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Skiing in Powder - Fore/aft balance - Page 5

post #121 of 131
"Do you know anything about skiing?"

"No, but I did watch an instructional bump video last night"
post #122 of 131
If you ski powder submerged it is very important that you keep your ski tips down below the surface as you turn. Im talking regular deep powder. Nothing too heavy or shallow. In order to get the ski tips down below the snow surface its important that you keep your weight forward and in deep powder that comes to your knees you are usually pushing powder with your upper body as well and that adds to the need to stay forward. Skiers with bad technique try to lean back and that will not work other than very close to the fall line. The next step for these skiers if they cannot stay forward and deep down would be to get phat skis and ski ontop but then they would need to be out of the back seat so the moral of the story is that we need to be forward and generally speaking try to stay out of the back seat in most every situation. The need for us to lean slightly back if we ski powder comes way after we actually master the art of powder. It will be automatic. Same applies to steep slopes and bumps as well. We need to adjust fore/aft balance depending on the situation also when we are out of the pow.

I loved that laughing cameraman on that video ! Skiing was sloppy and fun, just like its supposed to be.
post #123 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skidude72 View Post
What effect does skiing at speed on top of the snow have on f/a balance vs. skiing slower and more in it?
If you ski ontop your f/a balance should be like it is normally, out of the back seat and forward!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skidude72 View Post
What effect does skiing with a backpack have on f/a balance?
It shifts your CoM further back and you need there fore lean even more forward in order to maintain the same f/a balance!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skidude72 View Post
What effect does the moisture content of the snow have on f/a balance?
The more moisture the content carries the more resistance it has on your submerged body parts, boots and skis. This resistance gives your CoM a momentum that tries to tip your CoM forward. Therefore you need to lean back a bit but as the snow gets deeper even if resistance increases the distance between that resistance and your CoM decreases and you dont necessarily feel much more forward momentum on your upper body. I try to stay very flexed for this particular reason and extremly flexed on my first few turns to feel out the perfect balance required. Like a bomb falling into the snow.

There is annother aspect on the moisture content and the fore aft balance that I would like to express and that is if you are skiing with too short skis like I was in St Anton a few years back the ski tips would simply just submerge and dive straight down pointing towards china. I had a hard time digging myself out. In order to ski such snow I needed to get in the back seat and get the ski tips to come out off the snow and then turn. Let me try to make a photomontage..... here:
http://ski.topeverything.com/default...nt&ID=F9+77887
post #124 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by volklskier1 View Post
"
"No, but I did watch an instructional bump video last night"
Learn anything?
post #125 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars View Post
I ski steep powder runs much the same as I ski moguls. Good theories here skidude.
There ya go! I finally read this whole thread. Apparently I'm not the only
idiot.
post #126 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gooberhead View Post
There ya go! I finally read this whole thread. Apparently I'm not the only
idiot.
Whats the big argument about? BTW, isnt Lars the guy that skis powder really nicely? I remember a video, excellent. One can still be an idiot thou.... .
post #127 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
Whats the big argument about?
Some people get bent when we say a narrow stance is better functionally and aesthetically than looking like a troll on barrell staves.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Phlogiston View Post
So it seems that we all agree: people should ski with their feet at their natural distance from each other.

Thus, for an evolved, balanced and graceful human being, that stance is very narrow; for troglodytes and neanderthals, the stance is very wide.

And a person can use independent action of each leg if their skis are only 3 or 4 inches apart. The skis never touch along their entire length because of the presence of brakes; if they ever do clack together, it's because of independent motion.
post #128 of 131
Oh.

Some one said... Increased speed results in increased drag (friction?)

My experience is opposite. Speed= float= less drag as I rise up out of the snow.

If we think about our skiing, and reflect on the turns that define the experience, we must grasp that a "turn" changes the slope of the hill we are on. Our own manipulations result in constantly changing acceleration.

Skiing is not a position!

CalG
post #129 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cgrandy View Post
Oh.

Some one said... Increased speed results in increased drag (friction?)

My experience is opposite. Speed= float= less drag as I rise up out of the snow.

If we think about our skiing, and reflect on the turns that define the experience, we must grasp that a "turn" changes the slope of the hill we are on. Our own manipulations result in constantly changing acceleration.

Skiing is not a position!

CalG
True.....but you can increase speed and not float the ski. It depends on tip profile, angle of attack, ski dimensions......a person can force a level ski with tip pressure. This is all too dynamic to talk about
post #130 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gooberhead View Post
True.....but you can increase speed and not float the ski. It depends on tip profile, angle of attack, ski dimensions......a person can force a level ski with tip pressure. This is all too dynamic to talk about
Yes, what you actually do is you stay retracted a bit longer into the fall line. This will reduce drag and you accelerate without floating the ski. Then you extend towards the end of the turn and inhale snow . Way too dynamic way too dynamic.....
post #131 of 131

Why?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gooberhead View Post
True.....but you can increase speed and not float the ski. It depends on tip profile, angle of attack, ski dimensions......a person can force a level ski with tip pressure. This is all too dynamic to talk about
Why would you do that?

CalG
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