be spread throughout the whole turn and not just the bottom of it.

Quote:
(perhaps I should shorten it a bit more abruptly at the end of the turn?)
Nope. Abrupt movements generally either get you out of trouble or get you in trouble. If you're not in trouble, don't use them.

Quote:
what can I focus on to bring my hips up and forward and correspondingly use a straighter leg?
I've got an indoor drill that I've recommended a billion times. I'll go look for it and link it later. On snow, the key is bending the new inside leg at the end of the old turn (that's the leg you wanted to get long - some people call this "flex to release"). From going straight down the fall line until the point where you going straight down the fall line again in the next turn, you want to be shortening the outside leg of the old turn which turns into the inside leg of the new turn. That movement helps you to change edges and move the hips forward into the new turn. But it's not just bending the leg (knee over the toes). It's tipping it too. The combination of forward movement + lateral movement is the "fore-agonal" movement I mentioned in the first post.


Quote:
what can I do to keep a dynamically varying edge angle on soft/variable snow?
You need to stay more centered first and make the same movements in slow speed over a smaller range of motion. But please note that the default movements you use to make turns aren't going to work as well in softer snow.


Here are two drills you can try:
Hold both ski poles vertically so that the tips drag in the snow at all times throughout each entire turn. This will force you to keep your shoulders level to the pitch of the slope and stop you from leaning into turns.

Try a series of one turns to a stop "traversing" across a trail (note - pick a wide trail with little traffic). Pick an angle across the trail to start on, start out on almost flat skis going straight, then turn up hill only by rolling onto your uphill edges. Pick a progressively steeper starting line so that your tuns get more shaped (i.e. a bigger dip down the hill before starting back up). See how high back up the hill you can go before you come to a stop. Now take that shape turn and rotate it 90 degrees. Keep the same speed + smoothness of leg/feet movements as you did in the traverse.
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glytch View Post
Thanks for the feedback, rusty!
I think one thing I really need to work on is having a stronger, longer outside leg. This'd help me keep my hips forward w.r.t. my feet while also maintaining a stronger platform. I'm not sure, though, how to go about that change... I think I often initiate turns with a long outside leg, but actually shorten my leg a bit throughout the turn (perhaps I should shorten it a bit more abruptly at the end of the turn?) - what can I focus on to bring my hips up and forward and correspondingly use a straighter leg?
Thanks,
G
I think this is the key, to get one thing: push your inner leg back a bit, that will help you get the hip forward. And try to keep your feet parallel.
It's ok to shorten the leg throughout the turn, you'll end up on an inner ski if you don't.
In one sequence you get a lift on your inner leg and notice how it's the tip that's in the air = backseat driving, get your knees and arms forward when you're at your lowest position.
post #11 of 13
Park and ride for sure. It means you body is essentially "stuck" or "parked" in one position the whole time...and you just ride the ski.....

Essentially you need to add flexion/extention to your skiing. When you fix that the resulting extension will help get you "re-centered" with your hips up and forward...it will give you greater performance.

Most noticably in that 3rd clip you are getting bounced all over the place....

The simplest drill for this is shown in the starter video of TDk6's "this is up-unweighting thread"......the timing of the movements will take some work...but for now just work on moving.....later you can work on the timing of them....for those gs turns, you will generally be flexing into the transition and extending into the fall-line.
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glytch View Post
.... and finally, one last question I meant to ask:

in the first clip, which is prob not so easy to analyze (and maybe even a bit disorienting) w/o frame-by-frame access, I'm happy though not ecstatic with my edge angles and upper/lower body separation, but there's one thing that really bugs me: the amount of traversing I get stuck with during transition. It's a fairly steep pitch for GS-sized arcs, and I'm happy that my turns are reasonably sized... but I seem to get almost stuck as I finish the turn and pass through transition - I'd love to make the same turns but with a smaller traverse between them. How can I begin to make that happen?

Thanks again...
g
Try to get advantage of the power you build up trough the turn, when you get to the end release the pressure and try to (smooth) shift direction by letting your upper body dive into next turn.
post #13 of 13
glytch,

I really like your skiing, it is rippin and fun to watch. I agree with some of the comments above, but not all. You get a little squatty in the second clip and that disipates some of the energy toward the end of the turn. A more consistant long outside leg will help. It appears you are back toward the end of the turn, but get a nice extention into the new turn which recenters you. I would like to see more movement as the turns develope. The movement that you do in the transition needs to be spread-out some throughout the turn (helping the park and ride).

What is really interesting is the third clip and how it relates to the GS turns in the first two. The movement through transition may be approiate for 0ff-piste skiing, but it also shows up in the GS turns on the groomers. There is an upward movement (more evedent in the second clip) in the transition that causes late edge engagement and thus the skid after the fall line as too much is happening there all at once. A more diagional movement into the new turn as you extend will cause more progressive edging early in the turn and will allow you to control the forces after the fall line and maybe also help you keep up with your equipment as you move into the transition.

I hope these comments help with what you are feeling as you ski. Keep on rippin', love your skiing.

RW
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