or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Review: Mojo vs Cronus

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Had a chance to alternate Head Mojo 90's and Blizzard Cronus's same day, same slopes. Since several good reviews exist about each, I'll limit this to specific contrasts.

Skis: 173 Blizzard Cronus, 176 Head Mojo 90.
Me: 6', 164 lbs, advanced, middle aged, taking racing lessons, like to turn. More finesse than power.
Where: Waterville Valley, NH
Conditions: 23 degrees, 4 inches to boot top of new pow over scratchy groomed and bumps.

In pristine to cut pow: Edge to the Mojos here. Think "turn," and they did, tip came up without asking, enjoyed a variety of turn shapes and strategies. Liked a very centered COM. When hardpack showed up underneath, edges bit without fuss. Cronus's came around as quick, but preferred forward pressure, had secret want to find the bottom and carve it.

In soft fluffy bumps: Slight edge to Mojo. Liked any kind of turn strategy I threw at them, while Cronus preferred a fairly precise pivot. In fairness, both skis were superior at this.

In trees: Big edge to Mojos. In my earlier review of the Cronus, only real complaint. Better this time, but still felt a little stiff in the forebody to really surf through tight glades, tips still didn't come up without some encouragement. Mojos just rocked. Best tree ski I've ever been on.

In chopped pow with humps and scrapped off patches: At lower to moderate speeds, a wash. Above 25 mph, Cronus's just got happier, remained very secure, while Mojo's became looser in tip and tail, sweet spot shrank to underfoot. But they never failed me, and were very easy to recover. Again, both were superior in this.

In bumpy groomed (packed down by skiers, old school, instead of machines): Big edge to Cronus. Just set the arc and let'em carve. Steer as needed. Handled the washboard and small chunks without a hickcup. Mojo's were fine as long as you gave them attention, especially felt sensitive to inside/outside weight distribution. Began to argue at speeds north of 30 mph; tails wanted to go find the halfpipe.

Overall: Both these skis are wood core with carbon bits, no metal. Both are light, with moderate flex, but they seem to have really different flex patterns. The Mojo felt fairly stiff right under the boot, then very progressive, almost linear, softening toward tip and tail. The Cronus felt fairly stiff from behind the heel to front quarter of ski, then rapid softening. So the Mojo initiated and finished effortlessly, ate up bumps, probably loves jumping, but in the middle of a carve, felt like less of the edge wanted to engage. By contrast, the Cronus felt more like a light GS/Cross scaled up; put some pressure in front and they just came around quickly and smoothly, over and over. More of the edge felt engaged with less attention.

If I were mainly skiing softer groomed, trees, bumps, and occasional pow up to mid-calf, I could definitely see the Mojo as a 50/50 one quiver solution. If I were usually skiing firmer surfaces, including bumps, faster, with crud common, and the pow tracked out by mid-morning, I could definitely see the Cronus as a 50/50 one quiver solution. Both are fine skis, just different missions...
post #2 of 9
Beyond, nice review and tracks my impressions of the Cronus which I skied yesterday (in the same length) for the second time. Conditions at Saddleback were great with appx 6" of fairly dense pow. Coming off dedicated carving skis (Ripsticks) I am still figuring these skis out. But they are stable in the extreme and bust through cut up powder and the wind packed condtions we had yesterday. It is amazing to be on a ski the is rock solid in fast GS turns, yet turns on a dime. And on the top of the windblown trails, they handled themselves very well on the ice - very predictable, quick and tenacious.

Do you find the front of the ski "light"? Perhaps it is the dimensions which I am not used , or the construction, but I am finding that the tips do not hook up as with my Rips and M666's, and that turns seem to start more under foot, with the front of the ski following. Again, my first few hours on these, and first experience on wider boards. Driver inexperience a definite possibility.
post #3 of 9
Which mounting point are you using? (there are two pre-drilled).
post #4 of 9
Whiteroom, it is the forward one.
post #5 of 9
Damn, I love my Mojos! I have 'em in 176 (5'9", 170) I've been recommending the snots outta them to anyone who loves the tight trees, freshies and the bumps... Hope you enjoyed them as much as I do... Nice review!
post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 
Deliberate, for me the Cronus's shovel was fairly easy to hook up for a ski of this mission, not super stiff, yet quite solid at speed. Had the forward mount. Didn't feel as quick as the Mojo, but higher speed limit. Wasn't even close to my 66-68 mm carvers, of course. That's why some of us still like skis less than 70 mm.
post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 
DoWork, I can see why you love your Mojos. They're definitive for soft tight spaces. (Uh, talking about ski runs here. )

These are both great skis.
post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
Deliberate, for me the Cronus's shovel was fairly easy to hook up for a ski of this mission, not super stiff, yet quite solid at speed. Had the forward mount. Didn't feel as quick as the Mojo, but higher speed limit. Wasn't even close to my 66-68 mm carvers, of course. That's why some of us still like skis less than 70 mm.
I am sure it is just a matter of getting used to them. Like you said, they are not carvers - and I am coming off a pair of Elan Ripsticks with a 64cm waist. But the Cronus do amazing things on hard. Truth be told, I skied them better on hardpacked than I did in 6" of powder - but that's because I have been on so much ice this season I had forgotten how to ski on anything that does not loosen yer fillings.
post #9 of 9
[quote=beyond;888569]They're definitive for soft tight spaces. (Uh, talking about ski runs here. ) quote]

That's why they call 'em Mojos, baby! BOOYAH!!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Member Gear Reviews