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De-Funking Boots

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
My season is over, and the thought of storing away my somewhat stinky boots to grow fungus over the next six months troubles me a bit.

Does anyone have a good technique for cleaning/disinfecting boot liners?
post #2 of 22
How bad are they?

Mine smelled all fresh and clean, until I went away for a weekend and forgot about my (damp) boots in the car for a week.:

For me, all it took was some spray on disinfectant, like they use for bowling shoes. I get the non-scented, they scented one turned my old liners purple. Remove the liners from the boots, then spray all around, in and out. Let dry in the sun. A little Febreeze afterwards and good as new.

If they are real bad, or you just want some laughs, check here: Help needed - cat's pee'd in ma boots :-(
post #3 of 22
A can of Odor Eaters spray you can get at Wal-Mart works great.
post #4 of 22
Pull liners out throw them in the washing machine with some clothes or rags to increase turbidity. Once done shove a fabric softener sheet in them and insert your boot dryers (not the clothing dryer). When dry store liners in boots and throw a fabric softener sheet in...you will have the most wonderful smelling boots on the mountain.

If you have no boot dryer, hang them near your boiler, the dry warm air will help.

If you have leather liners....well then I dont know.
post #5 of 22
Has anyone tried an ozone generator? They work great for smoke damage and other smells. Seems like placing boots, liners, etc in a closed space (do your car at the same time ) would be good option.
post #6 of 22
One of my coworkers has one in his office and the air has a smell similar to when lightning strikes nearby.
post #7 of 22
Ozone is pretty harsh on a lot of materials, particularly rubber.
post #8 of 22
Spray some Febreeze in there and then put them out in the sun. Take the footbeds out too, and spray febreeze on those and same thing - put in sun to dry. One or two rounds of that will do wonders for them.

Works on helmet liners too, although those you can wash by hand too.
post #9 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sinecure View Post
... Take the footbeds out too...
Forgot to mention that step, they'll stay wet and stinky forever if you leave them in...
post #10 of 22
I'm telling you guys, the Odor Eaters spray works wonders on footwear
post #11 of 22
The key to keeping your boots from getting funky in the first place .... and I know some people have naturally damp and funky feet .... but with that said ...

The way to keeping them from getting funky is simple! Your socks should never touch the floor of the lodge!

Take one look at that soggy carpet or floors and the bacteria and mold and god know what else is living on that sodden mess.

I have lived by that rule since I had to "de-funk" one pair of boots a long time ago and never had to repeat the process.

My kid ..... another issue ..... a few normal rinses in some kind of detergent ..... rinse again and hit it with a final rinse with some of that Fabreeze stuff.
post #12 of 22
What Yuki says is true for any footware, bare feet and or socked feet should not touch the floor, even at home, unless you really keep an extremely clean home and you and others never walk in with shoes on.
post #13 of 22
My wife bought my a boot dryer for my birthday. It's a newer type that works off of convection rather than fans. After skiing, I throw my boots on the dryer and all is well. My feat tend to sweat, even on the coldest days. Even after a 2+ hour drive home, my boots are always damp when I pull them out of the bag.
post #14 of 22
Thread Starter 
The boots are not massively stinky. They just reek a bit if you stick your nose in there. I was mostly just fearful of having things get bad during storage over the summer. It sounds like some spray and proper drying should do the trick.
post #15 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
What Yuki says is true for any footware, bare feet and or socked feet should not touch the floor, even at home, unless you really keep an extremely clean home and you and others never walk in with shoes on.

Meanwhile, back in the real world.....

Good job I can levitate at will!
post #16 of 22
Dry them thorouly (shells also, water can seek into the foot board and stink), use some sort of bacteria killing spray and keep them in a dry storage place.

I once had a pair of boots that never left my locker in the lodge, so they never really dried and they smelled like roadkill in the sun... I also had never gotten the liner out of the shell after buying them... Boy, there was mold and fungus inside the shell and outside the liners... Disgusting
post #17 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Squawker View Post
Meanwhile, back in the real world.....

Good job I can levitate at will!

Sandles or slippers would probably be easier........
post #18 of 22
My God .. Richie and I agree on something .....

The concept is simple.

1. Place boots on floor, open and ready to accept foot.

2 Left or right foot ... your choice .... one at a time; remove foot from sneaker/Ulu/muckluck or whatever and ...

3. Place immediately in ski boot.

Note: The sock has never touched the floor!

My boots are in their sixth or seventh season and still don't smell with about 40 to 50 days per season.

My kid .... his liners should be disposed of in a "BIO-HAZARD" bag.

If you can't get a foot from a shoe to a boot without touching the floor please get a designated ..... or some kind of therapy ... or .. try ping pong ..

post #19 of 22
Change from shoes to boots at the car. That way you can't put your foot down otherwise you'd have a cold, wet sock from sticking your foot in the snow and then in your boot...not a pleasant day.
post #20 of 22
baking soda does wonders for stinky boots/shoes. Arm and Hammer (or other brand) stuff. Sprinkle it and and tap the boots/shoes to spread it around. It does nothing for stopping the cause - perspiring feet - but it does help keep the stink down and I've found that at the same time, it seems to help prevent/control athlete's foot (fungus).
post #21 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
1. Place boots on floor, open and ready to accept foot.

2 Left or right foot ... your choice .... one at a time; remove foot from sneaker/Ulu/muckluck or whatever and ...

3. Place immediately in ski boot.

Note: The sock has never touched the floor!

Years ago, someone advised me to never wear ski socks in my street shoes on the way to the hill -- your feet may sweat and make the socks damp, leading to a cascade of problems (cold feet, funk, etc). Since then, I have always put on fresh ski socks right before putting my ski boots on. And at the end of the day, I change back into dry street socks before putting shoes back on.
post #22 of 22
Right, I can get my foot/sock from a shoe into a boot without touching the ground. The ground is probably wet or snowy, so of course I do.

But I am not gonna start wandering around the house in slippers out of some twisted sense of ├╝ber hygiene. My house, my feet, my socks, my germs.....
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