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How to exercise those weird stuff around your knee?

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
Sprained my knee, got MRI, said partial medial collateral ligament avulsion tear from its attachment to medial femoral condyle ... doing therapy now.

It's a low speed fall and my binding is only DIN 5.5 as type I (5'11 170lb). After recovery, till next season, what kind of exercise can I do to strengthen those ligament and whatever stuff around my knees? I was hoping some day I was able to fall with DIN 10 and still get up and go.

I was running on treadmill, swimming, light weight lifting, etc. Plan to get back to inline skating. Are there anything more specific? Thanks
post #2 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by whoever View Post
Sprained my knee, got MRI, said partial medial collateral ligament avulsion tear from its attachment to medial femoral condyle ... doing therapy now.

It's a low speed fall and my binding is only DIN 5.5 as type I (5'11 170lb). After recovery, till next season, what kind of exercise can I do to strengthen those ligament and whatever stuff around my knees? I was hoping some day I was able to fall with DIN 10 and still get up and go.

I was running on treadmill, swimming, light weight lifting, etc. Plan to get back to inline skating. Are there anything more specific? Thanks
Leg extensions.......then front squats. Weight training creates strong knee support.
post #3 of 23
Thread Starter 
Thanks. I was doing those, just not very consistently. Might be more dedicated now that I have a goal.

What about those ligaments? I look down there and seems no amount of muscle will help when you legs are pushing sideways. Are there any exercise on those? I was doing lots of stretching after running. Will that help?

Or is that if your legs are strong enough, you won't get into those positions to begin with?
post #4 of 23
you can't strengthen ligaments. not sure how much leg strength helps either, picabo street blew out her acl, and look at the size of her thighs. in fact, the stronger your quads, the better the chance they can overpower your acl when you try to recover during a backward fall.
post #5 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by whoever View Post
... doing therapy now.
....
...
...
I was running on treadmill, swimming, light weight lifting, etc. Plan to get back to inline skating. Are there anything more specific? Thanks
I hope your therapy is being done with the advice of a traind PT. Ask your physical therapist, not us, what to do. They are by far the best people to ask.


That being said, I think swimming is one of the best things you can do. Also just try not to strain things when you fall; pick up your skis and fall on your back/side (not head though.
post #6 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by epl View Post
you can't strengthen ligaments. not sure how much leg strength helps either, picabo street blew out her acl, and look at the size of her thighs. in fact, the stronger your quads, the better the chance they can overpower your acl when you try to recover during a backward fall.
I heard that too. My therapist points out there's a muscle going over the teared ligament. So I'm exercising that part hoping it helps.
post #7 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
I hope your therapy is being done with the advice of a traind PT. Ask your physical therapist, not us, what to do. They are by far the best people to ask.


That being said, I think swimming is one of the best things you can do. Also just try not to strain things when you fall; pick up your skis and fall on your back/side (not head though.
Yes, it's done with guidance. Those were my past routines and dreams in a few months. My swimming was limited to walking in water for now :

This is my first year skiing, never had a serious fall till now. Kind of felt invincible for a while
post #8 of 23
If you have no qualms about a little illegal activity or go to an "anti-aging" clinic........steroids help immensly with injury recovery........both anavar and testosterone help with tendon strength. Deca-durabolin helps the joints by carrying more fluid and increasing collagen synthesis. Plus you build muscle back much quicker.
post #9 of 23
Forget the PT guys........go to your nearest college football guys......they'll tell you how to rehab from knee injuries.
post #10 of 23
Thread Starter 
Are you sure it's safe? I always heard those stuff are bad for you ...

Anyway, finally learned that long winded name short for MCL.
post #11 of 23
I sprained my MCL when I was playing soccer in high school. I did a lot of stabilizing rehab on one leg. For example, my trainer made a 4-square box on the floor and I had to jump on the injured leg from square to square in different sequences. Corner to corner, front and back, left to right. The stronger the muscle becomes, the less the leg will rely on the strength of the tendon to do the work. Since it is the MCL, I would also look at doing some rubber band exercises where you stand, hook a band around your ankle and to something else solid and have the the band resisting you moving your leg from outside to across the midline of your body. This will strengthen the inner-thigh which is the muscle that is connected to the MCL! Good luck.
post #12 of 23
find a soccer coach.
post #13 of 23
Your PT will design a "maintenance" program for you.
post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by whoever View Post
Are you sure it's safe? I always heard those stuff are bad for you ...

Anyway, finally learned that long winded name short for MCL.

Not done properly.......in fact they can help you become governor of CA
post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by epl View Post
you can't strengthen ligaments. not sure how much leg strength helps either, picabo street blew out her acl, and look at the size of her thighs. in fact, the stronger your quads, the better the chance they can overpower your acl when you try to recover during a backward fall.
I wonder about this. Can you harden ligaments or increase their size? The space immediately below the kneecap seems to be occupied by ligaments, I think. Mine have decreased signicantly in size there as I've gotten out of shape. Kneeling, as a consequence, is painful there where once it was not. Am I wrong to think this is decreased ligament size, or is there another explanation for this? I should think this area could be strengthened but perhaps someone knowledgeable could chime in.
post #16 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gooberhead View Post
Leg extensions.......then front squats. Weight training creates strong knee support.
Great advice, for creating knee problems. Both these exercises aim at the Quad and building up the Quad without building the opposing muscle (hamstring) causes an imbalance which can lead to ligament damage.
To strengthen the knee, strengthen the surrounding muscles equally. Quadraceps&Hamstrings, Adductor&Abductor.
post #17 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gooberhead
Leg extensions.......then front squats. Weight training creates strong knee support.

.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2-turn View Post
Great advice, for creating knee problems. Both these exercises aim at the Quad and building up the Quad without building the opposing muscle (hamstring) causes an imbalance which can lead to ligament damage.
To strengthen the knee, strengthen the surrounding muscles equally. Quadraceps&Hamstrings, Adductor&Abductor.
Leg Extensions,not a chance. Front Squats,most definitely. Properly done squats,be they front or,back are a posterior chain exercise.
post #18 of 23
The best treatment for a partial MCL tear is to be in an extension blocking brace for 2-3 weeks. The MCL gets progressively stretched from 30 to 0 degrees, and thus will not heal as 'tight' if full ROM is allowed.

There is no specific muscle strengthening program to support the MCL. Secondary stabilizers include the medial hamstrings and sartorius, as well as the ACL. A good fundamental lower body program (squats, dead lifts, lunges) will target these groups in a functional, integrated manner. Balance and agility work would be complementary, and help to avoid recurrent injury (as important as strengthening).

Re. your question of thickening ligaments, this has not been studied in a systematic way, but advocates of prolotherapy (look it up) claim quicker healing and transiently bigger ligaments. The tensile strength, function, and long term outcomes are unknown.

Lastly, suggesting the use of steroids for connective tissue healing is just plain stupid. One of the commonly known causes of spontaneous rupture of load bearing tendons is steroid use/abuse.

Hope that helps.

Matt
post #19 of 23
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the advice, it seems getting better by the day, but really slow. You are right, it feels tight so I did lots of stretching. Will check with the doctor about the extension brace on fool's day appointment. There're too many crooks here in NYC. I was checked twice by a guy and finally figure out he is just a orthopedic physician assistant, not even a real doctor :

Two questions:

- Do I need to lower my DIN settings given that it's already type I? It's a Tyrolia SL10 on Rossignal Budweiser skis, DIN 5.5 for 5'11, 170lb. Never had pre-release issue even when I made all the wrong move struggling down double blacks.

- Now that I know a side push tears MCL, what causes ACL to buckle? A stronger push or any particular wrong move?

Thanks.
post #20 of 23
1) Orthopaedic PAs are generally well trained and it is well within their practice spectrum to diagnose and treat MCL sprains.

2) If you are > 2 weeks out from your initial injury, the utility of an extension block is debatable.

3) If your bindings are set per manufacturer's specs, don't adjust them.

4) There are multiple mechanisms for an ACL tear that are unrelated to a pure (valgus stress) MCL injury mechanism. However, once the MCL is compromised, the ACL acts as a secondary stabilizer - and hence is more at risk. Again, bracing is useful not only to protect the MCL as it heals, but to avoid a secondary injury to the ACL.

You may want to look at some excellent ACL mechanism videos posted here:
http://kneebinding.com/kneebinding_003.htm
post #21 of 23
Whoever, I had an injury to the same part of the knee 5 weeks ago. I thought for sure that I had blown out the medial meniscus - classic case of self-diagnosing hysteria. I went to a therapist who suggested exercises I could do in the gym, since I have been lifting for many years. She suggested riding the excercise bike with low resistence and high revolutions (like 80-90 pm). Very light lifting on the sled until more comfortable. No squatting or ham/gluts leg curls. Lateral rubber band resistence was good (I used this two months ago when I strained the collateral lateral ligament - the one on the other side as the medial). The best and coolest exercise was a modified wall squat. You take a soft, collapsible ball the size of a cantelope melon and put it between your thights just above the knees. Then take a very large workout ball and put it behind you, in the small of the back, and lean up against it on the wall - standing. At this point, you are pressed against the ball, with the smaller one between the legs. Then slowly drop into a seated position while keeping you butt pushed towards the wall to keep the back flat, and keep pressure on to collapse the ball between the legs. Sounds crazy but it really hit the adductors and the architecture in the knee. Hope I have described it well enough. Make sure you chek this out with your therapist or doc. While it helped me, it may not be appropriate since you have a tear and mine was strained. Keep the faith. A month after I thought I was out for the season, I was back on the slopes. I also bought a new pair of skis the day I scheduled the MRI. A little encouragement goes a long way. Good luck. David
post #22 of 23

now here's a really great idea....

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gooberhead View Post
If you have no qualms about a little illegal activity or go to an "anti-aging" clinic........steroids help immensly with injury recovery........both anavar and testosterone help with tendon strength. Deca-durabolin helps the joints by carrying more fluid and increasing collagen synthesis. Plus you build muscle back much quicker.
Let's take some medical advice on the internet from a guy who calls himself gooberhead......
post #23 of 23
Thread Starter 
Thanks, I'm picking up all the exercises and maybe get back on in-inline skate during summer. Seems time is only thing that heals.

My ski binding was supposedly professionally set at Princeton Ski Shop. And two weeks later, they went out of business. The DIN is correct though, guess my ligament was not.
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