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Have you tweeked the forward flex of your boots?

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
Basicly it is like this: if you are serious about your skiing you buy a good boot and spend some major dollars on boot fitting. This is what you should do offcourse but how do you know that you are skiing with the right forward flex and getting the most out of your expensive high end boots? And how do you know you are not set up too forward or too up right or too stiff or too soft?

I would like to get some input from you guys regarding forward flex tweeking. For example if you want to ski fast on hard surface or on a racing course you need to have a stiff boot not to overflex your extended outside stance leg at apex while it still needs to be soft enough to allow some ancle flex on the flexed inside leg for proper pull back. Any thaughts?
post #2 of 29
go to a fitter that offers on-snow analysis.
post #3 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by epl View Post
go to a fitter that offers on-snow analysis.
Thats good advice but Im sure we can get some valuable input here by our members.
post #4 of 29
TDK, I think this is a good topic. I got new boots the end of last season and I'm just done (I think) with playing with the set up. On my boot I have the options to control lateral cuff cant, forward lean, and stiffness (through removal of cuff bolts). I am skiing a Tecnica Diablo Race Pro 110 and I'm 5'8" (175 cm) - 150 lbs. (23 kg).

Without tearing apart the boot you can only control forward lean on my boots by putting in or taking out the removable spoiler. Initially I thought it was a no brainer. Don't use the spoiler in order to achieve a more upright stance. Eventually, though, I tried using them on a trip a couple of months ago and they made a noticeably difference in allowing me to ski more centered (moving forward in my case). I haven't taken them out again since.

In terms of stiffness, initially I had removed the upper bolt on the back of the cuff but a couple days prior to adding the spoiler I removed the second. I'm not a big guy and with my strong preference for off piste I found the softening of the forward flex to be an improvement. I also like to work in the bumps and the softening helped there as well. On the groomed I didn't feel like I was giving up much of anything although I could see that I would probably prefer increased stiffness on big fast GS turns.

As a side note I would comment that I find the Race Pro to be a pretty exceptional boot in the smoothness and continuity of its forward flex. In some of my previous boots I think softening them in flex would have let to a very loose flex leading to an almost abrupt stop. With those boots I wouldn't want to decrease the forward flex stiffness.

My intuition tells me that the fact that increased forward flex seemed to work well for me has a lot to do with body geometry. With my relatively short legs, however, I find it to be advantageous.
post #5 of 29
NO. I pretty much knew what forward flex I wanted when I bought my boots, and just bought boots that had that flex. Finding boots with a given flex has never been a problem for me. Making boots fit my feet on the other hand has always been a problem.
post #6 of 29
Thread Starter 
Si and Ghost - great input, just what I was looking for. Si, the Technica Diabolo Race Pro 130 seems to be a pritty versatile boot. My Nordica Doberman Pro 130 has no adjustable canting or forward flex options. There is only the aft spoiler to play with. In 2003 I bought a pair of Nordica The Beast boots that had lots of bells and whistles including a shin spoiler that stiffened the boot up considerably but the Dobies are far more responsive and exact. Since I have allways been told I drop my butt too far down and back and ski with my outside leg not properly extended I took the rear spoiler out a few weeks ago and was able to buckle up two notches for a more upright stand. Did not feel I was too far in the back seat other than a couple of times on the race track (only place it really matters) but my times did not imporve. I also seemed to have some problems with getting my inside ski pull back and compared it with a girl FIS racer thats on Technica boots and she has them much more forward tilted than what I have and she has lot more forward lean in her legs and complete body and especially her inside foot is much more active and with more ancle flex. She is also much quicker than I am. I know, its not all about the boots, just curious to what kind of experimenting and conclusions you guys have been up to yourselves. Si, seems we have been dooing pritty much the same things. Im now back to skiing with the spoiler in the back but it doesent feel as athletic as a more upright stance although thats the way I have been skiing for two years now and before that with same kind of forward tilt in my Beasts. Its easier to flex that ancle on my inside leg and apply pressure more to the center of the ski but thats about the only clear upside. An other option would be to take the spoiler out but not buckle the top buckles up real hard for a more soft flex.

Some options:
1. forward tilt / stiff buckled
2. forward tilt / soft buckled
3. upright tilt / stiff buckled
4. upright tilt / soft buckled

Ghost, funny that you buy boots according to felx index. I have tried on a lot of different boots but the Dobies fit me hands down the best of all the lower end racing boots I tried. I tried Atomic, Technica and Salomon. Usually bootfitters reccomend you to choose a boot that fits allmost out of the box leaving the shell mods to an absolute minimum. I should actually be skiing with Head since we have a contract with them at our ski school but I need to buy without fitting and that is a bit risky. Any clue anybody if any low end Head racing boots would fit me? The Dobies fit me pritty much out of the box, some minor changes had to be made. My size is mondo29/335sole length.

Anyway, two differnt approaches by Si and Ghost. Great, hope to get some more input.
post #7 of 29
I don't buy boots too often . I have found that there are many different shaped boots in each flex range. So, while I do rule out boots that have the wrong flex, I still shop for fit.

The last time I bought boots I wanted something with a lighter flex (in the neighbourhood of 100 -120), specifically because I was intending to ski slower, in softer snow, in bumbs and wanted to be able to flex my ankles more when not going at warp nine.

For my previous purchase I was all about skiing as fast as humanly possible and wanted absolute control, being absolutely fed up with the response I was getting from the boots I was renting (which were still better than the ancient leather-fibreglass Raichles that were mine. I had bought them second hand, and being a starving student I had to spend more than a few years renting before I could justify the expense of new boots). I just wanted instant response and as much force transmitted as possible. I settled on a two-sizes-too-small Koflach Comp 911, with all sorts of bells and whistles that were set up for me and then rendered permanently unadjustable because of the ultra-hard custom foamed liner. These boots were too stiff for most of the skiing I did, but just right for the skiing I really cared about, and for the situations where my life depended upon their proper performance. Yes I was a bit reckless in my younger days, not like now.
post #8 of 29
Our boot fitter aside from making footbeds and doing all the basic fit work (all 3 of us are skiing in plug boots) also does an extensive balance analysis both fore/aft and lateral alignment.

He also has you bring skis in to take any binding ramp angle into account in the fore/aft process.

As far as forward flex goes, I think that is a personal choice that can only be assessed by the skier himself through on snow experience. Temperture has such an extreme effect on forward flex that it is impossible to assess in a shop or on the hill except through multiple on snow sessions at different temps. Although forward flex can fairly easily be adjusted "on the fly" through top buckle tighness and in my case the use and adjustability of a Booster Strap rather then a fixed non flexible power strap, I find this to be a moving target, different flex needed for different snow conditions grooming condtions, and temperature and somewhat to my mood for the day.

tdk6, how another racer has their boots setup has absolutly no correlation whatsoever with what you should be doing.

Indiviudual physiology including but not limited to, leg and calf circumference & calf muscle height, tibia length, height and weight distribution hip width, binding ramp angle, range of ankle flexion/dorsiflexion, strength, pronation and supination, skier technique and ski style all are a part of the "equation" and are very different for every skier.
post #9 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
I don't buy boots too often . I have found that there are many different shaped boots in each flex range. So, while I do rule out boots that have the wrong flex, I still shop for fit.

The last time I bought boots I wanted something with a lighter flex (in the neighbourhood of 100 -120), specifically because I was intending to ski slower, in softer snow, in bumbs and wanted to be able to flex my ankles more when not going at warp nine.

For my previous purchase I was all about skiing as fast as humanly possible and wanted absolute control, being absolutely fed up with the response I was getting from the boots I was renting (which were still better than the ancient leather-fibreglass Raichles that were mine. I had bought them second hand, and being a starving student I had to spend more than a few years renting before I could justify the expense of new boots). I just wanted instant response and as much force transmitted as possible. I settled on a two-sizes-too-small Koflach Comp 911, with all sorts of bells and whistles that were set up for me and then rendered permanently unadjustable because of the ultra-hard custom foamed liner. These boots were too stiff for most of the skiing I did, but just right for the skiing I really cared about, and for the situations where my life depended upon their proper performance. Yes I was a bit reckless in my younger days, not like now.
Whas that Comp 911 a red boot in the mid 80's with a foam linear?
post #10 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
Our bott fitter aside from making footbeds and doing all the basic fit work (all 3 of us are skiing in plug boots) also does and extensive balance analyisis both fore/aft and lateral alignment.

He alos has you bring skis in to take any binding ramp angle into account in the fore/aft process.

As far as forward flex goes, I think that is a personal choice that can only be assessed by the skier himself through on snow experience. Temperture has such an extreme effect on forward flex that it is impossible to assess in a shop or on the hill except through multiple on snow sessions at different temps. Although forward flex can fairly easily be adjusted 'on the fly' through top buckle tighness and in my case the use and adjustability of a Booster Strap rather then a fixed non flexible power strap, I find this to be a moving target, different flex needed for different snow conditions grooming condtions, and temperature and somewhat to my mood for the day.

tdk6, how another racer has their boots setup has absolutly no correlation whatsoever with what you should be doing.

Indiviudual physiology including but not limited to, leg and calf circumference & calf muscle height, tibia length, height and weight distribution hip width, binding ramp angle, ankle flexion and dorsiflexion, strength, pronation and supination, skier technique and ski style all are a part of the "equation" and are very different for every skier.
I knew there was more to it than just fit and forward flex . Great input Atomicman. I know that I cannot compare myself to a 15y old girl but Im merely just trying to get the discussion going and have some examples of other skiers that are set up completely different. Especially when they are much faster I usually try to figure out if that has anything to do with the gear they are using and in particular how they set it up and how they tune their skis and cant their boots. I know I improved my speed by about 0,5% in SL this year much due to proper gear tuning. Since I started to see what kind of improvements are possible this way Im on the lookout for more information. I met our local WC skier the other day on the slopes but there were too many people arround to talk tech with him (talked guitar tech with Steve Morse one with the whole press and a 1000 autograph hunters looking for tar and feathers nice guy BTW) but it would be more than fun to hear what he has to say about his skis and setups. Anyway, isnt there any way this boot fitter of yours could give some advice by looking at a video? BTW, still on Heads next year or is it going to be Fischer?
post #11 of 29
Some time in the '80s

post #12 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
Some time in the '80s

Hey, I knew there was something familiar about those boots, I had the slightly lower level boot that had the traditional Koflach racing colours of gray and black. Maybe the model was 711 I dont remember. They were the exact same boot without the flex gadges at the back. That boot was one stiff mama and I swapped it for a more upright Dynafit F3 Comformable foam linear in 1989 which I used all the way up to 2003! Heck, Im still on the same custom footbeads.
post #13 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
I knew there was more to it than just fit and forward flex . Great input Atomicman. I know that I cannot compare myself to a 15y old girl but Im merely just trying to get the discussion going and have some examples of other skiers that are set up completely different. Especially when they are much faster I usually try to figure out if that has anything to do with the gear they are using and in particular how they set it up and how they tune their skis and cant their boots. I know I improved my speed by about 0,5% in SL this year much due to proper gear tuning. Since I started to see what kind of improvements are possible this way Im on the lookout for more information. I met our local WC skier the other day on the slopes but there were too many people arround to talk tech with him (talked guitar tech with Steve Morse one with the whole press and a 1000 autograph hunters looking for tar and feathers nice guy BTW) but it would be more than fun to hear what he has to say about his skis and setups. Anyway, isnt there any way this boot fitter of yours could give some advice by looking at a video? BTW, still on Heads next year or is it going to be Fischer?
Nope, stickin' to Heads. the Supershape Speed has become my favorite groomer ski!
post #14 of 29

What he said...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
NO. I pretty much knew what forward flex I wanted when I bought my boots, and just bought boots that had that flex. Finding boots with a given flex has never been a problem for me. Making boots fit my feet on the other hand has always been a problem.
...I figured out about two seasons ago that a 130 flex, race fit boot works for me, all 4 masters events, and all-mountain skiing, too. I chose an Atomic RaceTech CS 130 because I liked where I was standing on the ski...not a lot of tweaking to be done to get me balanced fore and aft. I set up my cuff canting and played with it a little, and that seemed to be fine. I have not, per what Atomicman says, gone through an extensive analysis of my stance, and so forth...I just believe I've been doing it long enough that I can pretty much tell when my stance is right and when it's not. I try to pick a boot that requires as little tweaking as possible. Re forward flex in this boot, I just buckle real lightly most of the time...and use a WC Power Strap. Power Straps really do the job, for me, in terms of making a consistent, progressive florward flex...
post #15 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
the Technica Diabolo Race Pro 130 seems to be a pritty versatile boot. My Nordica Doberman Pro 130 has no adjustable canting or forward flex options. There is only the aft spoiler to play with. In 2003 I bought a pair of Nordica The Beast boots that had lots of bells and whistles including a shin spoiler that stiffened the boot up considerably but the Dobies are far more responsive and exact. Since I have allways been told I drop my butt too far down and back and ski with my outside leg not properly extended I took the rear spoiler out a few weeks ago and was able to buckle up two notches for a more upright stand. Did not feel I was too far in the back seat other than a couple of times on the race track (only place it really matters) but my times did not imporve. I also seemed to have some problems with getting my inside ski pull back and compared it with a girl FIS racer thats on Technica boots and she has them much more forward tilted than what I have and she has lot more forward lean in her legs and complete body and especially her inside foot is much more active and with more ancle flex. She is also much quicker than I am. I know, its not all about the boots, just curious to what kind of experimenting and conclusions you guys have been up to yourselves.
I am surprised to hear that your Pro 130's do not have the bolts or cuff canting option. My Hot Rods have two bolts in the spine, cuff canting on both sides and a removable velcro spoiler. I have never seen a 130 w/o bolts. At 130 flex they should come with the bolts.
Anyway, i think that you may have some balance problems. It seems that you are not trully balanced over your skis and cannot ski your best. You would have to see a competent bootfitter or someone who can look at your skiing and tell you what you have to modify.
I modified my boots extensively: the forward lean, stiffness, cuff canting, flex, boot and binding ramp angle. I also replaced liners, buckles and straps. Bottom line is: they are interrelated. They must work in harmony.

You have to find someone who can identify your problem(s) and tell you what you have to modify (technique/equipment).
post #16 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sywsyw View Post
I am surprised to hear that your Pro 130's do not have the bolts or cuff canting option. My Hot Rods have two bolts in the spine, cuff canting on both sides and a removable velcro spoiler. I have never seen a 130 w/o bolts. At 130 flex they should come with the bolts.
Anyway, i think that you may have some balance problems. It seems that you are not trully balanced over your skis and cannot ski your best. You would have to see a competent bootfitter or someone who can look at your skiing and tell you what you have to modify.
I modified my boots extensively: the forward lean, stiffness, cuff canting, flex, boot and binding ramp angle. I also replaced liners, buckles and straps. Bottom line is: they are interrelated. They must work in harmony.

You have to find someone who can identify your problem(s) and tell you what you have to modify (technique/equipment).
Thanks for posting sywsyw. No canting options on the Dobies and on the back there are two bolts, dont know what they do. Thats the difference between the Dobie Pro 130s and the Hot Rods, no bells and whistles. Should be the same boot otherwise.

BTW, please list all your modifications, why you did them and how it changed your skiing. That is what this thread is all about. Thanks in advance.
post #17 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
Thanks for posting sywsyw. No canting options on the Dobies and on the back there are two bolts, dont know what they do. Thats the difference between the Dobie Pro 130s and the Hot Rods, no bells and whistles. Should be the same boot otherwise.

BTW, please list all your modifications, why you did them and how it changed your skiing. That is what this thread is all about. Thanks in advance.
I believe the bolts on the back adjust the foward flex
post #18 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
I believe the bolts on the back adjust the foward flex
Unscrew one of the two bolt at the back for better flex?

BTW, what boots are you in at the moment? Head Raptors?
post #19 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
Thanks for posting sywsyw. No canting options on the Dobies and on the back there are two bolts, dont know what they do. Thats the difference between the Dobie Pro 130s and the Hot Rods, no bells and whistles. Should be the same boot otherwise.

BTW, please list all your modifications, why you did them and how it changed your skiing. That is what this thread is all about. Thanks in advance.

I find it hard to believe that your Dobies have no cuff cant options. My Hot Rods have dual cuff cant, one for each side. It would be a good idea to post some pics of your boot or maybe look at some pics of the Dobie Pro 130.
The difference between the Hot Rod and the Pro 130 is that the former is softer flexing (115 v. 130 flex index), has different color and a shock absorbing bootboard.

I modified quite a few things on my boot. I did it because i wanted to see if the modifications could make a difference. They did.
I played with/modified/changed:
- the rear spoiler
- the bolts in the back
- cuff
- liner
- buckles and catches
- lower shell
- boot board ramp angle
- binding ramp angle

The rear spoiler gives you more forward lean. You already know that. If you remove the rear spoiler, the cuff will be roomier and that can affect the fit of the cuff, especially if you have a skinny lower leg.

The two bolts in the back control forward flex. Removing them softens the flex. The difference is visible. I found that removing only one bolt does not make a difference in flex. You have to remove both to notice the difference. I also bolted the cuff to the shell on two of my boots.

I changed and repositioned the buckles and catches because i needed the cuff to fit my skinny lower leg tighter. That could be necessary if you remove the rear spoiler and have a skinny lower leg. I also changed and repositioned the lower buckles for a better fit of my foot.

I changed the stock cuff of my Icons with the XT's cuff for better fit of my lower leg, flex and performance on snow.

I replaced the Icon's stock liner with the XT's liner for better fit, flex and performance. Yes, the liner can influence the flex quality and stiffness of the boot.

I modified the lower shell of my boots. Your boots should have a dotted line inside the lowers for cutting. You can cut the lowers to soften the flex of the boots. You should consider this option if the flex is not good for you after removing the bolts from the back. With this modification, the design of the lower shell will be closer to a hinge (where the lower shell ends above the ankle bones). This will allow the boot to mimic the movement of the ankle and you will have more ankle subtlety. This will also make the boot more forgiving than a boot cut higher above the ankle bones.

The boot board ramp angle, the binding ramp and forward lean are interrelated.
I modified the boot board ramp angle by lowering the heel. That way, the ramp will be flatter. Keep in mind that modifying the boot board affects the forward lean and you may have to modify it too.
I modified the binding ramp angle by adding lifters to the toe piece until the difference in height between the heel and toe is zero. I went further and put one more lifter under the toe to make it a negative ramp but that was just for testing.
I modified the forward lean by adding or removing the rear spolier. The spoiler of your Dobies is credited with 2 degrees of lean.
The binding ramp adds to the boot ramp and that could create problems. The easiest way to reduce the ramp is to shim the toe of the binding until the difference between the toe and heel is zero. Then you can test the new setup. If you feel that you still need less ramp you can lower the boot board but that will inflence the fit because your foot will be lower in the boot. You can also shim the boot toe and heel lugs but you will need to see a boot fitter to make the toe and heel lugs DIN standard.

I found that if the boot holds the foot, the most important thing is to be balanced on the skis.
post #20 of 29
Shimming under the toes of the boot and dropping the boot board have much different effects. Beware!

for one thing, the forward flex of the boot is INCREASES when you drop the boot board -- your ankle is more closed. So unless you have tons of dorsiflexion, DON'T DO THIS.

I did it for fit reasons, and am going to undo it -- I've felt somewhat imbalanced ever since.

As I understand it, shimming under the toes of the boot brings your CM forwards, as you are more upright. Dropping the heel inside the boot can move it rearwards, as the angle of the tibia to the ski is decreased, effectively increasing fwd lean.
post #21 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by sywsyw View Post
I am surprised to hear that your Pro 130's do not have the bolts or cuff canting option.
The Dobermann is designed to be professionally fitted and has very limited end user adjustability. If cuff canting is required, the fitter must modify the boot. True canting by grinding the soles is one option.

The Dobie does have the bolts between the cuff and the lower. Removing them may "soften" the boot, but the resulting flex pattern may be nonlinear. You may like it, or you may not.
post #22 of 29
I currently ski in the Lange World Cup 150 plug. I have two pair. One pair, the older dark blue RL-11, I have modified to soften the flex so I can race Super G and DH in them. The newer powder blue ones I have only modified the boot board and toe and heel lugs (I kept the stiffer flex). I have done exactly the same things that sywsyw has done to his Tecnicas, to include cutting the lower shell as shown in one of his pics he posted. I too, found that just removing one rear screw did nothing, and after consulting John Minihan, the western race rep for Lange/Dynastar, that was his recommendation. I also lowered the boot board, more accurately called the zeppa, the same amount for the same reasons. I also adjust the ramp angle on all my bindings to a zero ramp or two degrees negative (higher toe then heel) angle for more forward initial ski shovel pressure. GS/SL two degrees and my Super G/DH's zero degrees. In addition, I have some canting issues that I resolve with toe and heel stacks ground to the correct cant and then the toe and heel lugs are ground to put them back to DIN standards. Lastly, I have replaced the top boot straps with Booster straps which give me more definitive closure on my upper cuffs. All of these changes/mods are described in an excellent Ski Racing article published several years ago, in which, Thor Verdonk, the Rossi boot guru, discusses how he sets up Lindsey Vonn's shells. He must be doing something right. The last, and in my case, the best adaptation I did (this was before Lange came out with a lace up race liner), was I replaced the stock liner with a Nordica lace up liner. All of these mods need to be done one at a time, then tested, then continued. In obvious certain instances, where the mod is permanent be very sure the change will be right for you. My creedo was modify first those things you can undo, then work on the permanent changes. I highly recommend the pics that were posted by sywsyw. A pic is worth a thousand words.
post #23 of 29
Shimming under the toe of the binding/boot will get the skier out from the backseat.
Dropping the zeppa will reduce the ramp angle. Yes, the forward lean will increase and the ankle will be more flexed but we can remove the rear spoiler.

I agree that sole canting should be done by a boot fitter. However, there is something the consumer can do. The Dobies/HR have a cuff cant feature on both sides of the boot. It has 3 positions. +, 0 and -.
0 = neutral, the default setting
+ = cuffs are pushed out more, giving the skier more edge hold
- = cuffs are pushed out less than the default setting
It is very easy to play with these settings. I did that on snow with the Diablos which have the same feature. The difference between the settings was visible. The default position worked best for me. His boots should have this feature. If tdk6 finds that one of the other positions is better for him, it will improve his skiing.

Regarding the bolts, removing them is necessay for someone who needs a softer boot. I have not found a difference in performance between the boot w/ and w/o the bolts. I do not ski at high speeds. Maybe at high speed the difference would be visible but at low speeds it is not, at least for me.

I agree with rmmaster, the mods need to be done one at a time, then tested. I, too, would start with the mods you can undo, like the cuff cant, bolts, rear spoiler or binding toe lifts and they can be done on snow.

For me, the problem was that i was not extending fully to unweight my skis completely. I was not balanced very well on my skis, thus that problem. Now i am balanced on my skis and can unweight my skis completely which results in effective weight transfer to the outside ski, the ability to move forward into the turn and pivot.
post #24 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
Basicly it is like this: if you are serious about your skiing you buy a good boot and spend some major dollars on boot fitting. This is what you should do offcourse but how do you know that you are skiing with the right forward flex and getting the most out of your expensive high end boots? And how do you know you are not set up too forward or too up right or too stiff or too soft?

I would like to get some input from you guys regarding forward flex tweeking. For example if you want to ski fast on hard surface or on a racing course you need to have a stiff boot not to overflex your extended outside stance leg at apex while it still needs to be soft enough to allow some ancle flex on the flexed inside leg for proper pull back. Any thaughts?
Try to get your heel up, put a shim under your heel between shell and innerboot, aprox 3mm.
It seams that one of your issues is that your but is getting to close to the snow :-) and what you want is to get it up and at the same time your knees closer to the snow, a close foot angel will let you keep your upper body high and still get a lot of pressure on the top of the skies in the start of the turn.
post #25 of 29
If you get a boot with too-soft flex for your style of skiing, you may overflex, or max out, the boot. How do you know if you are overflexing the boots? Is there a specific feeling you get, or a pain, or a dysfunctional thing happening with the skis?
post #26 of 29
When the temps are warm (35+) I crush my dobie 130s to the point where I fall forward and dorsiflex too much. Next season I may have to jump to the 150s.
post #27 of 29
So when the boots are too soft it feels like you get too far forward unexpectedly fast, and the boots are not offering the resistance and support you are used to?

Is there any pain or discomfort associated with this in the foot or ankle? Or is it just a problem with maintaining a functional forward balance over the ski?
post #28 of 29
LF,

In the extreme case, there is pain across the front of the ankle, as it closes and won't close further.

When you need to move quite far forwards to pressure the shovels, then the boots are just too soft. The notion is that since the boot offers very little resistance to forward flexion, the initial boot flexion will have no real effect on the ski.

This can be a good thing for many skiers, as their fore/aft balance errors will not be telegraphed to the ski.

But this softness is not for those that want their fore/aft movements to have an immediate effect.
post #29 of 29
Thanks, BigE. Interesting conversation. There's always so much more to learn.
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