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Frisbee School.

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I swear to god. I'm starting to feel like I don't even work at a ski school anymore. NOBODY wants to ski. It's like I work with a bunch of Ultimate Frisbee players that just happen to teach skiing.

Everyday before line ups, after line ups, at lunch, when we're waiting for a private, if we don't have work, I ask if anybody wants to take a run. The answer is no so ridiculously frequently it boggles my mind. I didn't think we worked here because of the awesome wages the resort pays us: I thought we worked at the mountain because we loved to play in the hills. Every time I ask if someone wants to ski, I get stuff like "my skis need wax" "i don't have the right gear" "I'm too tired" "the snow's not that great" "I want to take a long lunch" or some crap like that. Lunch time usually sees me running up the boot pack for a quick side country lap or at least bombing a couple groomers. After I'm done with a lesson I'm just burning to get some good turns in.

How is it that so many of my co workers have lost the passion that got them into the job in the first place?


And don't even get me started on the weekenders...
post #2 of 12
I think this is sad. Unfortunatley it is more prevalent then I think any of us would care to admit.

The real tragedy here is that if an "instructor" is not turned on and excited about skiing themselves how can they possibly turn their clients onto skiing?

I think...and this is just a total guess, as I dont know your resort....but often this problem is the result of a lack of leadership. This is likely abit of "MBA Speak"...but this is the difference between leadership and managment, your ski school might be well managed, and probably is....but seems to lack leadership.

Leaders inspire, push, and ultimatley harness that emotialnal power that we all possess. They set the bar high, and give their staff the desire to achieve it.

I am greatful for the inspirational leaders that I have the opportunity to work under...they kept raising the bar, and then ensured we put the work in to achieve it. I think cultures of mediocracy, that are prevelant in some ski schools, and indeed by many members on this site, fail not only the clients that come to these schools, but also their staff. Skiing, and the journey of developing as a skier can, and in many cases should be a life changing experience.
post #3 of 12
I believe that there is more to this issue than something leadership can fix. Burn out is a fact of life at ski school. Be thankful they are still showing up to work. It's not unusual to have over 30% staff turnover every season. It should not be surprising that signs of such impending turnover start showing at the end of the season. There are many possible reasons why free skiing slacks off at the end of the season. This year I had some health issues that cut back my personal free runs. And on the last day of the season, I decided to cut out a couple of hours early to get some golf in. You know, it is ok to have other interests besides skiing. Heck, it's a ski resort tradition to start getting silly as the season end nears (e.g. pond skimming, bike races, costume parties, etc.). Look at the positive side of this. The more pros that are hanging around the base area not free skiing, the less likely your personal free runs will get interrupted by work.
post #4 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilT View Post
I swear to god. I'm starting to feel like I don't even work at a ski school anymore. NOBODY wants to ski. It's like I work with a bunch of Ultimate Frisbee players that just happen to teach skiing.

Everyday before line ups, after line ups, at lunch, when we're waiting for a private, if we don't have work, I ask if anybody wants to take a run. The answer is no so ridiculously frequently it boggles my mind. I didn't think we worked here because of the awesome wages the resort pays us: I thought we worked at the mountain because we loved to play in the hills. Every time I ask if someone wants to ski, I get stuff like "my skis need wax" "i don't have the right gear" "I'm too tired" "the snow's not that great" "I want to take a long lunch" or some crap like that. Lunch time usually sees me running up the boot pack for a quick side country lap or at least bombing a couple groomers. After I'm done with a lesson I'm just burning to get some good turns in.

How is it that so many of my co workers have lost the passion that got them into the job in the first place?


And don't even get me started on the weekenders...
come work with me whereever I end up next season I wont turn ya down for turns....out in utah I normally can allways find someone to ski with I want sometime though I like skiing alone. In pa this wasnt the case hard to find people to ski with.
post #5 of 12
I'm a bit surprised. Go into the instructor room at Baker at 9:30 and it's dead. Everyone is up skiing.
post #6 of 12
The locker room was pretty empty Sunday morning at WP. Everyone was clinicing or sliding. And this was the morning after the end of the season SS party. Yes, it was an extremely successful event but all wanted to go play in the snow despite certain aches and pains. I rode at Copper on Friday and at WP on Sat. & Sun. The freshies are calling.
post #7 of 12
I rarely get a "no thanks" when I ask other instructors if they want to ski at my resort either. many show up very early to get skiing in before the 10am lineup, and those who don't get lessons get right on the lift.
post #8 of 12
Re-reading my original post on this....I should have also pointed out, good leaders also keep skiing FUN!

Who wouldn't want to have fun?

Maybe the OP's lunch room is way too swish?
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skidude72 View Post
I should have also pointed out, good leaders also keep skiing FUN!
Its skiing, therefore its FUN by default.
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max_501 View Post
Its skiing, therefore its FUN by default.
Well you would think so....but somtimes in ski schools people beat themselves up, get frustrated etc....and as Rusty pointed out this time of year, especially if you are full time, you just get really tired and sore....but I understood the OP to be saying this problem was prevelant all season...not just in the last few weeks....I think the bottom line is, if you are not having fun...you need to re-evaluate.
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Re-reading my original post on this....I should have also pointed out, good leaders also keep skiing FUN!

Who wouldn't want to have fun?
Why just the skiing? Why not have the whole Instructor/ Ski & Ride School experience fun.

You shoulda seen the dance floor Saturday night at the end of the season party.: Leadership from the top down. :
post #12 of 12
PhilT,

I usually have the opposite problem. I am busy enough with lessons that I have little time to ski. Once in a while I have 40 minutes to ski until the group lessons start and then it is teaching all day. I ski on my day off when I can.

RW
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