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base flatening

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Anybody do their own base flatening? If so hard is it? Do you use sandpaper, what grits? Thanks,
Brett
post #2 of 14
Try the Ski Visions base flattener, here:

http://www.tognar.com/base_flattenin...snowboard.html

That and a true bar are very effective.
post #3 of 14
skibum- Stu is correct. I have this tool, and it's a sweet tool to have. It is about $69.95 it comes with a flattening bar and a structuring bar to add a general structure to your bases after flattening, and instructions.

If you have Atomics or any other very wide tipped and tailed ski, try not to flatten those areas too much. These skis tend to be a bit concaved in these areas and sometimes makes them feel a bit squirrely. You can flatten those areas some... leaving perhaps an inch to an inch and a half of concaveness in the center of the tip and tail. Much more than that you might be taking too much base material off in those areas, making the base rather thin there.

After making my repairs and scraping with a versa-plane (which I don't like much but be careful with it) I will use 100 grit sandpaper with my sanding machine then follow it with 250 or 300 grit. Then use a Scotch-Brite and rub firmly, then the tool.
post #4 of 14
Quote:
Originally posted by jyarddog:
After making my repairs and scraping with a versa-plane (which I don't like much but be careful with it) I will use 100 grit sandpaper with my sanding machine then follow it with 250 or 300 grit. Then use a Scotch-Brite and rub firmly, then the tool.
My sanding machine?! Huh? What's that? Why not just wrap sandpaper around the mill file....
post #5 of 14
Wow, I think that I`ll try to base flatten my skis,for a major tune-----However I think that I`ll practice on your skis before I do mine!!!----with the new shop equipment and the ability to do it right--why not pay to get it done correctly....once or twice a season.....they can adjust to the mfg`r specs and not take off more than necessary....
I did my own before the shop equip became so advanced..not any more----
post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally posted by Larry C:
Wow, I think that I`ll try to base flatten my skis,for a major tune-----However I think that I`ll practice on your skis before I do mine!!!----with the new shop equipment and the ability to do it right--why not pay to get it done correctly....once or twice a season.....they can adjust to the mfg`r specs and not take off more than necessary....
I did my own before the shop equip became so advanced..not any more----
I used to think like that as well. There are merits to it. But the the shop may not do a good job...

I took my daughters skis in to have the bases ground flat -- why? I don't know....

She skied all winter. There came a time when the Saturday conditions were radically different from Sunday, (cold snap) and race day was Sunday. So, I had to apply the extra cold weather wax.

Step 1 was to remove the old wax. I was lazy, so I used a solvent designed for that purpose.

What an eye opener! There were two things wrong with the bases and one with the tune itself.

First, the bases were'nt flat.

Have you ever seen the results of pushing a board through a thickness planer really quickly?
The board gets wavy, not flat. You need a slow feed rate to ensure no waves appear, because the cutting knives only rotate so quickly. Her bases had identical waves.... These waves cannot be created if you use a mill file and sand paper.

The second problem, was that there were Ptex hairs attached to the bases. These looked identical to those created by sanding and then applying a varnish to wood. The varnish will "raise the grain" and the wood will feel rough. After varnishing, you need to sand again to take out the hairs. I removed these with a sanding pad.

The tune was incomplete, as no texturing was done on the wax.
post #7 of 14
How much was that tune?

A place where I used to take my skis atually takes off the bindings when grinding the base.
post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally posted by Scalce:
How much was that tune?

A place where I used to take my skis atually takes off the bindings when grinding the base.
That was done as part of an unlimited tune package. I guess it should come as no surprise, as a weekly tune over the length of the season works out to around $7.00 each. Normally, we just sharpen and wax.

I can't say if they remove the bindings or not. I've seen covers for the bindings in other stores, so I'd imagine it's the same here.

I shall tune my own from now on, thank you very much!

Cheers!
post #9 of 14
Some thoughts about the above:

1. Flattening w/ sand paper and a file...files aren't always flat and will bend if you put too much pressure on the ends. A tube or block is better.

2. Whenever you flatten, whether by stone grind, flattening tool, or sand paper, remove p-tex hairs w/ scotch brite or an omni pad...also available at tognar. Ideally both, omni pad last.

3. Did somebody say something about texturing the wax? If you're talking about structure, that should be cut into the base before waxing. Wax is then brushed out of the structure.
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally posted by Stu Pidasso:
3. Did somebody say something about texturing the wax? If you're talking about structure, that should be cut into the base before waxing. Wax is then brushed out of the structure.
Not structuring.

Texturing the wax with a nylon brush is done in two ways. For Slalom events a cross-hatch brushing is done on the finished ski to reduce suction. The cross hatch pattern in the wax is a series of channels that remain open to air. It makes the ski easier to turn. 45 degree angle to he sides of the ski is recommended.

A straight tip to tail brushing is preferred in speed events.
post #11 of 14
Take it to a pro at beginning of season and maybe later in year if heavily used. Whats $80-90
over a season when your doing all tuning and waxing yourself? I spend enough time doing that for 7 pairs during the week( my son races).

Take em to a race specific shop in your area. You'll be much happier with the results [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally posted by BigE:
Not structuring.

Texturing the wax with a nylon brush is done in two ways. For Slalom events a cross-hatch brushing is done on the finished ski to reduce suction. The cross hatch pattern in the wax is a series of channels that remain open to air. It makes the ski easier to turn. 45 degree angle to he sides of the ski is recommended.

A straight tip to tail brushing is preferred in speed events.
Got it...my bad. Guess that's why I'm a StuPidasso.
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally posted by Pauliestew:

Take em to a race specific shop in your area. You'll be much happier with the results [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]
It was a race specific shop! : :
post #14 of 14
Get the Swix wax manual: $2.50 from www.tognar.com. It tells all how to prep the bases of skis.
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