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MA Request

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
http://video.google.com/videoplay?do...35311543149799

http://video.google.com/videoplay?do...93879506228350



Any comment on these clips is greatly appreciated, especially on my stand ( wide/narrow) and form. This is on the easier diamond slope in June mtn, California.

Thank you very much in advance.
post #2 of 19
Loose,

Do you know the old saying "Loose clips sink tips"? Oh, never mind.

You're turning your feet with ease, you have great speed control and you're having fun on a steep run. We can see you making an effort to close your stance width up in the second clip. In the first clip, you have a wide stance width, but this is appropriate for the technique you are using.


For the speed that you are going, using wedge christie turns and doing a lot of skidding, that wide stance helps to give you braking power and powerful lateral balance.

Your biggest issue with stance is fore/aft balance.

We need to see more body mass in the red zone. With your body this far back, you're going to have to do a lot of pivoting and skidding. We also see no ankle bend whatsoever. We want to see a taller stance with the nose and knees lined up over the toes instead of the shins.

Exercises to help you get more centered include: thousand steps, thousand shuffles and traverse tip tapping. Thousand steps is making rapid tiny step moves throughout the whole turn. Thousand shuffles is similar, but instead of picking the skis up, you shuffle one ski in front of the other back and forth rapidly. Traverse tip tapping is tapping the tip of the ski on the snow while making a straight traverse. Start with tapping your uphill ski first, then work on tapping the downhill ski.

Another area you can work on is moving forward during turn initiation. Your pole touches using just a flick of the wrist are great. But you're not using the pole touch to cue forward movement. An exercise you do to help add this movement to your skiing is called leapers. This is where you make a turn by jumping in the air off your old edges, turning the skis in mid air and landing on your new edges. The key to this exercise is leaping downhill into the new turn.
post #3 of 19

What he said...

...(therusty). Also, I'd get into some different terrain. What you're on looks like it has a pretty good pitch to it. Beyond the technical changes that therusty is talking about, you need to get the Go Factor going on...there's another thread on this. So get on something flat and punch it just a little bit. Make tuck turns if you want. The idea is to let your skis run, edge/pressure more than steering with low edge angle turns not much out of the fall line, and adjust your balancing act so you keep up with your skis as they starting moving out.

I'd also go ski some bumps. As above, your turns are okay, but they're a little passive and don't show a whole lot of attack. Go find some bumps, put yourself into the zipper line, get your feet moving, and see what happens...
post #4 of 19
Thread Starter 
Thanks Therusty for the drawing and analysis. Fore/aft balance is my main concern and looks like that should be my concentration point to do drills.

SkiRacer, you're right my skis tend to move away at the end of the turn and I have to make adjustments at the begining of the turn.
Not too sure how my knees will handle the bumps but I'll keep that in mind. Thanks.
post #5 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post
Exercises to help you get more centered include: thousand steps, thousand shuffles and traverse tip tapping. Thousand steps is making rapid tiny step moves throughout the whole turn. Thousand shuffles is similar, but instead of picking the skis up, you shuffle one ski in front of the other back and forth rapidly. Traverse tip tapping is tapping the tip of the ski on the snow while making a straight traverse. Start with tapping your uphill ski first, then work on tapping the downhill ski.
You are insanely good at giving MA therusty!

Could you please explain to me how rapidly the shuffles are made? Wouldn't he turn the other way when doing this shuffle from one foot to the other? Also.. What do you mean by tapping?
Do you have vid of any of these exercises? - I'd really love to show them to some of my friends with similar problems..
post #6 of 19
(blushing) - thanks grook

no video - I always think of what I need video of when I'm at home and then just go ski when I'm at the mountain. I need to have a shopping list of clips to do and an available cameraman when I need one.

Make the shuffles as rapidly as you can. You'd think this would mess up your turn in the wrong direction, but it really doesn't. What happens is when the "wrong" ski is shuffled ahead it just stalls the turn a little. In general, you just find the exercise hard to do (instead of turning the wrong way) until you get your weight centered.

Tapping is just lifting the ski off the snow and then making ski to snow contact only with the tip of the ski. Touch the snow briefly then lift it back into the air. For extra style points keep the ski level to the snow while airborne. Otherwise at least keep the tail higher than the tip. Tap as many times as possible and try tapping hard enough to bend the ski. You'll find this exercise extremely hard to do if your weight is in the back seat. If you bend your ankles to get centered it's easy.
post #7 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post
(blushing) - thanks grook

no video - I always think of what I need video of when I'm at home and then just go ski when I'm at the mountain. I need to have a shopping list of clips to do and an available cameraman when I need one.

Make the shuffles as rapidly as you can. You'd think this would mess up your turn in the wrong direction, but it really doesn't. What happens is when the "wrong" ski is shuffled ahead it just stalls the turn a little. In general, you just find the exercise hard to do (instead of turning the wrong way) until you get your weight centered.

Tapping is just lifting the ski off the snow and then making ski to snow contact only with the tip of the ski. Touch the snow briefly then lift it back into the air. For extra style points keep the ski level to the snow while airborne. Otherwise at least keep the tail higher than the tip. Tap as many times as possible and try tapping hard enough to bend the ski. You'll find this exercise extremely hard to do if your weight is in the back seat. If you bend your ankles to get centered it's easy.
Thanks for the extra explanation, I'll put them to the test tomorrow on two of my friends I'm in Sölden right now and needed some exercises for them.. Btw. when tapping the downhill ski... What's the chance of not skidding? :
post #8 of 19
99% chance of not skidding. You're supposed to do this during a traverse. I suppose one could attempt to do this while performing a skidded traverse, but that would make it a stupid pet trick instead of a drill.
post #9 of 19
Shape the turn first!! Balance will come.....your turn is a comma or parenthesis shape, it should be C shaped. Finish your turn to allow balance to return before you move to the next turn.
post #10 of 19
Ummmm...Thousand steps is a lateral balance drill......
Other things to think about: "Open the hip".

This is certainly the easiest quick fix way to get forwards.

You'll be taller (except at transition, you still have to flex to release) and you will have moved your mass forwards. Naturally, the ankles will have to compensate/flex more and take more weight to adjust to this new posture. But how do you KNOW that you are forwards enough?

I'd recommend doing pivot slips. (Thousand steps is a lateral balance drill......)

To do these properly requires that you are centered. Start on dryland, on a carpet with two sheets of paper under your stockinged feet.

You should be able to pivot the feet and make a 'X' pattern. Not a 'V' or 'A', but an 'X'. Do this without rotating the hips at all, just by rotating the femurs in their hip sockets. Again, to do this properly, means you must be balanced above that pivot point. When you get good at this, take it to the snow, and try it with just your boots on -- you may have to jump, or the snow could be slippery enough. Either way the hips stay still ( I put my hands on my hips -- the way the elbows point magnifies the hip motion.)

Then, when you feel it's going well, take it to the hill, and pivot through your entire turn. Now, you might say, "Hey, when I do this, all I can do is skid! I want to carve my turns."

Fair enough.

But what you have learned from doing this drill is that you got forwards and that the upper and lower body CAN move separately. If you really do just want to carve, you can allow your legs to follow the skis, (by allowing the femurs to rotate in the hip sockets) while the body can "counteract" the tendency to twist with the skis by twisting in the OTHER direction. This is really going a bit too far right now, but I just wanted to mention the benefits of learning how to pivot slip are not restricted to skidded turns.

Hope this helps, and now I'm climbing into my bunker.
post #11 of 19
Ummmm - Pivot Slip is a rotary drill
Have you ever seen someone do 1000 steps from the backseat? Any drill with hopping or stepping will help to get fore/aft balance centered. Some drills are multi purpose. Heck, there's even a forward movement component in a pivot slip.
post #12 of 19
Yes, pivot slip IS a rotary drill.

But your axis of rotation and balance point have to line up over the same spot on the feet for the drill to be remotely successful.

Maintaining that alignment includes a forward component. That's why here, I'm after pivot slips, and bringing that pivotting into the turn -- to have a way of maintaining centered alignment through the turn itself.

I have seen "thousand steps" done from the backseat. IMO, it's not very difficult. Pivot slips are a different story.

I don't usually recommend them, because the majority of people simply can't do them and walk away frustrated. I always recommend some dryland preparation before trying them on the hill -- coordinating the movement is not simple.
post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE View Post
To do these properly requires that you are centered. Start on dryland, on a carpet with two sheets of paper under your stockinged feet.

You should be able to pivot the feet and make a 'X' pattern. Not a 'V' or 'A', but an 'X'. Do this without rotating the hips at all, just by rotating the femurs in their hip sockets. Again, to do this properly, means you must be balanced above that pivot point. When you get good at this, take it to the snow, and try it with just your boots on -- you may have to jump, or the snow could be slippery enough. Either way the hips stay still ( I put my hands on my hips -- the way the elbows point magnifies the hip motion.)
I don't get it I don't need this drill for myself, but I sure would like to teach my friends with it... What is an 'X' pattern? Could you explain it in an easier way?
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE View Post
I have seen "thousand steps" done from the backseat. IMO, it's not very difficult. Pivot slips are a different story.
Big E - I guess we'll have to disagree on this one. My experience has been that thousand steps works much better at getting people out of the backseat than pivot slips.
post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by GrooK View Post
I don't get it I don't need this drill for myself, but I sure would like to teach my friends with it... What is an 'X' pattern? Could you explain it in an easier way?
Grook,

The objective is to turn the feet as if you were standing on a lazy suzan (i.e. a spinning disk supported only in the center).

If you were on snow in boots and rotated your feet with the pivot point underneath the middle of the foot, the toes would scrape off the snow inside the top part of the X and the heels would scrape off snow inside the bottom part of the X. If you just turned your toes and kept your heels fixed in position, your feet would scrape off snow inside of a V shape. If you kept your toes fixed, your heels would scrape out an A shape.
post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post
Grook,

The objective is to turn the feet as if you were standing on a lazy suzan (i.e. a spinning disk supported only in the center).

If you were on snow in boots and rotated your feet with the pivot point underneath the middle of the foot, the toes would scrape off the snow inside the top part of the X and the heels would scrape off snow inside the bottom part of the X. If you just turned your toes and kept your heels fixed in position, your feet would scrape off snow inside of a V shape. If you kept your toes fixed, your heels would scrape out an A shape.
Arh I see Isn't that a skidding lesson? Btw. sorry for turning the thread into this
post #17 of 19
Grook,

It is certainly understandable why some people would think this drill would promote skidding. The important thing to understand about the pivot slip drill is that one of its goals is to experience femur rotation. Femur rotation is an essential component of carving. Whether it is useful to consciously be aware of femur rotation or to attempt to purposely induce femur rotation has been debated. No matter which side of the debate you're on, there is a distinct difference between:
1) turning your feet without turning your leg above the knee or turning your hips
2) turning your feet only by turning your entire leg with it and not your hips too
3) turning your feet with assistance from turning your hips
If you can do #2 in a pivot slip drill, you don't have to skid your turns.
post #18 of 19
therusty,

I agree that there are better drills than pivot slips for getting forward, as most people can't come close to doing them. However, I do think this fellow could benefit from doing them, which IMO is rare.
post #19 of 19
Thread Starter 
I'm really appreciated and thank you BigE, therusty and everyone for the critiques and comments.
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