New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Small Base Delamination

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Base lifting up near edge, just slightly, about 10" along the edge.
On Atomic B5's.
Looking for suggestions on a fix. Lift the base up ,epoxy it and clamp?
I would appreciate any suggestions.
Cheers
Rick
post #2 of 17
I just got this thought after receiving a new pair of K2 PE's. THe PE's have rivets at the tips/tails to prevent delam. Has anyone ever tried rivets as a tool for preventing/fixing delam?
post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 

Small Base Delam.

This delam is under the foot, so no rivets. This will probably be ; a lift the base a bit, epoxy and clamp. I think. So am looking for advise.
The delam is small, the base has just lifted slightly right next to the edge. It has lifted about half the thickness of the edge.
Thanks
post #4 of 17
Clean thoroughly, heat, epoxy, clamp, heat, wait.
post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 

Small Base Delam.

Thanks for the advise !!
The base is just proud of the edge by the thickness of a finger nail, but deflects in when I press on it. It looks loose inward about 1cm.
Do you reccommend hair dryer - heat base up, lift it with something thin, inject some epoxy, clamp heat? Best epoxy to use?
Would drilling a tiny hole in the base material and injecting epoxy in work?
Cheers
Rick
post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 

Photos & Tools for Base Delam Repair

Anyone have photos or list of tools and specific details on repairing a base delam.
post #7 of 17
SVST recommended delam Epoxies:

Quote:
Devcon 2 ton Epoxy D2T 30 min. 12 hr. Clear X Good flexibility, for delams and edge repair.

Hysol Epoxi-Patch (General Clear) GPC 30 min. 6 hr. Clear X Slow set for flexible repairs on delams & when high strength is a concern.
Check out 'Bubble in Base' thread for additional info??
post #8 of 17
Thread Starter 

Base Delam

Thanks for the help.
This has to be fixed, and now I have lots of time. The resort closed with a 430cm base and still snowing............WAAAAA!
I am nervous about heating that base up and sliding and exacto knife along the edge and under the base and lifting. It will be a new experience for me. I will have to lift about 10" along the edge.
I will take some pics of the mess I make.
Cheers
Rick
post #9 of 17
Do you have some old skis to practice on first?
post #10 of 17
Thread Starter 

Base Delam

Good Idea - Thanks
I do have an old pair of beaters. I will practice on those first.
Thanks again
Rick
post #11 of 17
When you practice on your old skis you can afford to mess them up. Get an infraread thermometer and use that to check you temperature when you apply heat. Then you can easily monitor your work. I helped a friend with a similar problem many years ago. Had it all fixed except for patching a separate core shot near the delam. I left him alone for an hour and he had the bright idea to put the ski near a space heater to heat up the area where we were going to patch. When I got back, a three foot section of the entire base was in a puddle on the floor.
post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 

Base Delam.

Thanks for the tip.
What kind of tools did you use to lift up the base and hold it up while you did the epoxy job.
Cheers
Rick
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by rh338 View Post
Thanks for the tip.
What kind of tools did you use to lift up the base and hold it up while you did the epoxy job.
Cheers
Rick
I use dental picks, available online or at any electronics swap.
post #14 of 17
I resurrected an old thread because it's the issue that I'm having.  And I wanted to proved that I did search first.

Anyway, my questions is what causes this to happen?  I have this on my skis in various spots from the waist to the tail.  The skis were stone ground last November, used until Feb.  I do hot wax and sharpen my own ski.  I brought them to one shop to be stone ground again and they say they are delaminated and have pulled away from the core (?).  It isn't connected to what is under it for support and can't be perfectly repaired. Said it is probably caused by excessive heat from hot waxing.  It is only along the edges were the base meets the edge, only from the waist to the tail, about 4-8 inches long here and there.

Brought them to the shop were purchased (can't stone grind and only hand tunes) to see about warranty work.  They are going to contact Atomic (2 year warranty is from date of purchase).  The shop that sold them thinks it is not delaminated but they are just base high and that Atomic has put out tech bulletins stating that because of the all the metal in the ski, this is going to happen and is unique to the b5 (or something very close to that), and you shouldn't try to make them perfectly flat.  Said it was probably from my hand tuning.  I disagree because I only use a 750 and 1200 grit DMT on the bases for polishing and a gummy.  I did reset the sides to 3 deg. after the stone grind.  Even it I did file the bases, the PTex wouldn't be high in spots.  If I where to drag my finger nail from the edge to the base, I would feel the lip.  Move a few inches over and the lip is gone, keep going and it comes back.

Since I bought LT11's in Feb, these skis probably only had 12(ish) days on them and I'm pretty sure I would have only used the toko red wax on them.  I don't think I used any of the blue miserable stuff on the Metrons,  LT11's yes.  I would  have only sharpened them a handful of times.

I wish I had the skis to take a picture of but they are at the shop.

Any info or guidance on how this could have occurred or if it is a Metrpn B5 issue, would be greatly appreciated.  I'm trying to 1) build my case for warranty work and 2) if I did cause it, make sure I don't do it again.

Thanks,
Ken
post #15 of 17


This isn't my ski but it is the identical problem.   Found the picture in another thread here discussing this issue.
post #16 of 17
Interesting....

I just sold a pair of B5's that the base felt a little high in a few spots along the edge. I really hope that wasn't the start of the same problem you are having.

Seems like there is either a bad bond to the metal edge, or the heat has degraded the epoxy at that point, probably because the base is (likely) at it's thinnest there and the edges are going to be very effective at conducting heat.
post #17 of 17
If hot waxing is part of skiing, the design should support this.  I might not be the best tuner in the world, but I am very careful so if it was caused by heat, there was something else making it more susceptable.  All my other skis, daughters skis and friends skis were done the same way and none had this issue.  Almost all of them are Atomic.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs