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How does XBS really work?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
So as not to drift an existing thread, I'm starting a new one.

I'm intrigued by the XBS system. It sounds like a great system.

Unfortunately, all of the information about it is from marketing morons, and I'm an engineer. It seems that it "pressures the ski evenly, even if you don't". : If I want pressure to go to a certain point on the ski that's how I pressure it, and I don't want it redirected!

Could someone who understands this system please explain it from a physics point of view.

Thanks in advance.
post #2 of 15
I have owned the XBS on my SpeedMachine 16.1 for a few seasons now...and to tell you the truth..I don't feel any difference between the XBS and normal mounting systems...and I test bunches of different skis all the time and get pretty picky about what I feel the ski doing (to/for) me.

I would have to see someone demonstrate to me using pressure gradient measurements along the ski during "out of balance" scenarios with and without XBS to really convince me it works. Maybe I'm just a troll, but I can't feel any behavior difference between the XBS and a ski of the exact same dimensions with a normal mounting system..... oh well. Maybe someone can tell us?

Good question.
post #3 of 15
Big deal! Another Marker system binding. This binding system is easy to install and adjust to any boot between 276 and 370 mm. The system is firmly attached to the ski, but displays more wobble than I experience with say Salomon or Look bindings with direct attachments. In the end, I don't see how an attachment system screwed onto the skis can distribute pressure any differently than standard bindings. This is not a floating system, it acts like a fixed plate, and the bindings do not have a hard direct attachment to the rail, but rather to a rail attachment system. No engineering, but here are some pics.

Here is a side-view of the tracks and the bottom of the bindings, removed from the track. The locking mechanism for size adjustment is a cam operated with thumb pressure and locks into the ridges in the center of the binding track. If you click on the picture it enlarges, and you will see three nubs on the binding lock cam, that mate with the ridges in the track.



The tracks provide a close fit, but are a plastic compound and seem to have some tolerances that could contribute to flexing.



The bindings easily slide onto the track.



And easy to read numbers line up with the locking cam to get the sole size dialed in.



Locking the size adjustment gives a firm click and shows up on the cam in green.


Forward pressure is indicated by a plunger button on the heel.



Engaged:


Did I mention its a sunny day with temps at 72F?
post #4 of 15
I'm with Ghost on this one. No engineer, obviously, but I've peered closely at this binding in the shops, tried to make sense out of the "X" design. If the idea is that force gets transmitted forward along the arms when you're in the backseat, or vice-versa, I'd assume the arms/their attachment to the ski have to be incredibly rigid (and maybe levered?) or you'd lose it all in normal bending. Yet I found a fair amount of slop in the pair I played with. Am I missing something basic here? :
post #5 of 15
I agree the XBX has a "wiggly" fit after a while...definitely rattles a bit on its rails...a little discomforting to feel on the bench when adjusting them...I can't say I feel it on snow...but still...I don't think it's anything earthshaking...but very easy to adjust, as cirquerider says.
post #6 of 15
My buddy I ski with has this binding on a pair of Mach 3's. Anyway, last year we were skiing and he kept coming out of his bindings. It was the first day of a ski trip. We couldn't figure out what was going on. The binding in transit was disengaged from its setting. Apparently the hook moved. We couldn't at first figure out what was going on. Fixing the problem once identified was very easy. I don't know if others with this setup have experienced the binding set points moving, but I thought I'd bring it up for others to comment on.

He hasn't commented on any wobble with the binding. I hate that. I remember 20-25 years ago Salomon toe pieces were infamous for their rollers wearing and the wings of the toe pieces would move.
post #7 of 15
Cirquerider....

thanks for posting the forward pressure pic. I installed the bindings on my Mach 3 and drove myself batty trying to figure out how to check pressure.

How is the pressure adjusted?
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Squeaky Wheel View Post
Cirquerider....

thanks for posting the forward pressure pic. I installed the bindings on my Mach 3 and drove myself batty trying to figure out how to check pressure.

How is the pressure adjusted?
By shortening or lengthening the distance between the toe and heel you either increase or decrease forward pressure. Get the approximate size by reading the gauge, then make small changes until the plunger goes flush. That posi-drive + screw above the forward pressure adjusts DIN.
post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post
By shortening or lengthening the distance between the toe and heel you either increase or decrease forward pressure. Get the approximate size by reading the gauge, then make small changes until the plunger goes flush. That posi-drive + screw above the forward pressure adjusts DIN.
Cool.

Looks like I nailed it blindly by setting the size gauge to my sole length.

thanks.
post #10 of 15
I thought the "novel" aspect was that the heel rail had its hard attachment at the front of the ski and the toe rail hard attached to the rear of the ski? (opposite points only having floating attachments in each case). Or something like that. This supposedly lets the ski correct minor balance issues of the skier. The actual binding pieces and their adjustment are a minor aspects of the system.
post #11 of 15
A have a pair of Hot Rod's and I actually ripped the toe piece off of the rails in a rather spectactular crash. A skier fell in front of me and I hit their skis which launched me airborne. A friend saw something fly into the woods along the side of the trail. The "something" was my toe piece.

There seems to be different amounts of slop or wobble with the Nordica-Marker systems. My 2005/06 Doberman SC's have the XBS system but the toe pieces feel tighter that the toe pieces on my 2006/07 Hot Rods.
post #12 of 15
I use the XBS 14-din/Jet Fuel to arc cord and windbuff. I crank turns on it, but I doubt I ever test the binding.

It has lasted 2 seasons without flaw. I find it really forgiving and solid.

Do I wish I had a system on all my skis?- No.
Do I like it?- Yes. It's solid enough for it's job, it allows me to adjust my center, it's just a flexible plate.

I would never use it on a BM ski, but for crud and cord- it rocks.

It's like a binding to fit the quiver's need.
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219 View Post
I thought the "novel" aspect was that the heel rail had its hard attachment at the front of the ski and the toe rail hard attached to the rear of the ski? (opposite points only having floating attachments in each case). Or something like that.
That was my understanding as well.

Looking at Cirquerider's top pic, if the hard attachment of the -heel- support is underneath the red lettering at the toe then the entire length of the -heel- support will pivot at that hard attachment point, and the flange extension area presses down into the belly of the ski.
525x525px-LL-vbattach2937.jpg
post #14 of 15
Was this set up changed? I have Top Fuels but the bindings don't have the quick adjust system. They are screwed into the rails. I think. I better look. But I know the don't have the release lever.
post #15 of 15
Yes both the heel and toepiece are screwed into the rails in pre drilled holes. I used them today.
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