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MA Request - Page 2  

post #31 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post
Uhhhh, no.

The closer the legs are together horizontally, the closer they have to be vertically (assuming relatively flat snow - e.g. not moguls). The wider the legs are apart, the more easily they can have different degrees of bending to achieve different lengths. Try it standing up at home.
Ummm.......Stand on the floor with your feet together. Lift one leg as high as you can. It is much easier to lift it straight up then if you widen your stance and you can bend your knee further
post #32 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by HERB View Post
I'm not an instructor, but I just got new boots so there you go. I just tried the dryland tipping as suggested by therusty ...
To be perfectly clear, I did not suggest a tipping drill. I suggested a long leg short leg drill.
post #33 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by volklskier1 View Post
Ummm.......Stand on the floor with your feet together. Lift one leg as high as you can. It is much easier to lift it straight up then if you widen your stance and you can bend your knee further
Good point. That does create long leg short leg.

But this is why I said "e.g. not moguls". I generally don't ski lifting one leg high off the snow, unless I have to pee.
post #34 of 45
Thread Starter 
This is an MA thread of my video, could you continue your general skiing discussion elsewhere please?
post #35 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post
Good point. That does create long leg short leg.

But this is why I said "e.g. not moguls". I generally don't ski lifting one leg high off the snow, unless I have to pee.
Oh Now I think I understand what you mean. If I spread my legs and then move my body over one leg I get a long leg short leg and the difference is greater than if I have a narrow stance. And when I do that statically all of my weight ends up on the short or inside leg. Doesn't this lead to the problems we see on the hill all the time?

Why on a flat is this important important? Even on a flat, Once I start to get speed and angulation comes into play, don't I get vertical seperation?
post #36 of 45

Bingo...

Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post
This is an MA thread of my video, could you continue your general skiing discussion elsewhere please?
...this is the ways these things usually end up. See what I said, above. If this helps, fine. If it doesn't, send me a PM or look at somebody else's advice...
post #37 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post
The closer the legs are together horizontally, the closer they have to be vertically (assuming relatively flat snow - e.g. not moguls). The wider the legs are apart, the more easily they can have different degrees of bending to achieve different lengths. Try it standing up at home.
Hi Rusty - I'm having trouble understanding you, so I'd like to clarify, but I'll do it elsewhere since this is SMJ's MA thread.

So, to be clear on the original topic, do you think the original poster's skiing would be helped by trying to widen his stance? I see a lack of angulation that means a wider stance would probably result in too much weight on the inside ski.

Simon
post #38 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by volklskier1 View Post
Oh Now I think I understand what you mean. If I spread my legs and then move my body over one leg I get a long leg short leg and the difference is greater than if I have a narrow stance. And when I do that statically all of my weight ends up on the short or inside leg. Doesn't this lead to the problems we see on the hill all the time?

Why on a flat is this important important? Even on a flat, Once I start to get speed and angulation comes into play, don't I get vertical seperation?
SMJ - this will tie into your MA - I promise!

What we're talking about here is the ability to move the legs independently. We see this as a common element in higher level skiing. Yes, too much weight on the inside ski can cause problems. But the difference between the static exercise and real skiing is that the forces of the turn will help to transfer weight to the outside ski. IMO, vertical separation comes from the pitch of the slope - this is where the distance between the feet is greater than the distance between the legs. No matter what the pitch of the slope is, you'll get greater vertical separation from greater stance width.

It is possible to make turns beginning with both legs extending, both legs retracting or one leg extending while the other retracts. For the type of turns seen in this video clip, independent leg movement makes for more efficient turns. If there is a slightly wider stance width and more use of long leg/short leg then there will be less vertical movement in this skiing and more effective use of the ski edges and less of a need to direct the skis across the fall line. Changing from one leg long to the other leg long allows the hips to travel from one side of the skis to the other without changing vertical height and transfers pressure to the new edges earlier in the turn.
post #39 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Simon Kinahan View Post
So, to be clear on the original topic, do you think the original poster's skiing would be helped by trying to widen his stance? I see a lack of angulation that means a wider stance would probably result in too much weight on the inside ski.
Well, shoot. My opinion is that either approach could help. Right now the tipping, as already observed, is coming from the whole body. I'd like to see the tipping action focus more on the lower body. The previous suggestions could lead along that path. There are pros and cons to either approach, but either way I would not focus on trying to change the stance width to change the skiing. My teaching focus would be to introduce movements that would change the stance width as a byproduct. However, sometimes I will ask for a stance width change to facilitate a drill. A narrow stance facilitates tipping drills. We also use a cowboy stance (feet wider than shoulder width apart) to facilitate learning core movement. I realize this is confusing, but don't have time to clarify right now. My thinking has been mostly along the lines of VS.

The point for SMJ is that my early recommendations (without doing a full analysis) are that a focus on lower leg tipping and on long leg/short leg are two candidates for next season. There are many different roads that can be taken to early edge engagement. I don't intend to disagree with too much that has already been said.
post #40 of 45
Back to some MA of SMJ's skiing...

I'd like to see you focus on a few things:

1. Being patient as you transition from one turn to the next. Make medium to longer radius turns and focus on starting the turn by changing to the new edge and then letting the turn happen as opposed to making something happen with movements.

2. If you want to shape your turns more than the ski sidecut and flex allow, focus on turning the legs (femurs in the hip socket) in the direction you want to go.

3. Make an effort to "ski" into a countered position by continuing to turn the legs in the direction of the "old" turn even as you begin to think about starting the next turn.

Mike.
post #41 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post
A narrow stance facilitates tipping drills. We also use a cowboy stance (feet wider than shoulder width apart) to facilitate learning core movement. I realize this is confusing, but don't have time to clarify right now. My thinking has been mostly along the lines of VS.
Gotcha. Thanks Rusty.

Simon
post #42 of 45
OMG that is as lot of info.

Feet-stance-weight-blah blah.

You have the concept, you have the correct body movements. I like the equip set up. I know that pitch is steeper than it looks. A gentler slope might be better for working on this - but you really just need to SET that edge. Despite the good physical form - you are not mentally "buying" that the ski WILL hook up if you really step on the bug. (Keep tuned carefully for best performance on our beloved slightly frozen groomed "loose granular.")

The GS turns looked good. Use the whole hill - SET and feel gravity pull you "around" the Mt.
post #43 of 45
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Racer256 View Post
OMG that is as lot of info.

Feet-stance-weight-blah blah.
.
Good point.

I do ski better on steeps then that vid shows too, and my approach recently has been a more down the hill all-mountain type turn, rather then a more arc-to-arc racing style, which i'd been focusing on for over a year.

Skiing is done for the year now.
post #44 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Racer256 View Post
OMG that is as lot of info.

Feet-stance-weight-blah blah.

You have the concept, you have the correct body movements...... but you really just need to SET that edge. Despite the good physical form - you are not mentally "buying" that the ski WILL hook up if you really step on the bug.
.
This is baloney. The body movements are NOT correct. It is NOT mental. And I doubt many here would recommend that he "SET that edge".
post #45 of 45
Thread Starter 
Well this thread really didn't give me any of the real trained MA I was hoping for. Don't get me wrong there have been some great and usefull criticisms and comments, but it's really turned into something other then an MA thread.

So I'm going to close it. Something Supporters can do to threads they start (look under the Thread Tools menu.)

PM me if you have anything you want to add.
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