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Best Weekend Warrior Vehicles? - Page 6

post #151 of 170
They have a trailer model with 12" wheels for $270, which is hard to believe. Do you guys remember what the freight charges were? I have been wanting a simple trailer for when I bring home plywood and bags of mulch -- it's kind of unwieldy to get inside my car (though a couple sheets of plywood can go on my yakima racks no problem). This might fit the bill. I need to see what trailers cost at the local shops I guess.
post #152 of 170
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219 View Post
They have a trailer model with 12" wheels for $270, which is hard to believe. Do you guys remember what the freight charges were? I have been wanting a simple trailer for when I bring home plywood and bags of mulch -- it's kind of unwieldy to get inside my car (though a couple sheets of plywood can go on my yakima racks no problem). This might fit the bill. I need to see what trailers cost at the local shops I guess.

Be careful as not all the models fold if that's important to you. I bought mine with the 8" wheels and upgraded myself. As I recall the freight was pretty steep , like over $100 but I now live near a bunch of retail stores so it's no longer a problem. I think I've seen them at Northern Tool as well if you have them nearby.
post #153 of 170
I find that a Honda Element makes a very versatile thingy for me....

Get it with all-wheel drive, stick shift, blizzak snow tires and ugly steel wheels for the winter, performance tires with light-weight wheels the rest of the year, leave the 2 back seats in the garage and you'll have a winter/summer hauler that gives 26mpg and is kinda fun to drive..

Ground clearance is not outstanding, but if you go slowly you can get into real small rocky fishing spots in spring/summer, and to any ski area in winter...and no compound low gear, but stick shift helps...

Besides, I live in it 4-8 weeks in summer, climbing, camping, fishing, hiking around with a mtn and a road bike standing upright, and lots of gear and beer.

And Honda reliability....I put on 48000mi in 24months, and it has never been in to the dealer....100,000-mile major tuneups...

I highly recommend it,.... the most useful vehicle I've ever owned...altho not as much fun to drive as my 96 supercharged, race-ready Mazda Miata..

My .02 cents..
post #154 of 170
Quote:
Originally Posted by nfp158 View Post
I find that a Honda Element makes a very versatile thingy for me....

Get it with all-wheel drive, stick shift, blizzak snow tires and ugly steel wheels for the winter, performance tires with light-weight wheels the rest of the year, leave the 2 back seats in the garage and you'll have a winter/summer hauler that gives 26mpg and is kinda fun to drive..

Ground clearance is not outstanding, but if you go slowly you can get into real small rocky fishing spots in spring/summer, and to any ski area in winter...and no compound low gear, but stick shift helps...

Besides, I live in it 4-8 weeks in summer, climbing, camping, fishing, hiking around with a mtn and a road bike standing upright, and lots of gear and beer.

And Honda reliability....I put on 48000mi in 24months, and it has never been in to the dealer....100,000-mile major tuneups...

I highly recommend it,.... the most useful vehicle I've ever owned...altho not as much fun to drive as my 96 supercharged, race-ready Mazda Miata..

My .02 cents..


Yeah those are sweet rides and pretty decent sticker price also. I wonder how much mpg would be saved without the awd. 26 is pretty good though i guess. My girlfriends honda will turn 300,000 sometime this month. Seriously just regular stuff like brakes, belts, tires, ect... and it still runs really really good.
post #155 of 170
Quote:
Originally Posted by nfp158 View Post
I find that a Honda Element makes a very versatile thingy for me....

Get it with all-wheel drive, stick shift, blizzak snow tires and ugly steel wheels for the winter, performance tires with light-weight wheels the rest of the year, leave the 2 back seats in the garage and you'll have a winter/summer hauler that gives 26mpg and is kinda fun to drive..

Ground clearance is not outstanding, but if you go slowly you can get into real small rocky fishing spots in spring/summer, and to any ski area in winter...and no compound low gear, but stick shift helps...

Besides, I live in it 4-8 weeks in summer, climbing, camping, fishing, hiking around with a mtn and a road bike standing upright, and lots of gear and beer.

And Honda reliability....I put on 48000mi in 24months, and it has never been in to the dealer....100,000-mile major tuneups...

I highly recommend it,.... the most useful vehicle I've ever owned...altho not as much fun to drive as my 96 supercharged, race-ready Mazda Miata..

My .02 cents..
I am surprised it took 6 pages till someone mentioned the Element. I did consider the Element, but it was just a bit short inside and I liked the Subie AWD better.

Tell me about your Miata, Jackson Racing SC or Brandt's (BRP) set up?
post #156 of 170
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevesmith7 View Post
I've actually gotten pretty good at the whole fold/unfold thing. About ten minutes and I'm good to go. I've always found it easy to find an out of the way spot in the garage where it doesn't take up useful space. You should probably check the wheel bearings once and a while if you store it outside.
The issue I ran into was space unfortunately. But the trailer does well outside. I check the bearings at least yearly. I grease the bearing caps and hit the zerk on the inside of the hub with my grease gun.

I can't remember what freight was on the trailer; I bought it about 3-4 years ago.
post #157 of 170
Any trailer would have to stay outside for me (garage is already too full), so the folding aspect is not so important (but may help if I can lean it up against the back of my shed). I'm going to price up the local trailer options this week. We used to have a Northern nearby, but they either moved or closed.

I love the utility of the Honda Element, but what has kept it off my list is the range. It needs a bigger gas tank for my purposes. If they have a 2nd generation Element, I bet it will be an even better vehicle. Honda tends to really get it right the 2nd time around (they already came close on the first Element).
post #158 of 170
My mailman has the Element. It looks like a Mail carrier type of vehicle, but it seems to let him deliver in sleet, snow, wind, rain, and dead of night.

Gotta keep my ski deliveries coming.
post #159 of 170
Wouldn't parking at a ski resort with a trailer be a bit of a challenge? Seriously, what do you guys bring up to the hill with you?
post #160 of 170
I think we're talking about the trailer for home projects and camping. I haven't yet exceeded the cargo capacity of a regular car for ski trips! Though, the trailer would be awesome for a tailgate party.
post #161 of 170
Our newest Ski vehicle is a Mazda CX-7 AWD. Worked great this winter going back and forth from Denver area up to the mountains and all around up in the mountains in the snow. I wouldn't use it in the mountains/snow without snow tires though. The tires that it comes with are more summer/performance tires.

I've had Subara Forester, Audi A4 Quattros (2 of them) and my wife is currently driving a Saab 92-x (Subaru WRX clone) made by Subaru.

I do think the AWD systems in the Subarus and the Audi are better then the Mazda. Although with snow tires it doesn't seem to make a difference.

A couple of things I haven't liked about Subarus that caused me to get the Mazda. 1. The interior on the Subaru wasn't that nice. 2. The interior build quality was pretty cheap. A lot of plastic. Things that would break fairly easily. 3. Paint quality was crappy. Lots of chips from rocks compared to other paint jobs.

I would have gotten another Audi, but didn't want to spend the extra money on it right now. Mazda CX-7 was fairly inexpensive 25-30k and had a decent turbo engine (240hp). Nicer interior then the Subaru and a little more arm room.
post #162 of 170

Sometimes one's answer isn't intuitive

Not a big or cheap option, but our 260 hp/6 cyl. BMW X3 gets better gas mileage than the 165 hp/4 cyl. Subaru Legacy wagon it replaced (over the same roads and with the same load, i.e. box on top, back fully loaded). Go figure.
post #163 of 170
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
Wouldn't parking at a ski resort with a trailer be a bit of a challenge? Seriously, what do you guys bring up to the hill with you?
I think the trailer is for the "Home Depot/Lowes Utility variable of the "Weekend Warriar" equation.
post #164 of 170
The Pinarello Prince is great for the long hauls. If the roads are rough I'd look at something like the Santa Cruz Nomad. Around town for stop and go jaunts I like to use the Trek 69er.

Quit wasting money on giant cars, you're over packing if you need a huge vehicle. Get on your bike and pedal
post #165 of 170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
I am surprised it took 6 pages till someone mentioned the Element. I did consider the Element, but it was just a bit short inside and I liked the Subie AWD better.

Tell me about your Miata, Jackson Racing SC or Brandt's (BRP) set up?


Phil,
It's the JR supercharger with a bigger pulley and knock sensors...
Also the JR water injection system, into the intake ...
This gives good low-end performance, which I prefer to turbocharging, and the JR system is bullet-proof.
The car is lowered, Konis, larger sways, killer rubber on lite-wt SSR 15" wheels, race camber/caster setup...rides like a truck but will outhandle just about anything except formula1 cars...

Neil
post #166 of 170
Quote:
Originally Posted by billyymc View Post
Other car is an Odyssey minivan, also with snow tires. Yep, the dreaded minivan!! Laugh if you will, but it gets better gas mileage than any SUV of comparble storage space -- it can swallow a week's worth of camping stuff, plus bikes, plus kayaks. And it rides like a car, not a truck. I suppose the gas mileage suffers a bit when there are four kayaks and two bikes on the rack though
I have a 2002 Odyssey also that I take to Vt. and beyond often. It rides great, handles well and is very comfortable for long rides (stereo sucks though). It holds a ridiculous amount of cargo, especially with my huge Thule pod. However, I pray it doesn't snow because IMO, the Odyssey is the worst vehicle I have ever had in the snow. Traction is terrible. I'm OK on flat ground but the minute it starts getting steep I need a real good running start and then I pray.

On the other hand I have a 2000 Explorer that has full time AWD. That thing is an absolute monster off road. The traction is incredible and it actually handles very predictably in 10" of wet slop. Bit of a gas guzzler though.
post #167 of 170
Quote:
Originally Posted by nfp158 View Post
Phil,
It's the JR supercharger with a bigger pulley and knock sensors...
Also the JR water injection system, into the intake ...
This gives good low-end performance, which I prefer to turbocharging, and the JR system is bullet-proof.
The car is lowered, Konis, larger sways, killer rubber on lite-wt SSR 15" wheels, race camber/caster setup...rides like a truck but will outhandle just about anything except formula1 cars...

Neil
Mmmm SSR wheels, forged and light. Azenis or Hankooks?
post #168 of 170
Quote:
Originally Posted by carvemeister View Post
IMO, the Odyssey is the worst vehicle I have ever had in the snow. Traction is terrible. I'm OK on flat ground but the minute it starts getting steep I need a real good running start and then I pray.
Agree, which is why I put on the snow tires in the winter...makes all the difference in the world.
post #169 of 170
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
Wouldn't parking at a ski resort with a trailer be a bit of a challenge? Seriously, what do you guys bring up to the hill with you?
Given the size of some of the quivers in the "how big is your quiver?" thread, yeah, a trailer would be about right.

I went up once with a group of about 15 people in three vehicles. One was a crew cab pickup. The truck carried all the gear for the group in the bed--skis, poles, snowboards, and boots!: I carried my boots in my car, along with those of the folks that rode with me. We were the only ones with warm feet all day, 'cept one girl in the truck who had to warm hers up under the truck heater, just to get her feet into them.
post #170 of 170
Like many of the other posters, I am a Subie fan, too. I think they are overrated, however. I have an 06 EX V6 Honda Accord and a 4 cyl. 03 Subie Outback. My family of four skiers lives less than 2 hours from most of the mountains in mid to southern VT. Unless it is snowing heavily, which unfortunately does not happen all that often, we take the Accord when we go to VT. It is far more comfortable than the Subie. It has a lot more space in the rear seat for the kids and all of their stuff; doesn't need a ski rack because it has a center arm rest pass through; has far better acceleration, and much better handling, to safely pass all those VT drivers who never seem to be in a hurry to go anywhere (the OB is an absolute dog in comparison); has better gas mileage - 28 for the Accord, 22 for the OB; and drives like a tank in the snow with snow tires.

Granted, I'd much rather have the OB going up the Killington access road in 6 inches of snow, but the plowing in VT is so good that usually does not happen.
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