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MA: GrooK in Sölden

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
Hi guys

I finally got some vid of me skiing - it's difficult to find a decent cameraman

Info about me:
18 years old
from Denmark
skiing since I was 2 or 3
I'm a little less than 6ft
I weigh about 145lbs
The ski I am on is Fischer rc4 wc rc 180cm
Boots are Fischer rc4 with flex 120
Poles are 125cm

Vision was very bad that day in Sölden..

What I think:
A little backseat - probably because I'm used to being much closer to the fall line, but I was trying to traverse a lot and complete my turns for you guys - I should have gotten some vid of me skiing like I normally do, but that'll have to wait till next year..

A-framing - mainly in transitions.. I got this one worked out - sadly I don't have filming of it..

So..
What do you guys think?


Thanks in advance!

Best Regards,
GrooK



http://www.youtube.com/v/MNIFruq-M7A
post #2 of 22
Thread Starter 
Come on you Europeans! I know you're online now..
post #3 of 22
So you've sorted the A-framing - not that I saw a huge amount of it anyway, just a couple of glimpses...

The hands might be better slightly forward, and that might help you pull the top half of your upper body forward too. Particularly, with the hands, I noticed the inside hand dropping back a little bit, which could be stopping you from getting your upper body facing further in a different direction to the skis.

It also looks like you might be forcing your heels out slightly to finish the turns off (probably as you're not fall-lining it as much as usual so your not used to letting the skis run as much) - something I can be accused of sometimes.

Caveat: Very inexperienced instructor's thoughts...
post #4 of 22
Grook, so you never did find a good cameraman did you . Anyway, gotta hit the bunk now but a little something here first. To me it looks like you are a good skier and you clearly know how to keep that ski on an arc and how to make round turns. You also have fluent movements and considering that flat light and quite wide radius skis to keep your speed up I think you did great. What stands out to me is that you are still trying to figure it all out. You are thinking too much. You need to work on specific tasks and try to make them part of your default movements. Like keeping your head upright or tipped slightly away from the turn, sort of like perpendicular to your levelled shoulders. A-framing is not a big crime in my book but you seem to be very square to your skis and a bit shaky. You also lean into the turns insted of angulating. Work on drills that improve your balance over the outside ski and try shorter radius skis.
post #5 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by skisimon View Post
So you've sorted the A-framing - not that I saw a huge amount of it anyway, just a couple of glimpses...

The hands might be better slightly forward, and that might help you pull the top half of your upper body forward too. Particularly, with the hands, I noticed the inside hand dropping back a little bit, which could be stopping you from getting your upper body facing further in a different direction to the skis.

It also looks like you might be forcing your heels out slightly to finish the turns off (probably as you're not fall-lining it as much as usual so your not used to letting the skis run as much) - something I can be accused of sometimes.

Caveat: Very inexperienced instructor's thoughts...
I guess we're noticing almost the same issues I'm having a little trouble about knowing where to put my hands - I've always skied like that and feel like they are in place there. But poleplant in Europe is different from how you do it in the US and the Scandinavian way is different as well.. At least that's how I learnt how it was back in the days But I'll try to move my hands a little longer forward What else should I be working on?
post #6 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
Grook, so you never did find a good cameraman did you . Anyway, gotta hit the bunk now but a little something here first. To me it looks like you are a good skier and you clearly know how to keep that ski on an arc and how to make round turns. You also have fluent movements and considering that flat light and quite wide radius skis to keep your speed up I think you did great. What stands out to me is that you are still trying to figure it all out. You are thinking too much. You need to work on specific tasks and try to make them part of your default movements. Like keeping your head upright or tipped slightly away from the turn, sort of like perpendicular to your levelled shoulders. A-framing is not a big crime in my book but you seem to be very square to your skis and a bit shaky. You also lean into the turns insted of angulating. Work on drills that improve your balance over the outside ski and try shorter radius skis.
My next ski will be with 13m - my only problem is that I need to sell a ski to buy a ski Studying makes you poor The only reason I'm thinking a lot is that I'm used to going closer to the fall line. I almost never ski like this, and I usually ski faster as well.. At least this is what I think I counterbalance fine when I do normal arcs - down the fall line and not like C..
post #7 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by GrooK View Post
I'm having a little trouble about knowing where to put my hands
Just an idea to think about - it might not work for you (as you say, you're used to what you do). When you are moving past the mid phase of the turn, pretend you are punching someone: For a right hand turn, following the 'pole plant', pretend you are punching a person standing alongside the front of your left ski; this will get your hand moving forward and increase your counter (angle between the direction your upper and lower bodies are facing).

That's the main thing I noticed. I agree with tdk6 that a bit more angulation could be good. By leaning into the turn your getting the skis on edge, but with your left turns (not so much your right turns) the body looks a little straight - try touching the piste below you with the downhill pole (quite good to try on an easy red), this will get your shoulders moving more parallel with the piste and should help to creat a larger angle between upper/lower body.
post #8 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by skisimon View Post
Just an idea to think about - it might not work for you (as you say, you're used to what you do). When you are moving past the mid phase of the turn, pretend you are punching someone: For a right hand turn, following the 'pole plant', pretend you are punching a person standing alongside the front of your left ski; this will get your hand moving forward and increase your counter (angle between the direction your upper and lower bodies are facing).

That's the main thing I noticed. I agree with tdk6 that a bit more angulation could be good. By leaning into the turn your getting the skis on edge, but with your left turns (not so much your right turns) the body looks a little straight - try touching the piste below you with the downhill pole (quite good to try on an easy red), this will get your shoulders moving more parallel with the piste and should help to creat a larger angle between upper/lower body.
This sort of skiing will sure look funny But sure sounds like some good drills for me to do.. I'll try them out if I go to Zermatt this summer.. Otherwise they'll sadly have to wait for next season
post #9 of 22
Thread Starter 
bump
post #10 of 22
Well, here I go.
I think there's some decent solid skiing there but I also see quite some room for improvement

I agree with Skisimon about the hands and the upperbody, it's that seating position that puts you in the backseat.
Try to put some more pressure on the front lip of your boots and try to keep your hands (almost) always within sight. You should always be looking at where you're going (or intending to go) and not down or so, and you should always have your hands in that field of vision.
A more solid poleplant will also help bring your hands and upper body forward more.

I also agree with tdk6 on the angulation however I'm not a believer of too much counter. I (and the Belgian ski fedeartion and ESF) like skiers to maintain parallel axles, the line through your shoulders should be parallel to the one through your hips, knees and toes. Not only horizontally (and thus parallel to the hillside) but also longitudinal (no rotation of the upper body in relation to the lower body, or at least not too much and there are exceptions like in a GS or SL course).
Try skiing with your poles sticking out to the sides (uphill pole pointed uphill, the other one downhill) and ski like that. Keep your arms and poles in one line with your shoulders and try to keep that line parallel to the slope.
You can also do the same just by holding the poles in front oy you at eye height which also keep your view forward and might even help your forward stance.

I do notice the A-framing and to me it's a sign of too much pressure on the inside leg or/combined with not enough action with that leg. Try lifting the inside leg and crossing it over your outside ski at the end or even during a turn. Try rolling the inside ski more on it's edge than you do now.
Oh, that's right, you already have that covered!

I think tdk6's remark about "thinking too much" hits the nail on the head as we say in Dutch. I too believe it compromises your skiing and that that might be (partly) the cause for the a bit static skiing.

Lastly, with longer ski's like that you might want to keep building pressure until the end of your turn, the more pressure the more the ski bends, the shorter the radius of your turn becomes. I'd like to see a bit more active amplitude.

There, I'm sure there will be different views on your skiing, this is just mine and I'm open for comments!
post #11 of 22
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the input so far I'm already planning some drills for my next vacation. Please keep 'em coming
post #12 of 22
Thread Starter 
Guess I'll bump it to get some US input (sorry)
post #13 of 22
Yeah, I'd love someone to (dis)agree with my analysis

Next time you're going to the Alps let me know.
We should have a Euro Bear Get Together and I'll bring my Icelantic demo's.
post #14 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Schussboelie View Post
Yeah, I'd love someone to (dis)agree with my analysis

Next time you're going to the Alps let me know.
We should have a Euro Bear Get Together and I'll bring my Icelantic demo's.
You have no idea how much I would love that

I'm thinking about going to Zermatt this summer in July.. Sadly there's probably no powder to try out the Shamans in But I'd love for you to come rip with me
post #15 of 22
Grook,


Just looking at the angle of your thigh and your back…looks like backseat skiing to me…


I have had this problem in the past, here a few tips to fix it.


Try to keep your hips over your balls of your feet..

I second, skisimon idea of punching with the hand during turn transitions…
Its usually the end of the turn that puts you on your tails and thus in the backseat.

The punching forward movement well help pull your body forward…


I practiced the above tips on easy trails and progressively worked on more steeper terrain.



The only other thing I was taught was not to pole plant making wide GS turns…since it interrupts flow and usually puts me in the backseat…

My humble analysis…. Thanks for bumping my previous question!
post #16 of 22
Thread Starter 
thanks sk55 bumping what?
post #17 of 22
Grook,

I really like your ability to tip the skis onto edge. You are also getting some nice upper/lower body separation (angulation) in a few of these turns. Overall, there is very little skidding in these turns.

3 observations:
1) Your turn initiating movement is more lateral than "fore-agonal" (i.e. diagonally forward)
2) You lean into the turns
3) At 6', 145 pounds the wind must be blowing you into the back seat.

If you don't move forward at the beginning of the turn, you're bound to be behind at the end of the turn after the skis have accelerated down the fall line. As soon as you get into the fall line, you start dipping your shoulders into the inside of the turn. This severely inhibits your ability to stay balanced through the end of the turn. This is causing a whole litany of weird body movements (e.g. uneven edge angles, hands too low, skis having a mind of their own, etc.).

The bad news is that the desired new movements can be extermely hard to learn. The good news is that you could be one of the lucky ones poised for things to just "click" and quickly enter a much higher level of skiing ability. The best drills to improve your skiing (e.g. White Pass turns, Pivot Slips) are the hardest to self teach. Getting some top quality coaching could be well worth the money. A drill where you lift the tail of the inside ski and tip it into the new turn (documented in more detail in books that have been mentioned way too many times here and also available on the net - sweat a little and you can find it) may also work. Another drill that may help is ditching your poles and carrying bamboo across your shoulders. Keep the boo level with the pitch of the slope at all times.

One more recommendation: either take up ski flying, ski directly behind someone to have them block the wind, or eat a few thousand extra cheeseburgers ok? I'm sorry, but making a serious comment about such a healthy lifestyle would put me in a serious funk.
post #18 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post
One more recommendation: either take up ski flying, ski directly behind someone to have them block the wind, or eat a few thousand extra cheeseburgers ok? I'm sorry, but making a serious comment about such a healthy lifestyle would put me in a serious funk.
Not after watching 'Super size me' I ain't that healthy I just got an insane metabolism

Thanks for the drills though I got a lot of work for my next vacation that's for sure

I actually feel like the wind has a lot to do with my position when I hit a lot of speed - however, this was not a factor in the video :

Next time I ski I will be getting some where I'm not in the backseat, and closer to the fall line - you guys will probably complain that I don't complete my turns .

Btw. you (therusty) always use screenshots from the vid when you do a MA Where are they!? ::
post #19 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by GrooK View Post
Guess I'll bump it to get some US input (sorry)
I agree.....some bump skiing would be great for you........that looks so boring
post #20 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gooberhead View Post
I agree.....some bump skiing would be great for you........that looks so boring
I'll put that in my next vid as well
post #21 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by GrooK View Post
Btw. you (therusty) always use screenshots from the vid when you do a MA Where are they!? ::
Sheesh - I don't always do it and it's a ton of work. You guys don't know what you're getting for free. Wait till you see what real pros charge for this kind of service.
post #22 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post
Sheesh - I don't always do it and it's a ton of work. You guys don't know what you're getting for free. Wait till you see what real pros charge for this kind of service.
Oh we do know. And we appreciate it very much
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