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If you didn't fall today... - Page 2

Poll Results: If you didn't fall today...

 
  • 27% (16)
    ...you aren't trying and didn't learn anything.
  • 42% (25)
    ...you probably learned something anyhow.
  • 16% (10)
    ...you are a Ullr himself and have nothing left to learn.
  • 13% (8)
    ...you probably feel better than if you did.
59 Total Votes  
post #31 of 42
If I didn't fall today I was

A) Happy to be skiing within my abilities
B) Working on my strengths rather than my weaknesses
Or
C) Lucky
post #32 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by eblackwelder
Actually, I was sitting in my chair and spontaneously fell out of it for no apparent reason. There should be some kind of safety bar across this thing. Which brings me to an occasional popular topic on this forum...... ::

Quote:
Originally Posted by axebiker View Post
Throw out that chair.
I'd just tighten the bindings - sounds like pre-release to me...

How hard were you riding it?
post #33 of 42
I rarely fall. Once or twice a season. Falls scare me.

The last time I fell this year, I was skiing fast in trees and my right tip hooked and dove below me. (stupid jet fuels in crusty snow.)

I did a head-plant and stabbed my tail into the snow to stop before smacking birch. That's my biggest fear, head-planting a tree.

That tumble stopped my tree-skiing that day. (stupid jet fuels...)

It seems like whenever I fall, I always have this; "That could have really ruined my entire family's life."

I find it hard to keep up the confidence after those falls. And, those are the only ones I ever have. The "Oh SHIIIT" ones.

I miss the days where falling had to something to do with learning technique. Falling these days has nothing to do with technique, but rather errors in judgement.

Trees have really gotten dangerous with the development of pow skis. It creeps me out a bit.
post #34 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by samurai View Post
I rarely fall. Once or twice a season. Falls scare me.

The last time I fell this year, I was skiing fast in trees and my right tip hooked and dove below me. (stupid jet fuels in crusty snow.)

I did a head-plant and stabbed my tail into the snow to stop before smacking birch. That's my biggest fear, head-planting a tree.

That tumble stopped my tree-skiing that day. (stupid jet fuels...)

It seems like whenever I fall, I always have this; "That could have really ruined my entire family's life."

I find it hard to keep up the confidence after those falls. And, those are the only ones I ever have. The "Oh SHIIIT" ones.

I miss the days where falling had to something to do with learning technique. Falling these days has nothing to do with technique, but rather errors in judgement.

Trees have really gotten dangerous with the development of pow skis. It creeps me out a bit.
Thanks for the buzz-kill. But you're right. I don't fall too often, but when it do, it's usually pretty spectacular. I often wonder how I got away with another one.
post #35 of 42
I haven't fallen today, but I haven't run into any Extreme Carving Ruts either.
post #36 of 42
sorry for the buzz-kill.

carry on...
post #37 of 42
Back in '99 I changed from my old Fischer 205 GS skis to a set of 187 Salomon X-Screams. For one season I skied them like I had skied my Fischers. I would randomly catch a tip and go down, couldn't cruise like I did on my Fischers and just got plain frustrated with my new purchase. I finally signed up for a lesson, level 7 according to the the schools criteria. I ended up skiing with the area's TD because they didn't have any other Level III instructors. At the end of the two hour lesson he asked me to join their instructor pool and the next season I spent working on my PSIA Level I certification.

That year was a revelation. The TD had us doing stuff way out on the edge of the comfort envelope. I crashed so many times the other instructor trainees knick-named me Crash, a name my daughter reminds me of to this day. The fact is, I learned you sometimes have to exagerate or over reach, or over compensate to retrain the brain and muscle memory. I know if I'm trying to learn something new and I've got to go slightly beyond my comfort zone to make it stick. Even now as I continue to refine my skiing I will still bite the big one as I push the margins. Then, and when I don't complete my turns in the moguls!

If you don't fall at least every now and then you probably aren't working on a steep learning curve.
post #38 of 42
I always used to say that I never heard of someone who got hurt who did it without falling, therefore my goal was not to fall. I proved I was right on this theory last year by only falling twice. The second time the end line of the fall was a tree and a pile of logs, then the hospital. At 56, I don't need falls like that. So this year, I focussed more on control, and every time I felt myself trying to catch up with some friend, whether or not I was "comfortable" with that speed, I told myself to cut it out. I still fell (every time I am happy to say was in DEEP powder, so soft), but it was not at a speed that invited disaster and broken bones. I had a couple near misses in the trees that were NOT so innocent of danger, but they just re-enforced the idea that control is what is important and once you've got control, then work on smoothness, but give up that speed thing. And yeah, I'm "not on a steep learning curve", but after 36 years, should I be?
post #39 of 42
When I catch a tip I quickly shift my weight to the other ski and get the tip uncaught. This happens by reflex, just as quickly as I used to 'uncross' my tips back in the days of straight skis, when crossing my tips was a problem sometimes.
I keep my bindings set loose; about DIN 6. If I catch a tip and lose a ski I maintain my balance on the remaining ski and lift the other foot until I can stop. This hasn't happened for years.
I wax my skis with paste wax nearly every time I ski; rub them smooth with a cork, and then polish them further with a microfiber cloth that's designed for polishing car wax. My skis are very slippery.
I have many instances in each run, even on blue groomers, where I know that I could have carved a better line; or skidded with better control on sheets of glare ice; or made a more perfect, effortless transition from turn to turn. It's possible to carve a turn perfectly, then get caught flattening out the skis if the transition happens on ice or crud, and then 'uncarve'; blow the link between the turns. I'm working on going from release, through transition, to the new edge and turn, perfectly, regardless of the surface; it's difficult to do on refrozen ruts and bumps.
Sometimes on a trashed surface I have to fall back on the old method: wait until the centers of my skis are on the crest of a bump and use leg rotation to turn them in the direction I want to go before dropping down; then edge properly once I'm back in full length contact with the surface.
My skiing probably looks perfect to some people, but I can feel moments of pressure, drag, and less than perfect balance.
I work on these and I'm getting better all the time. No need to fall.
post #40 of 42
I ain't a big faller but still hapens once in time cuz I love to push hard(which brings consequences) but the last time I felt was a total yard sale. First run in the morning, temps sub zero, a groomed blue. There like a difference in height between 2 passe on the groomers which was about 4 inches high (which I didn't saw) and I was doing some high speed GS turns and hit the friggin step. Let's say my skis decided they've had enough and stayed there but not me. I ended skidding on my back foot first and my coat went up 4 inches so my back rubbed against the snow till a little blood came out. Didn't hurt too much but I makes me kinda cautious for the rest of the day.
post #41 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by samurai View Post
I rarely fall. Once or twice a season. Falls scare me.

The last time I fell this year, I was skiing fast in trees and my right tip hooked and dove below me. (stupid jet fuels in crusty snow.)

I did a head-plant and stabbed my tail into the snow to stop before smacking birch. That's my biggest fear, head-planting a tree.

That tumble stopped my tree-skiing that day. (stupid jet fuels...)

It seems like whenever I fall, I always have this; "That could have really ruined my entire family's life."

I find it hard to keep up the confidence after those falls. And, those are the only ones I ever have. The "Oh SHIIIT" ones.

I miss the days where falling had to something to do with learning technique. Falling these days has nothing to do with technique, but rather errors in judgement.

Trees have really gotten dangerous with the development of pow skis. It creeps me out a bit.
Stupid Jet Fuels?
post #42 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post
Stupid Jet Fuels?
compared to my goats, in crusty snow, in the trees... yes.

Those two runs of the day should have been on the goats.
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