New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Motel room tuning

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
Got to know how you tune and wax in the room and not get kicked out of the room. Also, if traveling light, what is in your bare minimum tuning kit?
Thanks,
Greg
post #2 of 29
if it's a short trip, just use bring diamond stones, a multi-tuner, and a wax whizard. Leave the iron at home.
post #3 of 29
Thread Starter 
Thanks Bro,
I am looking up wax whixard as we speak.
Greg
post #4 of 29
Liquid wax
post #5 of 29
In February I was in CO for a week, and felt I wanted one mid-week tune.

I had one base repair to do, so I did the Ptex repair sitting on a bench on the front porch of the hotel with the ski in my lap.

I did some light edge work with a multitool and diamond stone. No appreciable debris, no problem.

I waxed in the room with an iron. The most important thing is to be stingy with the wax, so there are no drips and as little scraping as possible. (If you do the fiberlene method instead of scraping, even better, but I did not want to try something new on the road).

When the wax cooled, I went into the bathroom (tile floors), spread newspaper, and scraped carefully. A light brushing motion with a damp paper towel picked up the few wax flakes that escaped.

My biggest scare was I bumped one ski that was cooling and the edge left a mark on the fiberglass/plastic tub enclosure. Fortunately it was color only, not a tangible scratch, and shampoo on a washcloth with vigorous scrubbing took it off.

But yeah, wax whizard might be eaiser....
post #6 of 29
Thread Starter 
Thanks all,
If I hot wax, I will crayon on and run the iron with shop towels to avoid all the excess. I am looking at the ray's wax whizard for sure.
Greg
post #7 of 29
An old bedsheet cut in half added to the tune up kit for the trip helps.

Usually the tough stuff (base work / file / scrape etc) is done leaning from the vanity or dresser to the floor or between two objects that are the same height.

Crayon on the wax and bring the iron. Just be sure you use the iron in the bath area WITH the fan on. Trust me......it gets a little tough to explain there really wasn't a fire in the room or you were not smoking in the non- smoking room when the smoke detector goes off in the whole complex and the begin to evacuate.
post #8 of 29
Uncle Louie, I understand that flames and melting snow follow you as you ski, but flames and smoke from your bases while waxing usually means your iron is too hot...


In addition to above suggestions:
-Brake retainers.
-Liquid, spray & cream/paste waxes are very convenient but require ventilation and cannot be flown on planes. For road trips they are great, but still bring the iron for increasing durability.
-Snow conditions (abrasiveness and wax hardness) will dictate frequency. Now, with abrasive corn snow & softer waxes=higher frequency.
-Small vises or simply a lasso clamp and boards on books or chairs, table or counter, help to expedite the process. A portable tuning stand is best.



-A small & basic 'touch up' pocket guide and 70mm diamonds may be more than enough to maintain smooth, sharp edges.

post #9 of 29
My list is very close to Alpinord's:

-appropriate wax for the expected conditions
- wax iron (smaller ski travel irons are also sold)
-Rubber bands for break retainers
-side edge bevel tool
-diamond stone (maybe also a metal file)
-gummi stone
-one or two sharp plastic scrapers.
-wax brush

Place contents in a small bag and pack with skis or checked luggage.

Pick up the local newspaper to place under skis while waxing. I usually do this on the floor although using two chairs or even a dresser drawer will often work.

I scrape and brush skis outdoors mostly. If it is bitterly cold you can may be able to use the bathtub/shower-stall. These small enclosed environments keep the shavings confined and away from the hotel room carpet. Remove the wax shavings from the floor of the tub/shower when done so that they don't clog the drain.
post #10 of 29
Thread Starter 
Thanks to all you fine tuners and maintenance junkies!
G
post #11 of 29
I've been using the crayon technique described by Bob Barnes earlier this season where you touch the wax to the iron and then rub it on the bottom of a warmed ski and iron it in. Use a paper towel between the iron and ski to do the final smoothing and you don't need to scrape. You also create no drips.

I carry a bunch of asparagus rubber bands for brake retainers, a side edge guide and file and a pocket stone, along with a wax selection and the iron.
post #12 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post
I carry a bunch of asparagus rubber bands for brake retainers
I hate to disagree with such and esteemed Bear, but I prefer broccoli rubber bands. They're quite a bit burlier
post #13 of 29
Wax in the bathroom.
post #14 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
-Liquid, spray & cream/paste waxes are very convenient but require ventilation and cannot be flown on planes.
Actually, MAXX WAXX made by Maxiglide has a Jojoba oil base that has no VOC's and is nonflammable and can be transported by air. I carry it but am sold out.

post #15 of 29
You can go to Home Depot and pick up disposable plastic drop cloths for maybe a little over a dollar each....they are huge enough to cover most of the room and come wrapped tight enough to be able to fit two of them in a coat pocket.
post #16 of 29
Introducing the Wax Razor, another possibility to help keep the scraping mess contained:



post #17 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord
-Liquid, spray & cream/paste waxes are very convenient but require ventilation and cannot be flown on planes.
Good catch, this was an inaccurate generalization.

Should have read:

-High-melt, durable, liquid, spray & cream/paste waxes are very convenient but require ventilation and cannot be flown on planes. There are other similar products that are less caustic and can travel by air.
post #18 of 29
Terry,

Have you used this wax wizard thing? It looks like something that would come in handy a lot for me, but if it's junk, i'd rather keep my normal methods...

All my tunes are done in the middle of the floor with the ski laying on an old bedsheet. It works fairly well, except any hot wax drips make the floor slippery underneath.. no big though, but I'd like to try that wax wizard thing just because it would save some of the hassles of cleanup...

God, I can't wait until I get a real place and not a cruddy 1 bedroom apt... college.. mehmeh... I want my own work area where I can leave my tools all laying out and stuff... Right now it's all packed into a small craftsman plastic toolbox...
post #19 of 29
You mean the Wax Razor, correct?

The jury is still out. I was contacted by the developer/manufacturer and should be receiving a few samples in the near future. You are welcome to test drive one and see what you think. Upon receipt, I intend to put it through the paces and write a review and Blog entry on our site. It seems like it would be a good option for some for mess containment while traveling or small spaces.

From the developer:

Quote:
I have made it out of transparent polycarbonate, for durability and so you can see it filling up as you scrape. The poly is also very resistant on breaking, so you can really bend it, twist it, and throw it around without breaking it.
(FYI, polycarbonate, aka Lexan is the most durable plastic available, AFAIK.)
post #20 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
Uncle Louie, I understand that flames and melting snow follow you as you ski, but flames and smoke from your bases while waxing usually means your iron is too hot...
THANK YOU, (I think)

It was actually the heat from the iron that set off the detector. They (at least the good ones) are heat sensitive as well as smoke sensitive. Stupid me set up right under the detector w/o thinking about it and pluged in. (It really didn't take long either)
post #21 of 29
I once tried rubbing wax on, running a blow dryer over it, then corking it, I'd say it lasted better than the liquid waxes I've tried. But, I always take an iron for a trip lasting more than two days per pair of skis I take (or if I guess the weather horribly wrong I'm just careful dripping wax and scrape outside).
post #22 of 29
I went up to Timberline and Canaan for the Governors Cup a couple weeks ago.

We hot waxed in our room with a fire detector on. The key is to use and adjustable temperature iron that is correctly set for the wax.

Shavings on a drop cloth plastic sheet.
post #23 of 29

Cork technology FINALLY catches up to fat skis.

That's right. 9 elbow tearing, pec-ripping, forearm training inches wide.



Gaiam


Surely I'm not the first one to notice these at the chain bookstore next to the swish-chocos and coffee and think 'A-HA!'
post #24 of 29
My and my teammates stayed at a hotel before state champs 2 months back. We asked the desk lady if there was a room that would be suiting, and we got to use the basement. After they kicked us out (past hours)(we only got a few of the 10 pairs done), we looked around the hotel and found a bookshelf (small, movable) in another floor. We took it, brought it back to our room, and used it as our bench. Just bring old towels/sheets to put on the floor.

As for equipment, we brought everything (ptex candles, wax, stones, irons, loads of brushes, clamps, and all of the other goods) and put it in a duffel bag and tackle box. If you have one of those swix portable tables, that would be nice to have too. A good thing to cary equipment in is a small tackle box, good for keeping many diff things in one box. That way you can put stones in one section, brushes in another, wax in another, and retainers/clamps/file guides in another. As for the iron, just clean it and throw it in your bag.
post #25 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post
I had one base repair to do, so I did the Ptex repair sitting on a bench on the front porch of the hotel with the ski in my lap.
Boy do you live dangerously, I hope you didn't miss the ski.:
post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
Introducing the Wax Razor, another possibility to help keep the scraping mess contained:



I've seen this before selling on Ebay, but has anyone purchased it, used it and does it work?
post #27 of 29
I use an old plastic shower curtain liner to catch the wax/debris etc. I have also found in most motels (especially the cheaper ones!) that you can very easily fix vices to the vanity unit or desk.
post #28 of 29
Being a former racer and now coach, I've waxed, sharpened, repaired my fair share of skis in hotel rooms. The best possible tactic, for me:

1) Do everything, if possible, outside. I'll sharpen outside, repair a base outside and scrape outside.
2) Cover everything where you'll wax. Something that you can throw afterwards is a bonus. I usually use newspaper on top of a plastic tarp that I keep in my car.
3) If my bases are very dry, I'll give two separate coats instead of one, big, messy one.

I also always have a basic kit with me in the car at all times: 2 guides, a couple of brushes, a good, portable iron and diamond files. I'll bring a file if I feel I'll need one, but really, if you keep your skis in top-notch condition all the time, there's not a lot fo times when a file is absolutely needed.

Have you ever tried asking for a room to do your thing ? Motels are aware that racers (or serious skiers) will mess-up everything so they usually have something just in case (may it be a barn, spare storage room or the lobby).
post #29 of 29
At Park City, I waxed my skis out on the balcony... in January.

Also.. I have waxed my skis in the ski parking lot using an inverter hooked up directly to the car battery. Leaning one end of the ski on the car bumper, having someone else hold up the other end of the ski. Have to set the iron temp just a little higher for outside temps.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs