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Yellowstone Club

post #1 of 35
Thread Starter 
Anyone know anything about Yellowstone Club? Thanks.
post #2 of 35
Yeah. I can't afford it.

What else would you like to know?
post #3 of 35
The Yellowstone Club is a private ski area abutting Big Sky to the west. To join the ski area you have to buy a lot there and the lots run into mega-bucks.

The Yellowstone Club has been a bad neighbor to the Big Sky area. The main developer is constantly being fined for damaging streams and wetlands but he continues to do what he wants since the fines are merely slaps on the wrist when you consider the amount of money he's dealing with.

The latest news from the Yellowstone Club is they are suing the US Government and Moonlight Basin trying to get ownership to the summit of Lone Mountain (the mountain most of Big Sky and all of Moonlight Basin are on). Moonlight Basin was awarded rights to the summit through a land swap by the forest district whose jurisdiction the summit fell in. The Yellowstone Club was trying to negotiate rights to the summit through a district that didn't control the summit. If Yellowstone got control of the summit they would be able to claim 4,000 feet of vertical drop for their ski area. The main developer thinks that would increase lot prices by almost $200,000 each.
post #4 of 35
wonder what ol' warren miller's take on this would be. (mr. miller is, if i'm not mistaken, a yellowstone club member.)
post #5 of 35
I think he is actually the director of skiing.
post #6 of 35
aaaaah...i see.

why do i think that entails a lot and home as well?
post #7 of 35
Yes, WM is a member and owns a home under constrcution. In addition, the new base lodge will be called the WM lodge.

Initial investment is 1M or more. Generally more, as the least expensive place there is 4M now. Some of the construction is being done on spec, and other by members. Annual dues of 16K are expected to go up to 25K in the near future.

Current members also include J. Kemp, G. LaMonde, D. Quayle.

The owner is also rumoured to be still trying to buy BS from Boyne.

The skiing includes groomer heaven all the way up to some steep and gnarly chutes.

Any more questions?
post #8 of 35
Yellowstone Club Just a little out of my price range. :
post #9 of 35
Quote:
The owner is also rumoured to be still trying to buy BS from Boyne.
There are all sorts of rumors and lawsuits happenings around Lone Mountain. I really doubt the Yellowstone Club has any interest in buying Big Sky from Boyne. I wouldn't be surprised if they would be negotiating the purchase of Boyne's access to the west side of Lone Mountain. If they do get ownership of the summit or some other chunk of land near the summit for a tram they still need to get right-of-way so their members can get down the mountain.
post #10 of 35
Go to the library and check the NY Times for Sunday Feb 22. There is an article in there about the Yellowstone Club.

Initial membership fee is $250,000. There are yearly dues of $16,000, but that is for the whole family. In order to even be considered, you have to have a net worth in excess of $3,000,000. Yes, Million.

On top of this, you must buy a lot. I'm sure they are very inexpensive. :

What a crime.
post #11 of 35
Thread Starter 
Thanks, everyone. Rio, is there anything not to like about the Bozeman area as a retirement location? Looks like heaven.
post #12 of 35
Quote:
Originally posted by Scalce:
I think he is actually the director of skiing.
Isn't he actually the developer of the whole thing? (Warren Miller)
post #13 of 35
No. The developer is Tim Blixeth, a lumber baron and developer billionaire from Oregon. He is also developing other properties in the Big Sky area.

The rumour regarding BS is from inside. (Really I was calling it a rumour just to minimize anyone complaining about it, but as I no longer have any dealings with YC, I guess i can just come out and say it.)

Big Sky has limited cultural/shopping/entertainment opportunities currently, but is growing. None of the members currently reside there full time - it is primarily a winter/summer destination, adn everyone goes back to Palm Springs in the fall and spring.

If you are interested in membership, it is on an invite basis, with approval from the Blixeths. Full disclosure of finances are required. A net worth of 3 million is also required, but frankly I don't see how you could swing it on 3m,

They are also putting in a golf course, if that is your bag.
post #14 of 35
And how this organization(order?) is working?
I mean, do they have their own ski patrol,
ski school/instructors? Just curious.
post #15 of 35
Ski patrol/ski school - yes and yes.
post #16 of 35
Can you live there year round?
post #17 of 35
Quote:
Originally posted by Bonni:

Initial membership fee is $250,000. There are yearly dues of $16,000, but that is for the whole family. In order to even be considered, you have to have a net worth in excess of $3,000,000. Yes, Million.

On top of this, you must buy a lot. I'm sure they are very inexpensive. :

What a crime.
Yes, what a terrible crime, we punish people for being successful. How dare they rise above the downtrodden masses.

God bless Warren, and all of those who've made a career in the skiing industry. Lord knows it's not easy.

F*** the Yellowstone club, I may never be a member, but I'll rip harder than most of them ever will, and have just as good a time doing it.

And I'll never knock them for being successful.

Don't be a hater!
post #18 of 35
Quote:
Originally posted by kcoleman:
Thanks, everyone. Rio, is there anything not to like about the Bozeman area as a retirement location? Looks like heaven.
Is heaven ice cold 24/7/365 with a bunch of cowboy bars, a decent not-for-profit ski area, and a sh!tload of college kids running around?

Just curious.
post #19 of 35
Also see http://www.montanaliving.com/article.phtml?article=100
and
http://www.wildutah.net/5-2-01/htmldocs/Powder.htm

Blixeth grew up poor, and decided at an early age that he would never go on welfare, and that he would pay cash for whatever he bought, including the Yellowstone Club.

If you go on their website, you can request a nice DVD showing the facility (and Warren Miller) and get an invitation to take a tour when you're in the area.

I for one will be a happy skier when I can afford to be a member. That's what America's all about [img]smile.gif[/img]

Dave
post #20 of 35
I have no qualms with the rich owning their own ski area. I do have qualms with them thinking being rich means they don't have to obey environmental laws and whenever they don't get their way they can file a lawsuit. If it wasn't for all the negative publicity they bring on themselves most of the people in this area wouldn't care one way or the other about the Yellowstone Club.

As for Yellowstone buying Big Sky, that doesn't make sense. Blixeth buying Big Sky is a different matter. There are plans to build a 'Jackson' style town near Big Sky which will lead to other big developments unrelated to Yellowstone. Owning Big Sky would fit into those plans.

kcoleman -

Bozeman is an acquired taste. If you're into outdoor activities like hiking, fishing, hunting, mountain biking, skiing, mountain climbing.... then this is a great area. The two major downsides are the cold winters and dirth of decent paying jobs.

Most of the retirees in this area are part-timers. They spend their summers here and winter in Florida or Arizona.
post #21 of 35
Yes, but how good is the skiing?

The trail map looks like a lot of beginner and intermediate skiing. Then there is a line of double black diamonds at the top. Judging from the map there is a lack of advanced (but not killer) runs.

It looks like a mediocre mountain to me.

Then again, if you want to fly me up there in a private jet- I'm available to check it out.
post #22 of 35
I should have said that it was Blixeth trying to buy Big Sky and not YC.

Most of the terrain now is green and blue. The wall at the top is primarily a playground for the patrollers. But only about 1/3 of the area is now developed. They have skiing on Andesite and Pioneer now, with a third hill planned (five more lifts). You are right, though, in between the intermediate and expert is lacking.

I wasn't terribly impressed, but then again, I'm not the kind of guy they are marketing to.
post #23 of 35
I haven't skied at Yellowstone but I get some great views of the terrain from the south side of Lone Mountain. It looks like it is mainly intermediate and advance terrain, but little expert terrain. There are some very steep areas but they require traversing and hiking to get to. I have never seen tracks in those areas.

The big advantage of Yellowstone is on powder days you could ski untracked powder all day. There are rarely any skiers on any of the runs. The employees are restricted from skiing untracked areas until a member has skied there. I've seen powder days where not a single track was laid on any of the runs at Yellowstone (what a waste).

The tram to the top of Lone Mountain changed the character of Big Sky. It added an immense amount of steep terrain accessible via lift. If Moonlight gets their lift to the top of Lone Mountain in it will change that resort from mediocre to top-notch overnight. That is why Yellowstone is so antsy to get a lift to the top of Lone Mountain, also.
post #24 of 35
Just checked their website. Gotta go, I'm off to buy a lottery ticket
post #25 of 35
Quote:
Originally posted by mrw:
Just checked their website. Gotta go, I'm off to buy a lottery ticket
If you win will you fly us all out there to help you check the place out?
post #26 of 35
If you look at it from an outside perspective, The Yellowstone Club, appears to working in an area that will benefit all of us snow sports enthusiasts. ...It is an overwhelming proposition to open a public ski area, and has been proven time and again that it is likely to prove unprofitable also. These guys have taken the intitiative to open a 'private' ski area and managed to do so while everyone in the industry was crying about the impossible obstacles to opening one. With very few exceptions, they are doing something others find impossible to do and prospering. -- It would be blatant jealousy to slander them for the success they and their clientele have had and they should be applauded for their service to the sport and the level of respect an establishment at this level brings to Montana skiing.

I don't think I would ever want to be a part of something so 'exclusive', but I do hope the idea catches on in ways that helps preserve skiing acreage and access to our mountain recreation areas. ..So what if it is some mega rich person's pocket change they are playing with; ..If it improves skiing in any way, the sport needs it.

Could it be that a modified concept of this nature would work for a group like Epicski?
post #27 of 35
Yellowstone Club & Moonlight Basin have managed to create resorts overnight out of nowhere for two main reasons. First, they are developing on private land so they don't need to go through an approval process with the US Forest Service, BLM or any state forest agencies. Second, the money for both comes from the real estate, not the ski area itself. Both areas lose money but the developers more than make up for the losses from the huge profits from ski in/ski out property sales.
post #28 of 35
Hmm... I wonder what the cost of a day of skiing
at the Yellowstone Club is...
post #29 of 35
Quote:
Originally posted by John J:
Hmm... I wonder what the cost of a day of skiing
at the Yellowstone Club is...
If you're thinking day ticket, keep shuffling down the road. Not a member or guest, your option is to pass yourself off as a potential buyer.

If you dividing the cost of annual owenership by the number of days you would get to ski, well, keep shuffling down the road. If you have to ask, you can't afford it.
post #30 of 35
Actually, I was thinking 4mil house+ 250,000 fee+ let us say 10years dues (16,000 a year currently) divided by a 4 person family skiing 120 days each year ( Yeah.)
About $900 a day per person.
Oops! Forgot about the equipment.
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