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do you ...have you worn a helmet - Page 2

post #31 of 54
So, if you want to take the RISK of not wearing one, that's OK with me, just accept the responsibility for your own injuries, even if you think it is someone else's fault.[/QB][/quote]

Bingo , but lets extend that to " If you are going to take the risk and ski, accept the responsibility for your own injuries."
post #32 of 54
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by dirtybkr:
Bingo , but lets extend that to " If you are going to take the risk and ski, accept the responsibility for your own injuries."
That's not very American of you.
post #33 of 54
Thread Starter 
...as of 96 responses to my question there are roughly 25% of the respondents that do take more risks with a helmet than not. At least 25% that will admit it. I'd be interested to know if anyone who is a full time helmet wearer and answered no to the question would be willing to ski a couple of days without the helmet to see if they skied slower and with more awareness.

I'm in full support of those who chose to wear a helmet. They have many good reasons to wear one. Having said that, I think this poll might suggest that helmets like groomed slopes and inebriation make some feel more comfortable about increasing their velocity beyond their ability. Another interesting development in the helmet is the integration of earphones in the ear flaps. Anyone got the Giro 9 or Fuse with the integrated ear phones for their mp3 player?

I'm not looking to raise the ire of folks who are ardent supporters of helmets. I'm more interested in the changes that we're seeing in snow sliding culture.

Thanks for playing.
post #34 of 54
There is no doubt in my mind that for many skiers helmets extend their comfort zones and therefore have the potential to promote skiing beyond one's ability. But I certainly cannot say that helmets are entirely useless either. I choose not to wear one, for now.

What I find ridiculous is a helmet with integrated ear phones. Which part of common sense would promote "safety equipment" that gives up hearing. The stupidity is endless. :
post #35 of 54
Quote:
Originally posted by PinHed:

Another interesting development in the helmet is the integration of earphones in the ear flaps. Anyone got the Giro 9 or Fuse with the integrated ear phones for their mp3 player?

I can't see that making much difference - they've had earphones (buds) that would fit under your helmet for years. I think the people who listen to music when they ski are already doing it. If anything the fact that its around the ear and not it it might make it safer because it's easier to hear.
post #36 of 54
Thread Starter 
[quote]Originally posted by altagirl:
Quote:
I can't see that making much difference - they've had earphones (buds) that would fit under your helmet for years. I think the people who listen to music when they ski are already doing it. If anything the fact that its around the ear and not it it might make it safer because it's easier to hear.
I agree. In fact, I think that it makes the choice to buy a helmet a bit more enticing. In my case I wear CIC (completely in the canal) hearing aids. I sometimes remove them for skiing because I like not hearing the white noise around me. If I had a helmet that had the ear buds in the ear flaps then I'd definitely remove my aids and enjoy just the music. [img]smile.gif[/img]
post #37 of 54
Quote:
originally posted by PinHead: ...as of 96 responses to my question there are roughly 25% of the respondents that do take more risks with a helmet than not. At least 25% that will admit it. I'd be interested to know if anyone who is a full time helmet wearer and answered no to the question would be willing to ski a couple of days without the helmet to see if they skied slower and with more awareness.
It sounds like you are second guessing the self-awareness of those of us who are part of the 75%. I think you are looking for a smoking gun that probably isn't there. For instance, I was a skier for more than than 20 years before putting on a helmet. Pretty much set in my skiing ways. The helmet didn't change the way I ski. About the only thing that has changed my skiing in recent years is mid fat skis. Even then, I don't take more chances with those skis. I just enjoy more the skiing that I do.

Furthermore, I am unwilling to give up my helmet even for a few days to test your hypothesis. The thing is just too dang comfortable.

[ December 02, 2003, 05:39 PM: Message edited by: lifer ]
post #38 of 54
Quote:
Originally posted by PMZ:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by Jellis1323:
[QB]Just a little fact that we proved in one of my physics and engineering classes:

Helmets are null in void after 13 MPH.
QB]
I beg to differ. Seeing as you took a physics class you should know better. Change in momentum = Force X Time. The more cushion and protection you have on your head, the longer it takes for your head to slow down. If you hit a tree head on, there is nothing to slow it down gradually, but with a helmet, it gives it that extra quarter of a second to slow down, which is crucial. It's why we wear seatbelts, it's why dashboards are padded; more time to slow down. Wouldnt you rather jump from your roof onto an asphalt driveway, or a giant sheet of thin wood? Probably the wood, even though it would break, it would slow down your impact time.

Personally I just think your dumb not to wear a helmet. It's like not wearing a seatbelt or not wearing a helmet when biking.
</font>[/quote]I just wanted to apologize for not elaborating more. PMZ is absolutely correct about the cushion effect that the helmet offers. What I was trying to say was that it offers no better effect/protection after it reaches 13 mph, though I've heard that speed has been upped to 15. Better helmets are made that are able to withstand higher speeds, but not many people will buy those helmets as, usually, only racers wear them.

Hope I explained a little better and sorry about the mix up.
post #39 of 54
Lemme knock the 13 or 15 mph theory right out of the box with 2 words;

Glancing Blow.

Sure, nothing's gonna be real helpful when your head meets tree or terrain head on at 20+ mph, but how about a low branch?

At 25 mph, you clip a 2" branch with your forehead. Results;

Without helmet- On your ass, or into the trees or ditch. Possibly with a concussion, nasty gash requiring stitches, or simply a hell of a lot of pain.

With helmet- Maybe lose balance, but probably no cut or bruise, and a minor annoyance at best.

Or...

Coming down a jagged couloir, you catch an edge and fall to the side, result;

You get the idea.

But most people don't shut the barn door til after the horses have run off, so keep ridin without one. I'll see you wearing a shiny new Boeri the day after your first concussion.
post #40 of 54
The stuff in my head is what pays for my skiing. I wear the helmet, we all win.
post #41 of 54
pinhead

On the angle that wearing protective devices induces an increased acceptance of risk, I offer this:

Autos and seat belts? just do it, it is the law in many places.

Motorcycles and protective gear? ouch! it hurts to be stupid!

Skiing and head gear? good decision for a variety of reasons in a Darwinian sense.

Hard helmets for contact sports? I draw the line at soccer, because I would like that game to go LESS physical in order to celebrate masterful play. There needs to be some team sport that accepts players with out genetic specialization!

Hocky and LaX have an image to project!

For me, there have been many times over the years that I have not, or did not wear a helmet while skiing. For the first moments, felt vulnerable, ( perhaps it was the exposure to cold air but after a bit, it went unoticed. From that, I conclude that protective gear wearing does not of it's self promote additional risk taking.

Regards

CalG
post #42 of 54
I wear a helmet 80% of the time - 20% when it's too damned hot, especially doing spring skiing - primo corn, big steep soft bumps. I like to ski in the trees, so I bought the helmet for that reason. I pick my way through the trees, but I have the speed notched up when I know the line through the trees. When the wind picks up, whiteout, blowing snow, snow falling over an inch an hour, fog, etc. it sure is warm. But for some reason, I don't like to wear a balaclava, because it keeps me from breathing correctly and my goggles fog up. I've been meaning to buy a full-face helmet, one time last season I hit a chin-high branch - it brought tears to my eyes, but I kept on truckin'.

I had a wicked fall on my road bike and I cracked my helmet going about 22 miles per hour. I skidded for about 10 feet. But any road bicycle helmet is no good against any motorized vehicle collision.

I wish Team Wendy would make a full helmet - the one they have now is a half-lid. The foam inside the helmet can take multiple impacts - how well it degrades the third impact, I haven't a clue.
post #43 of 54
Quote:
Originally posted by Xdog:
Lemme knock the 13 or 15 mph theory right out of the box with 2 words;

Glancing Blow.
I totally agree.

Like someone else said, it is also great for when people pull down the bar too quick and knock you on the head.

I have wiped a few times and my head has hit the ice and all I felt was a bump.

It has already been worth it's money as far as I'm concerned.

I also do not think I ski faster or more dangerously because I wear a helmet.

If people don't want to wear a helmet than that's their call but don't try to knock people who do wear them.

I wish more magazine and resort adds and pictures would show people with helmets to set a good example for kids.
post #44 of 54
About 3 or 4 years ago here an inexperienced skier got himself onto a run called Concussion (appropriately named), and got scared because he was in over his head, and I guess not familiar with the hill.

Anyway he made a fatal mistake, he took his skis off and tried to walk down. He lost his footing and slid into a big fir tree head first, he died as a result.

A friend of mine was patolling and attended the mishap. He told me without a doubt, if the guy had a helmet on he would still be alive. It can happen that easy especially if you are in steep terrain.
post #45 of 54
Quote:
Originally posted by Harry Morgan:

In addition to a full face helmet, I carry a transceiver and full avi gear, and I wear a back protector/upper body armor, shinguards and a cup.
Now children, take out a circle of paper and a safety crayon and take note:

Living is hazardous to your health. Everything you do entails risk, including doing nothing. Understand the consequences of taking risks but don't let it rule your life.

If you feel you need this sort of protection to go skiing you shouldn't be doing it. Sliding down slippery slopes in a freezing environment with all sorts of sharp and pointy hardware strapped to you body is not the safest thing in the world to do. Skiing is fun because of the risk. If you don't like this then maybe you should take up snowshoeing, but don't do it in winter because you might die of hypothermia, better do it in a safe park in summer.
post #46 of 54
Glancing Blow.

Sure, nothing's gonna be real helpful when your head meets tree or terrain head on at 20+ mph, but how about a low branch?

At 25 mph, you clip a 2" branch with your forehead. Results;

Without helmet- On your ass, or into the trees or ditch. Possibly with a concussion, nasty gash requiring stitches, or simply a hell of a lot of pain.
QB][/quote]

Last year while skiing trees, I ducked to miss a evergreen limb. When I came back up my forehead/helmet hit a tree limb. Yes it knocked me on my butt. Luckily we were all able to laugh about it as apposed to sending someone to get the Ski Patrol.

Helmet 1
Tree 0
post #47 of 54
I've never worn one for skiing and probably will not do so in the future. However, I took up boarding last year and took a nasty fall getting off a lift on the rock hard ramp ice that rang my bell - so I will have a brain bucket on the first time I strap on my board this season. I mountain bike a lot and always wear a helmet... the few times I've forgotten it my ride is pretty much ruined because I become overly cautious. My thinking is that once I get used to it on the board I may get so used to it that I'll feel weird without it and start wearing it while skiing. Does this make any sense to you guys?
post #48 of 54
Crank--

Your comments make sense to me and to others who have posted on helmet related threads. I started wearing a helmet after being clocked from behind by an out of control skier. I realized immediately how warm and comfortable a helmet is, particularly when I am wearing goggles. The warmth and comfort are bonuses that you get every day even if you don't come close to conking your head on something.
post #49 of 54
After 45 years of skiing, I got a helmet last year. I switched to tele a couple of years ago, and I do like to ski in trees at times. With the loss of precision associated with my telemark skiing, I just feel more comfortable wearing the helmet. It is also warmer in bad weather, and light enough so I am not really aware of it when skiing. For me, it just makes me more comfortable doing what I am going to do on skis, anyhow.

I think of it the same way as I do about wearing a face mask in hockey. I play with a bunch of guys some of whom wear full cages, some have only eye shields, and a few have only a helmet without any face protection. Everyone makes their own choice, but after having sticks bounce off my face cage a number of times, I think I have made the right choice for me.
post #50 of 54
Never have worn a helmet on East Coast trails. Never have, never will. Even on ice. I don't fall often.

Do wear a helmet sometimes in trees.

Do wear a helmet most of the time big mountain.

Do wear one in the park most of the time.
post #51 of 54
On a different note, go back and look at the results of this poll. It says almost 1/3 of people here take more risks because they wear a helmet. If this increase in risk taking translates more crashes does this mean helmet wearers are a hazard to themselves and others? It sounds like SUV syndrome, you feel better protected so you take more risks and inadvertently cause harm to others. I would be very interested to see the balance between injuries reduced by helmet use, and injuries to users and others as an indirect result of helmet use.
post #52 of 54
Quote:
Originally posted by michaelHunt:
I don't fall often.
post #53 of 54
Quote:
Originally posted by Poodlebitespoodlechewsit:
I wear mine all the time on the resort. However when I go touring I don't. I guess it's because I do a lot of ascents and I am too hot wearing a helmet and taking it on and off really gets to be a pain. It's much easier wearing a toque that I can just pull off and stuff in my pocket. Also I don't do a lot of crazy lines in the b.c. I am much more reserved than on resort.
Interesting. Most of the lines I've found b.c. are so seldom skied and so treed in that I'd rather wear a slalom helmet than anything else.

I am surprised no one has mentioned one helmet advantage: they make fantastic car pillows! Seriously, if I need to conk out in the car it's helmet-on and good night.
post #54 of 54
I have skied with a helmet pretty much every day of my life since I was 6. The odd time that I have gone without it, I felt naked. For me, not skiing with a helmet is like playing hockey without a cup. Sure, you may preform the same, but you don't feel as safe. I never ski without a helmet unless I am skiing home or something.
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