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Owner comparison: Mythics vs 8000

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
Skis: 178 MRs and 178 L8Ks, skier: 6ft, 180lb, advanced/expert

OK, so now I had enough time on my new 178 Mythics to get a good feel how they compare to my old trusted and much loved 8Ks (also 178). Boy, am I glad that got the MRs... For the 88mm ski, it is truly an amazing carver, I'd say it carves as well as my 8Ks (not surprising, as it is 21m vs 20m sidecut). 8Ks are lighter, but the MRs are still nimble enough to make the difference almost academic. My impression is that the substantial camber of the MRs helps to boost their energy on hardpack. The biggest difference though is off-trail. MRs feel much stiffer, burlier, and much, much more stable. I can now ski at speed where before I was doing cautious short turns. They eat crud quite happily, just stay on the tips and you should be fine. I am having a lot of fun on them and I don't feel that I lost any of the playfulness of the 8K. Few bump runs I took on the MRs felt very good. I have not had a chance to test them in truly soft deep snow, but my feeling is that they will do fine, but not stellar due to their stiffness. But for that I have a softer, longer, wider ski... Overall, this is probably as close to a "ski to rule it all" as anything I ever tried. Another home run for Dynastar Legend series. Now I would take the MRs out everytime and I would ski the 8Ks only if I intend to stay on groomed runs all day (with my kid ;-)

Bottom line: L8Ks will make you and expert skier, but experts will appreciate the MRs a lot more. I'd now rate the L8Ks as a mostly groomed runs ski and the MRs as the true all-mountain set of expert boards.


Alex
post #2 of 27
Thanks for the review -- I was thinking about getting a pair of the MRs or 8Ks. Do you have them mounted flat, or with the fluid system? How do you feel the 178cm length is for someone as tall as you?
post #3 of 27
Hi,

I skied both models this year and ended up buying the Mythic Riders last week, with the fluid system binding.

It was a hard descision but I decided to go with the skis I had the most fun on in the powder and cut up powder.

I may buy another ski for fast groomers.
post #4 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexzn View Post
Bottom line: L8Ks will make you and expert skier, but experts will appreciate the MRs a lot more. I'd now rate the L8Ks as a mostly groomed runs ski and the MRs as the true all-mountain set of expert boards.
That is hog wash. They are different skis for different skiers and different purposes. One ski is not more "expert" than the other and a ski does not "make" you an expert skier.

I have the predecessor to the 8800 which is identical. I know the Mythic Rider was changed a bit, especially in increasing the side cut. However, I find it hard to believe that it was that thoroughly over hauled as to make it ski differently than the 8800.

This review is very much incomplete without more details, specifically location and primary use of the skis. As an east coast tree hound, I own both and always use the 8000 except on powder days. I suspect if I lived out west, I probably wouldn't have much use for the 8000. Hardly means one is a "better" ski than the other, but two different tools for two different jobs/skiers.
post #5 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by riverc0il View Post
I know the Mythic Rider was changed a bit, especially in increasing the side cut. However, I find it hard to believe that it was that thoroughly over hauled as to make it ski differently than the 8800.

This review is very much incomplete without more details, specifically location and primary use of the skis. As an east coast tree hound, I own both and always use the 8000 except on powder days. I suspect if I lived out west, I probably wouldn't have much use for the 8000. Hardly means one is a "better" ski than the other, but two different tools for two different jobs/skiers.
I have two sets of 8k's (one flat, one fluid), a pair of 8800's (mounted flat) and a pair of MR's (mounted flat) (oh, and some Contact 11's for days that I get stuck on groomers). The difference between the 8800's and the MR's is VERY substantial. Flex a pair of 8800's then try the same with the MR's - night and day. While the shape is a little bit different, the flex pattern is completely revised (much stiffer), and it feels completely different.

I agree that the review isn't very useful or accurate, and also agree that on the Ice Coast, my first grab is for my 8k's, whereas, right now in Utah, where we just got 15 inches, the 8k's are staying in the bag, and the MR's are having playtime. Last week in Tahoe, it was essentially Ice Coast conditions, and the 8k's ended up coming out to play.

I lived with the 8k's for two years and never felt I was missing anything, and in fact in early March, before the MR's arrived, they came out to Utah instead of the 8800's as they float just fine, and are a lot more fun than the 8800's.

My older pair of 8k's have fixed bindings, whereas my latest ones have the "fluid" system. I haven't had the chance yet to try them back-to-back, but if I had to go on feeling, I'd say I prefer the fixed ones as they feel snappier. The benefit to the fluid is that I can put both them (without bindings) and the MR's into one bag easily for transport. If you're not going to be taking them places in bags, I'd go for the fixed, or flat set-up.

Agreed that depending on where I mainly used the skis would have a large bearing on my decision, but I have always had a ball on my 8k's, and if I HAD to make a decision which one I'd keep (so far this year 4 Ice Coast days and 40 West), it would probably be the 8k's as they're more versatile and quicker in a wider range of conditions. Statements regarding which ones are "expert" boards are nonsense, as they are both extremely capable but have very different feels.

AND, if you wanted a real set of Western all mountain boards, then leave the MR's home and take some Pro Riders out.
post #6 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofun3 View Post
The difference between the 8800's and the MR's is VERY substantial.
VERY!!

SJ
post #7 of 27
[quote=riverc0il;892839]. However, I find it hard to believe that it was that thoroughly over hauled as to make it ski differently than the 8800.

The MR was is more than thoroughly over hauled, it is a compleatly different ski, and skis all together differently than the 8800.

coup
post #8 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofun3 View Post
I agree that the review isn't very useful or accurate.
If you read Member Gear Reviews with any regularity, SJ has posted 1000s of lines of useful information regarding the MR & 8K. Here he pretty much sums up his overall impressions.

The 8K does make many, many skiers better, because it is a ski that allows them to access their skills in a varity of terrian and conditions without being punished.

coup
post #9 of 27
Thanks for the feedback on the 8800 vs. the MR. Glad to hear the ski was overhauled and skis differently. IMO, the 8800 did not have enough dynamic range but was far from the best at what it was useful for. I will see if I can get on a pair of MR's to check out the differences next season.
post #10 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofun3 View Post
I agree that the review isn't very useful or accurate, and also agree that on the Ice Coast, my first grab is for my 8k's, whereas, right now in Utah, where we just got 15 inches, the 8k's are staying in the bag, and the MR's are having playtime. Last week in Tahoe, it was essentially Ice Coast conditions, and the 8k's ended up coming out to play.
:

Going by the other info in this thread, I gather that the MR is stiffer than the 8k, yet you prefer them to the 8k when the snow is deeper. I would think that softer would be better in the deep snow. Is it that the 8k is just too soft for the speeds you get on big mountains, while the MR is stiffer but not too stiff for powder?:
post #11 of 27
I don't understand why anyone is comparing the MR and 8K. These skis weren't put out by Dynastar to compete with one another. While they have family similarities, they are different skis for different conditions and hills. Then somebody throws in the 88K, which shouldn't be compared to either the 8K or the MR.

I have all 3 skis and find each to be very enjoyable. I've enjoyed the 88K so much that I'm waiting for a pair of NOS in 178 (the orange ones) to appear on ebay. I recently got the MR when SJ had his blow out sale so I'm not yet as familiar with that ski.

Any of these skis are good for a skier who likes the Dynastar feel and skis in softer (Rocky Mountain) snow conditions.
post #12 of 27
I have a pair of the Orange 8800's in a 178 if you are interested. $200 + shipping. Look demo bindings. PM me if interested. Also have a pair of (06/07) 8000's in a 178 with bindings, like new. $320 + shipping. US only.
post #13 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
: Going by the other info in this thread, I gather that the MR is stiffer than the 8k, yet you prefer them to the 8k when the snow is deeper. I would think that softer would be better in the deep snow. Is it that the 8k is just too soft for the speeds you get on big mountains, while the MR is stiffer but not too stiff for powder?:
Repeat after me, W-I-D-E-R. I love my 8k's virtually everywhere, but when there's a 10 inch dump, that extra 10mm of waist (and a little more shovel) on the MR makes them come off the rack first.

The 8800 is also softer than the MR, but to me the flex is much more consistent on the MR, and I know where I'm at at all times versus the 8800 withn its much softer shovel caused (to me) to keep on readjusting my weight as the fronts hooked up in pow.
post #14 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofun3 View Post
W-I-D-E-R. I love my 8k's virtually everywhere, but when there's a 10 inch dump, that extra 10mm of waist
Thanks. It makes sense now.
post #15 of 27
Thread Starter 
Sorry, here is more information: Location: Tahoe. Primary use- freesking. As a weekender, I have to ski in whatever conditions I get. I much prefer to go off-trail, so I stay on the groomers only if the off-piste terrain is frozen. 8000 is still quite useful out West, I used it for three years quite happily and one of my best powder days was done on them. It is a great ski. The problem is that it is just much less stable than the MR in cruddy of choppy snow. Last two weekends I ended up skiing on the MRs for one day and then switching to the 8K the next day (both weekends were spring skiing conditions soft and heavy). Both time I wished I had the MRs. My take is that the extra stiffness and width of the MRs make a big difference in crud, yet at the same time the increased sidecut makes them almost as quick on the groomers as the 8Ks. 8K are more user-friendly with a large sweet spot, MR needs a more exact driver to be at its best. I stand by mey statement that the expert skier in the West would appreciate the MRs more. 8Ks are easier and more mellow, but don;t have quite as much of top end performance. I hope it is more helpful now.


Quote:
Originally Posted by riverc0il View Post
That is hog wash. They are different skis for different skiers and different purposes. One ski is not more "expert" than the other and a ski does not "make" you an expert skier.

I have the predecessor to the 8800 which is identical. I know the Mythic Rider was changed a bit, especially in increasing the side cut. However, I find it hard to believe that it was that thoroughly over hauled as to make it ski differently than the 8800.

This review is very much incomplete without more details, specifically location and primary use of the skis. As an east coast tree hound, I own both and always use the 8000 except on powder days. I suspect if I lived out west, I probably wouldn't have much use for the 8000. Hardly means one is a "better" ski than the other, but two different tools for two different jobs/skiers.
post #16 of 27
In my search for an Eastern powder ski (something better than my race carvers in soft/deep conditions), I tried both these skis, and they're very different animals.

The MR is the beefier of the two. Rock solid in every condition, no discernable speed limit It wouldn't be my first choice for hardpack, but holds its own quite well. Only downside is short turns - doable, but not without effort, a big drawback if most of your days are spent on small Eastern mountains.

No problem making short turns on the 8000. Did well on hardpack too, but had a very reachable speed limit (and I'm hardly the fastest guy on the hill). I'm told this was less an issue with earlier models. A much better choice for where I ski, but not the ski for me.

I didn't buy either of these skis, but if one of them miraculously appeared on my doorstep, it would certainly get its fair share of use.
post #17 of 27
Just a quick note, with more comparison of the MRs and 8000 after skiing today. I'm 6"2" 185 lbs. Skied yesterday at Crystal Mtn. WA. with variable conditions from slightly crusty crud in late morning to warm snow in the early afternoon and back to even crustier stuff in the shade and after cooling in late afternoon. Skied my own 8000s (178 cm, Fluid system) in the late morning through mid afternoon. Skied the MRs (178 cm, demo PX12 bindings) for the last hour of the day in primarily the shade where things were getting harder. I found the 8000s to be quite quick in turn initiation and held an edge better. They were great on the really steep and hardpack/crusty stuff (dare I say icy ) and were easy to prevent from skidding. I could easily maneuver them around moguls. They did get tossed around a bit by crud snow. I skied the MRs late in the day when things were getting hard again. Although the MRs were a bit slower in turn initiation, ie. I had to work harder to get them to come around in tight corners or bumps, and did not hold the edge nearly as well as the 8000s on hard crusty stuff, (the MRs skidded quite a bit) I almost preferred them. They seemed so much smoother even at speed on the groomers. Although I felt edge hold lacking a bit on the MRs, the overall transition into and through the turn felt so much more continuous. It felt more natural to me, though a bit slower, than the 8000s. The latter almost felt a bit grabby on the edge. The MRs also seemed to have a smoother flex pattern throughout the ski that worked well with my mix of old school and modern technique. Unlike many others on this forum, I think the MRs have a larger sweet spot than the 8000s. With the 8000s, I always seemed to be hunting for the proper fore-aft weighting to get a smooth turn.

BUT this may all be due to the tuning of the two skis.... See my post in the tuning section ("Ski edges too sharp and bases dry?"), so I will have to report back after today. On the other hand, the turn smoothness I found in the MR may also be due to the lack of the Fluid system on it.
post #18 of 27
Thread Starter 
Nick- I kind of echo your impression- I just find the MRs so much more stable than the 8Ks when things get tough. I now much prefer to be on the MRs, I can just go almost anywhere. If I am on my 8Ks I have to think what I am doing a lot more. Unlike you, I don't find the MRs all that slower in turning, but maybe I just skid them more. SierraJim says that MRs are some of the best crud busters in that width, and I fully vouch for that statement.

Alex

P.S Keep in mind that my 8Ks are the old 8Ks with 20m sidecut, not the current 19m sidecut.
post #19 of 27
I'll throw my 2 cents in here.

My fattest ski (until now) had been the mid-fat Head iM 78 Monster (actually 77 at the waist). This closing weekend at Stowe (GLORIOUS!), I used the Heads but also demoed the MR in the same length (165 cm for this inept old fart). The Heads worked but tended to be too carvy for that spring snow and were kinda grabby. In that heavy spring snow, the MRs were a BLAST! That plowed either through or over everything, were VERY stable at speed, actually made shorter quicker turns WAY better than I'd expected, and - I $h!t you not - they made bumps easier. That's just my own take, YMMV.

After burning out my legs for the weekend, I brought the demo skis back to the shop and bought a brand new pair (Fluid bindings). These are the fattest skis I've ever used, and I'm delighted.
post #20 of 27
Hey Alex,

An update,

Went back to Crystal to try the MRs (178) again side-by-side with my 8000s (178). Unfortunately, the MRs were out for demo already. So, I was "stuck" with my 8000s. To top it off - my age is beginning to show - I forgot my boots at home (they were plugged in to help dry them out). So I ended up getting some Head rental boots which were too wide in the heel and skied just the afternoon (3.5 hrs straight) . I detuned my 8000s just slightly using a soft gummy stone for the first 10 cm or so. The snow was crusty in the beginning and the skis bounced around alot but the detuning seemed to make the transitions in the turns a tad more smooth but it is hard to tell since I was in rental boots. I did hit some real steep sections that were very hard pack/crusty and the edges still hooked up quite well (better than the Mythics the day before) with minimal amount of bouncing/ chattering.

Although I was in rental boots, I did notice that the 8000s performed best when I kept a constant, but not too much, pressure on the fronts of the boots (minimal heel ball weight shifting). As the day progressed, AND we got more and more fresh snow (4-6 inches I think), I really started to get the hang of the 8000s. In fresh snow over crud, I was bombing down the mountain - loads of fun. It may have been the additional snow, but I also think it takes a while to get the hang of any skis. I would say that unless you spend a whole day on one pair of skis, it may be hard to really get a feel for what they can do. I think our bodies get accustomed to the characteristics of a pair of skis and we make unconscious adjustments.

Its kind of like what you currently say regarding the MRs and what you said initially in an early post (I am reprinting this just for reference and not an indictment ):

"(MRs) Surprisingly well-behaved on groomers with good edge hold, easy engagement, and even in bumps, although 8Ks are quicker in both conditions. Great ski in crud, really makes you feel more confident and makes nasty snow a lot easier........Compared with my 8Ks it felt just a tad more sluggish in very short turns, and the rebound energy was also dialed down somewhat."

As you have experienced, the more you ski on a pair, ie MRs, the more your body adjusts to them. You currently don't really feel much difference in turn initiation between them and your old 8000s.

One final note, the previous day that I tried the MRs with the Dynastar/Look PX12 demo binding, I did notice that even though the bindings toe position was set at the 341mm and lower notch rather than the next step up for my 342mm boot, my boot center mark was approximately 1cm forward of the ski centerline marked by Dynastar. (I guess the demo bindings default was mounted a bit forward). I wonder if that made the ski feel fairly quick in the turns and gave it that overall even flex feeling.

I wonder what the weight difference is between the Look/Dynastar PX12 demo bindings, its flat mount analogue, and the PX12 fluid mount? Any ideas (Maybe I should post that question as a new thread).

I'm going to try the Mythics this weekend again. If I like them I would consider buying the demo pair, but don't know if it is a good buy with the demo PX12 bindings on it rather than a clean/bare flat mount.
post #21 of 27
Thread Starter 
Nick-

I have never experimented with the mounting position, as both my Dynastars are mounted flat with P12 and PX12. 8Ks indeed need some forward pressure to keep the tips in check. When I demoed I thought that the MRs have a smaller sweet spot than 8Ks, not I think just the opposite (funny how you get used to the skis). Truthfully, the only area where MRs have a very distinct edge over 8Ks is crud and heavy chopped up snow. Everywhere else both skis shine. Since crud and chop are fairly common in Tahoe, getting the MRs over my aging 8Ks was probably a sensible choice for me. it seems that MR is a ski that people either love or stay indifferent to. Seems that you like them a lot. Before you buy the demos, check SierraJim's or dawgcatchng's stock, they may still have a new pair at a fair price.

Alex



Quote:
Originally Posted by BigNick View Post
Hey Alex,

An update,

Went back to Crystal to try the MRs (178) again side-by-side with my 8000s (178). Unfortunately, the MRs were out for demo already. So, I was "stuck" with my 8000s. To top it off - my age is beginning to show - I forgot my boots at home (they were plugged in to help dry them out). So I ended up getting some Head rental boots which were too wide in the heel and skied just the afternoon (3.5 hrs straight) . I detuned my 8000s just slightly using a soft gummy stone for the first 10 cm or so. The snow was crusty in the beginning and the skis bounced around alot but the detuning seemed to make the transitions in the turns a tad more smooth but it is hard to tell since I was in rental boots. I did hit some real steep sections that were very hard pack/crusty and the edges still hooked up quite well (better than the Mythics the day before) with minimal amount of bouncing/ chattering.

Although I was in rental boots, I did notice that the 8000s performed best when I kept a constant, but not too much, pressure on the fronts of the boots (minimal heel ball weight shifting). As the day progressed, AND we got more and more fresh snow (4-6 inches I think), I really started to get the hang of the 8000s. In fresh snow over crud, I was bombing down the mountain - loads of fun. It may have been the additional snow, but I also think it takes a while to get the hang of any skis. I would say that unless you spend a whole day on one pair of skis, it may be hard to really get a feel for what they can do. I think our bodies get accustomed to the characteristics of a pair of skis and we make unconscious adjustments.

Its kind of like what you currently say regarding the MRs and what you said initially in an early post (I am reprinting this just for reference and not an indictment ):

"(MRs) Surprisingly well-behaved on groomers with good edge hold, easy engagement, and even in bumps, although 8Ks are quicker in both conditions. Great ski in crud, really makes you feel more confident and makes nasty snow a lot easier........Compared with my 8Ks it felt just a tad more sluggish in very short turns, and the rebound energy was also dialed down somewhat."

As you have experienced, the more you ski on a pair, ie MRs, the more your body adjusts to them. You currently don't really feel much difference in turn initiation between them and your old 8000s.

One final note, the previous day that I tried the MRs with the Dynastar/Look PX12 demo binding, I did notice that even though the bindings toe position was set at the 341mm and lower notch rather than the next step up for my 342mm boot, my boot center mark was approximately 1cm forward of the ski centerline marked by Dynastar. (I guess the demo bindings default was mounted a bit forward). I wonder if that made the ski feel fairly quick in the turns and gave it that overall even flex feeling.

I wonder what the weight difference is between the Look/Dynastar PX12 demo bindings, its flat mount analogue, and the PX12 fluid mount? Any ideas (Maybe I should post that question as a new thread).

I'm going to try the Mythics this weekend again. If I like them I would consider buying the demo pair, but don't know if it is a good buy with the demo PX12 bindings on it rather than a clean/bare flat mount.
post #22 of 27

Continued/Updated Comparison MRs and 8K

Last Friday, I was out at Mt. Baker with a pair of the MRs (178 w/ demo PX12 bindings). Lots of fresh snow but I started late in the morning and much of it was already warmed, heavier, and cut-up. Amazing sounds emanating - loud squeaking during compression - from the snow while skiing or walking. Now, I know what people mean by "mashed potato" snow. It was a lot of work even with the MRs, but I thoroughly enjoyed myself even though I was toast before the end of the tday. I found that even as good as the MRs are in crud, I faired best on this kind of day by limiting the amount of forward pressure on my boots and keeping either a neutral stance or slightly back from center in terms of my weight. As long as I didn't let myself get too far in the back seat (ie use my stomach muscles to pull me forward when a bit too far in back), the skis did great.

I skied the MRs almost all day. At the end, I switched to my own 2008 8000s (178) with the Fluid PX12 system. WHOAAA!! Boy did they feel different!!! It wasn't that I couldn't ski them, it was just that they felt so much stiffer than the MRs - I know this may be contrary to what some have said about the MRs. The 8000s with the Fluid system felt very stiff under the boot. I had to be so careful not to catch an edge - even on the groomers. Its amazing how used to one ski a person can become (MRs) that another ski becomes temporarily unusable. While the 8000s were quicker for turn initiation, the MRs seemed to allow a wider flexibility in terms of turn shape. I started suspecting it was that the MRs seemingly softer flex was due to the absence of the Fluid System.

Later, I compared the two skis (both 178) side-by-side. The MRs appear to be just a tad shorter in overall length (but it might have been my eyes too). What is definitely not questionable is that the center mounting point of the MRs is about 1.5 cm or so more towards the front of ski if both tips are aligned. I don't know how they compare wrt contact points. Also, the MRs appear to have just a bit more camber. The real amazing difference between the two setups was that the MR with the demo PX12 binding had an overall softer longitudinal flex from the heel forward than the 8000s with the Fluid System, particularly under the boot. This was readily apparent to me as well as the tech at the shop. Granted, we evaluated this with the often maligned method of flexing the ski and we did not compare the torsional or lateral flex of the skis. Also, the 8000s seemed comparatively softer in the tail (maybe just relative to the middle) than the MRs. This seems consistent with what I experienced on the snow.

I know this isn't the same as comparing MRs with and without the Fluid system, but it may be something to consider. If I were to get the MRs and use them as an alternative to the 8000s, I would definitely lean towards a flat mount on the former.

(One final observation on the 8000s. When I skied them the previous week with some rental boots (softer flex I suspect), I noticed that I had to definitely stay on the front of the boots - but I had a real blast. This past weekend, when I was using the 8000s all day on Saturday with my own stiffer boots, they definitely tended to rail more, not much room for error, and I had to be more careful in being gentle with the up front pressure. The combination of boot and ski stiffness definitely makes a big difference in how the ski behaves).

Now, I'm just sorry that the season is over here in WA. Maybe I should start thinking about hiking with my skis up at Mt. Baker On the other hand, hmmmmm...... Snowbird in May??:
post #23 of 27
Thread Starter 

So, let me volunteer the conclusion

Both skis work great if you take a bit of time to adjust ;-) Interesting feedback on the Fluid system though...

Dynastar Legends are a terrific series of skis, I never heard anyone complaining about any of the skis in their lineup. The ski season is still going here at Tahoe, but it is pretty much not worth the trip from the Bay Area. I heard that palmer chair on Mt. Hood is open, so there is always that possibility.

Alex
post #24 of 27
I would be interested to know the results of the 8K , with / without the fluid system .
post #25 of 27
I've owned the 8K without fluid, Contact 11/now, uh, 10? with fluid. Never skied the MR. Can see how the fluid plate would seem to stiffen up things, believe it's not so much about longitudinal flex as transverse. The plate IMO allows maybe more front to back flex, but stiffens up the sides, gets your force to the edge more effectively, so there's a right-now grab that a traditional flat mount can't reproduce. Also the height will give you more efficiency in edging.
post #26 of 27
A lot of discussion on this forum has been devoted to the flat vs plate performance question and I'd bet at the end of the day the difference would be neglibible to all the most elite level skiers.

On the other hand, the Look Fluid system (unlike Marker) offers tremendous flexibility in changing not only the boot size, but experimenting with or changing your fore/aft position is a breeze and doesn't even require a tool. Very well engineered.
post #27 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Restoked View Post
I would be interested to know the results of the 8K , with / without the fluid system .
I have both, and the fluid system makes the ski more relaxed - not as zippy and instantly responding as the fixed point bindings.

I have the fluids as I can take both my MR's and 8k's in one ski bag, and put the bindings on my backpack on the plane.

If I had to take only one 8k, it would be the pair with the fixed bindings.
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