EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › It's now official; most skier deaths of any year in Colorado
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

It's now official; most skier deaths of any year in Colorado

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
post #2 of 11
Might be due to all the great snow......more skier days equals more wrecks unfortunately.
post #3 of 11
Any more details on that one?

Seems like most inbound fatalities were on blue runs this year.
post #4 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by uricmu View Post
Any more details on that one?

Seems like most inbound fatalities were on blue runs this year.
They always are.
post #5 of 11
Skiing is really amazingly safe.
I'm surprised there aren't more fatalities with all the hazards.
Especially with the kind of amazing lines that are being skied.
I hate seeing anybody hurt, but if you're gonna live, you gotta
participate in life giving activities.
I myself feel alive when I ski......like I'm sure everyone else does.
The weight of work, the worlds problems......they all disappear.
All you can do is do your best......
post #6 of 11
Some perspective: The long term average for Colorado is 14 skier deaths per year. This year's count of 17 does not represent a statistically significant departure from the norm, even if it is a record. Time will tell if this is a trend or a one-year anomaly.
post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt View Post
Some perspective: The long term average for Colorado is 14 skier deaths per year. This year's count of 17 does not represent a statistically significant departure from the norm, even if it is a record.
I are you certain. 17 v.14 seems significant - 20%. I wouldn't really know, however.
post #8 of 11
I don't have the stats, but I'm certain that deaths and injuries due to road-travel on the way to skiing, far outnumber what happens on the hill.

Last week, a single accident on I-70, east of Vail, involved 70 cars, 1 confirmed fatality, 3 critically injured and 22 in "fair" condition.

("fair" often means life-changing injuries - but you'll live).

Skier deaths are a tragedy. But, what happens on roads is carnage by comparison.
post #9 of 11
I found some more concrete data that has a data set form the early 80s compared to one from 01-02. If you add those in there in definately a statistically significant trend.

Last season 2006-2007 fatalities were down to 22 for the year, which for the last 10 years averaged 37 fatalities.

Facts About Skiing/Snowboarding Safety 9.1.2007


Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
The per visit rate was not down that much. Last season was a lot shorter than any of the others in the list in number of days. This year Colorado has now surpased it's record which was previously the 01-02 season, both in the shaped ski era. Nothing yet to support it in terms of documentation, but I think hooking an edge on a shaped ski can have more catastrophic consequences than hooking an edge on a shaped ski because the deeper shaped side cut causes one to change direction more dramatically while out of control than the straighter side cut does.

I did manage to finally find some data on skiing fatalities that includes both pre shaped ski years and post shaped ski years. The conclusion is:
"Results: A total of 274 skier deaths occurred between 1980 and 2001 in Colorado. Death rates ranged from 0.53 to 1.88 per million skier visits. The majority of deaths were among males (>81%). Ages ranged from 7 to 77 years with an average of 32 years. The greatest number of deaths associated with downhill skiing (76 deaths) occurred between 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. while the greatest number of deaths associated with cross-country skiing happened between 2:00 and 6:00 p.m. About 65% of deaths associated with downhill skiing (133 cases) died of traumatic injuries resulting from collisions." And that figure appears to have increased more between 02 and 08, the 06-07 wasn't as high but was a shorter season in number of days. This year it is back up to record levels again.

If you want the full text and tables it costs $31.50.

http://www.injuryjournal.com/article...055-X/abstract



Also though according the data the ski industry puts out voluntarily (Facts about Skiing/Snowboarding Safety link above), you are a lot more likely to die riding a bike, or even being struck by lightning (playing golf).

I think the moral of the story is:
1) Learn good hockey stop and skidding skills (both sides) even if you are using shaped skis.

And

2) Ski under control especially when skiing along the edge of trails close to immovable obstacles

3) Live every day like it is your last because anything can happen, it just might be.
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
I found some more concrete data that has a data set form the early 80s compared to one from 01-02. If you add those in there in definately a statistically significant trend.

Last season 2006-2007 fatalities were down to 22 for the year, which for the last 10 years averaged 37 fatalities.

Facts About Skiing/Snowboarding Safety 9.1.2007
Excellent article and it debunks some of the myths that abound, even on the Epic Ski forums. As to the question of whether it is a statistically significant difference to go to 17 from 14, my answer would be probably not. I don't have the figures for a number of years to analyze, but it is quite probable that there is a great deal of variability in the numbers (10, 16, 13, 18, 11, 17, 12, 15 as a sequence yields a mean of 14 for example with a degree of variance). The other issue is to be statistically significant the difference from the mean must be an event that would be significant at either the .05 or .01 level. That means that the result 17 (actually + or -3 since I think you are talking two tailed probability) would not happen by chance more than once in 20 years, or once in 100 years for the higher confidence level.

The other bit of information that would help to determine if this might be of real significance is the number of skier visits. If it has been a good year and there have been more skier visits, you would expect a higher number of fatalities.

Further, even if this is statistically significant, all that tells you is that something is probably causing the higher death rate. But even that is not certain, for statistical significance means that the result is not what we expected, it does not necessarily mean real significance. Sometimes flukes happen, the roulette wheel comes up red 17 times in a row, and some lucky schnook breaks the bank at Monte Carlo (but I'll keep betting on the casino).
post #11 of 11
One more than average, if there is such a thing, is significant. Skiing is a dangerous sport and as much as it is fun, abusing that fun by skiing dangerously or disreguarding the skiers code is a selfish act. And it starts when you leave your house or hotel for that car or suv race to the Resorts to get that sacred parking spot or to get virgin powder runs. Driving too fast on road conditions that are crowded and icy just for that untracked run is just as stupid as skiing too fast in crowded slopes.

Skier deaths are the wow factor in the newspapers and the websites. The final statistic that hits home. Think of this, ever wonder how many serious accidents happen that you don't hear or read about? The broken bones, the concussions, the broken necks and backs that paralize skiers? The constant flow of rescue vehicals from the base lodge or the patrol shack?

It's past time for many people to realize the dangers and risk out there on the slopes and ski within your capabilities and respect the rights of others whom you share the slopes with.

Safety should be before fun.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › It's now official; most skier deaths of any year in Colorado