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More Retro memories???? - Page 222

post #6631 of 7930
FYI: Cheeseburger deluxe on NJ Craigslist.
post #6632 of 7930

Found this old Ski Magazine from 1974 on google books.  It has a ton of great Ads and Pics...including the K2 Cheeseburgers

 

https://books.google.com/books?id=iYIBM61bKZwC&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false

post #6633 of 7930
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lowell Watson View Post

FYI: Cheeseburger deluxe on NJ Craigslist.

Lowell..you got a link to the NJ craigslist ad for the Cheeseburgers?  I looked and could not find them..unless they are gone!

post #6634 of 7930

https://newjersey.craigslist.org/spo/4834042163.html  No picture or details 

 

 

EDIT: Nope, they are gone.

post #6635 of 7930
post #6636 of 7930
Quote:
Originally Posted by royal View Post
 

I was able to get a few pairs of vintage skis tested this last week.  first were a pair of Dynastar S9's, SUPER STIFFFFFF!  the snow conditions were not amenable to these skis.  as soon as I got enough speed/energy to bend them the snow would let loose and they would just skid.  I may have to try them another day.  second was a pair of LOOK Synthese mad by Maxel.  super soft noodles.  they were great in the large soft moguls and 6" of powder but had no energy  in them on the hard pack. they got boring really fast.  I switched out the some Atomic Powder Plus for a few runs in the skied out junk( one extreme to the other ski wise)  then I finished off the Day on some LANGE BANSHEE's 207cm  great ski. but I'll let @Lowell Watson post up more info as they are his skis. I just had the good fortune to be able to pick them up for him out here(Utah) and fix them up before sending them out to him.  I'll post up my impressions after he does.

 

Royal

 

I went with the LOOK's

 

 

 

I remember REALLY liking a pair of the same vintage Dynastar X9's (cross ski between S9 and G9).  Great ski at speed!

post #6637 of 7930

Over the holidays, I found my recently passed father's old skis. Dynamic VR20FX in an 195, Tyrolia 390 from some period in the early 80's.  My father skied these for years and years and years, then my older brother got them as hand me downs.  I had no idea they were still around and am very happy to have them.  The will shortly be wall mounted in a non-destructible manner.

 

Can anyone nail down the year?

 

 

 

I know the earlier VR17's were a hot ticket, but haven't heard much on these.

 

These skis would need a lot of edge work to see snow again, and I am mulling it over.  I'm not terribly well versed on the Tyrolia bindings either. They look pretty beefy with lots of metal.  Are these still a relatively safe binding to use or a time bomb?

 

The skis next to them are Dynastar Lafille in a 168. Foam core rec ski from the early 1990's, I assume. My wife was skiing these when I met her in 2010. I had to get that situation sorted out... :duck:

post #6638 of 7930
What you can't see in the pictures is how plum crazy purple these are. Someone kept these meticulous with every nic professionally ptexed, razor sharp edges, and overall beautiful condition for a 1970/71 ski. These just got bumped to the front of the line.


post #6639 of 7930

Was at my bootfitter today admiring their vintage gear wall.

 

post #6640 of 7930

tuning sticker on a Vectris?  :)

post #6641 of 7930

Once again Youtube:  A long Lost Art.

post #6642 of 7930

Ya gota but the period at the end of it!

post #6643 of 7930
Quote:
Originally Posted by rx2ski View Post
 

Was at my bootfitter today admiring their vintage gear wall.

 


Just Rossi?  or is there an OLIN section and a HEAD wing?

post #6644 of 7930
Quote:
Originally Posted by royal View Post
 


Just Rossi?  or is there an OLIN section and a HEAD wing?

 

There is another section, but a lot of new skis were leaning against them so I didn't take any photos. Next time!

post #6645 of 7930

I got out today on my old Rossi Stratos for a few runs. They're the same length (190CM) as some Volkl P30's I've been skiing a lot recently...

 

 

...but they are a lot straighter! The P30's are I suppose fairly primitive by today's standards, but they actually have plenty of shape and can be skied with modern technique - tip and they turn. They have great edge hold, are fast and fun, and from a dimensions perspective they're the closest thing I have to the Strato's. Even so first run on the Strato's they felt really clunky like XC skis - definitely needed time to find the balance and additional input to make turns, more steering. But had a pretty good experience overall, much better than the last time I tried skiing them. After a few  runs started to get some feel - pressuring the front more in the early part of the turn, then moving my weight back to the tail of the ski as the turn progressed. I think if I were to ski them for a full day or two I could get pretty comfortable on them, but I probably won't do that. There are only so many ski days, after all, and much to learn.

 

With that in mind just watched this video again, originally posted by MastersRacer, and thought I'd bump it. Pretty nice little time capsule from the era when those Strato's came into being. Those guys really were amazing skiers!

 

 

Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post
 

Just came across this on Vimeo - apologies if it's been posted before...

 

 

SKI RACER – a film by Paul Ryan on the 1969 World Cup circuit - A Summit Films Production

 

I made Ski Racer in 1969, 39 years ago. I watch the film today and wonder about all the choices that go into making a film. There is no traditional narrative, no singular event was portrayed; rather I was trying to use the cinematic process to convey the visceral element of ski racing and its nuances, in particular the emotional dichotomy between severe racing competition among individuals and the more reflective joy of free skiing. I wanted to create a cinematic equivalent to all this.

 

As Dumeng Giovanoli says in the film, “I like to race because I like to be better than my friend… to go faster than him. But when the racing season is over, I go back home and ski for myself… free, in powder, it’s like you fly… that’s really skiing not racing. Racing is something different, much different.”

 

The film is impressionistic, it treats Slalom, Downhill and Free Skiing as separate experiences with different emotions. Fragments of many different races are edited together to create nature of each discipline.

 

The significance and the appeal of Ski Racer probably lies more in the film making than the subject matter. It was perhaps the first film to combine the irreverent energy of rock music, optical effects and complex quick cut editing to create a transcendent subjective representation of racing.

 

I avoided traditional narration in favor of using the very personal voices of the racers themselves. Billy Kidd, Jean Claude Killy, Spider Sabich, Dumeng Geovanolli, Karen Budge, Karl Schranz, and many others, seemed to welcome the chance to express their motivations and feelings of what racing meant to them.

 

The film is reflective of the times. The ferment of late sixties is echoed in the interlacing of music from The Grateful Dead, Steve Miller, Mike Bloomfield, and Indian Ragas with the ski action.

Paul Ryan November 10, 2008

Addendum: Just watching, and "Quicksilver Girl" spurred my memory. Sure enough, MastersRacer posted this one a while back. I even commented on it. Ha!

 

Oh well, good to see it again!   ;-)

post #6646 of 7930
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post
 

Over the holidays, I found my recently passed father's old skis. Dynamic VR20FX in an 195, Tyrolia 390 from some period in the early 80's.  My father skied these for years and years and years, then my older brother got them as hand me downs.  I had no idea they were still around and am very happy to have them.  The will shortly be wall mounted in a non-destructible manner.

 

Can anyone nail down the year?

 

 

 

I know the earlier VR17's were a hot ticket, but haven't heard much on these.

 

These skis would need a lot of edge work to see snow again, and I am mulling it over.  I'm not terribly well versed on the Tyrolia bindings either. They look pretty beefy with lots of metal.  Are these still a relatively safe binding to use or a time bomb?

 

The skis next to them are Dynastar Lafille in a 168. Foam core rec ski from the early 1990's, I assume. My wife was skiing these when I met her in 2010. I had to get that situation sorted out... :duck:


I believe the VR 20 FX is from 1983-84, possibly 1984-85, seemingly 2 entirely different skis.

 

 

1983-1984

From SKI Magazine Sep 1983 (no photo):

Quote:
Dynamic’s new VR20 series of high performance recreational skis are patterned closely after the VR27 racing-series skis…Also new is the VR20 FX ($225, 172-204cm), a soft,-flexing recreational ski with a quick-turning slalom sidecut.

 

From SKIING Magazine Sep 1983 page 96 (only has a photo of the VR 20 ZL):

Quote:
The new VR20 series from Dynamic replaces last year’s VR15 group and includes three sport models for intermediate to advanced use. (Speaking about the VR20 ZL) Like its companion model, the VR 20 FX, it is designed to be easy-turning and forgiving of mistakes, yet suitable for a wide range of terrain and snow conditions. Unlike the FX, it incorporates metal in its construction to give it what the company calls more “energy”.

 

 

1984-1985

From SKI Magazine Oct 1984 page 192 (photo shows the blue stripes on tip but the rest doesn't quite look red):

Quote:

$240, LENGTHS: 170-205cm

Manufactured in France and recommended by the company for “easy turning in all snow conditions,” the VR 20 FX uses a new construction for Dynamic - a wet-process foam sandwich with a layer of perforated, flexible steel below the core for durability and liveliness. In lab tests, it proved to be one of the widest skis in the recreational group, with a GS-type sidecut - both features that should provide stability at recreational speeds. Said our 125-pound tester: “Dynamic’s racing heritage really shows through on this one. It’s quick, stable, and extremely predictable - perfect for the skier on the way to becoming an expert.” Said our 160-pound tester: “Really shines on hard snow. Terrific ski for the recreational racer. Feels like it was built just for NASTAR.” Although neither tester called this a ski for the novice, they both checked “super” under turning ease, so it’s likely the novice skier would find it enjoyable as well. LAB TEST DATA: Length tested, 190cm; weight, 1.8 kg; waist width: 68mm; sidecut radius, 58 m; overall stiffness, 34 N/cm; shovel stiffness, 5.9 N/cm; middle stiffness, 55 N/cm; heel stiffness, 7.5 N/cm.

post #6647 of 7930
Quote:

 

 

1984-1985

From SKI Magazine Oct 1984 page 192 (photo shows the blue stripes on tip but the rest doesn't quite look red):

 

That's them. The stripes on my ski are grey with red outlines- Looks to match the 1984 1985 model.  1984 would fit my expectations for when my father would have purchased these. In 1981 he moved from MI to Logan UT. After college he had given up on skiing ice in MI, and he never skied in Utah.

 

He moved to Boulder, CO in 1983, and a co-worker took him to Eldora in either 1983 or 84.  It blew him away. From that point, he was a skier again, and was always kicking himself for never skiing in UT while he lived there.  Him buying skis in 1984 would fit.

 

I am surprised to see that these skis were in the rec ski category. In everything, my father tended to buy the best, even if a more forgiving product would better suit his needs. I wonder who talked him out of buying a full race ski- maybe the guy that took him to Eldora...

post #6648 of 7930

I'm amazed looking at the prices for top of the line skis in the mid 80s versus today.  They aren't all that different, or are they?  A 19" top of the line TV cost $400 bucks in the mid 80s.  Today $400 will get you a Chinese 40" flat panel easily.  Today $250 won't get you brand new top of the line Chinese made skis though. 

post #6649 of 7930

Electronics are not a great comparison because the constant innovation makes prices cheaper (Moore's Law).

 

 

A $250 ski in 1984 is equivalent to $568 today when you factor inflation.  So yes, prices have increased, but by maybe 30%...

post #6650 of 7930
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post
 

Electronics are not a great comparison because the constant innovation makes prices cheaper (Moore's Law).

 

 

A $250 ski in 1984 is equivalent to $568 today when you factor inflation.  So yes, prices have increased, but by maybe 30%...

 

I was thinking that lower labor costs of China today versus US/Japan (union shops back then) in the 80s offset the inflation to a significant degree. Shipping costs are now higher than labor for many complex consumer goods.   It will be very interesting to see what happens to the prices of consumer goods next year if the price of oil stays very low for the foreseeable future.

post #6651 of 7930

1234

post #6652 of 7930

I just had to do it and break these out of the basement--I haven't even looked at them in ages.

 

Ballet skis from the late 80s/early 90s:

 

 

 

And, if you're wondering, NO--the bindings did not release and the Besser plates were screwed directly onto the ski. We put duct tape around our boots to make sure we didn't catch the heel.

post #6653 of 7930

Super long poles for pole flips and spin launches.  I've seen some of the DIY static binding variations but mostly Spademans.  However, I've never seen two completely different skis, different brand and everything LOL!  Seen mismatched pairs of different model years or colors, but never two different skis entirely!

post #6654 of 7930

Those are two different pairs of skis.

Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 

Super long poles for pole flips and spin launches.  I've seen some of the DIY static binding variations but mostly Spademans.  However, I've never seen two completely different skis, different brand and everything LOL!  Seen mismatched pairs of different model years or colors, but never two different skis entirely!

 

Those are two different pairs of skis--I just didn't untape the skis to show all four of them. :)

post #6655 of 7930

I know bindings can be indemnified, but I think in these cases, the skis are indemnified.

post #6656 of 7930

Was it common practice to do ballet with non-releasable bindings? 

post #6657 of 7930


Yes, it was.

post #6658 of 7930
Quote:
Originally Posted by MastersRacer View Post
 

Was it common practice to do ballet with non-releasable bindings? 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by rx2ski View Post
 


Yes, it was.


Lots of crossovers and tip drags, bindings cranked all the way or just plates like above...

post #6659 of 7930

It makes sense based on the maneuvers, but I wasn't aware of it happening. Too busy racing, I guess. :-)

post #6660 of 7930

The Vokl P20's in 1996 were $735 new. I remember getting them half off. They were made in the father land though with a core from their own trees. The core was impressive. Many shops had one on the wall.

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