EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Patrol Shack › Thank you Winter Park Patrol (Why you should wear a helmet and goggles)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Thank you Winter Park Patrol (Why you should wear a helmet and goggles)

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
A year or so back I posted on this thread regarding my displeasure of the actions of the Winter Park Patrol. Well, I had another encounter and I would like to praise them.

Last Monday my friend and I were skiing under the Panoramic and were cutting through the trees from one run to another. Behind me I heard the crack of a branch breaking and my friend yelling for me. I ran back and found that he had taken a branch to the face, mostly the right eye area. The branch was about 3 inches around and stuck out from the tree about 20 inches. He never saw it coming.

I was able to get him out of the trees and down to the Sunnyside lift where Patrol was contacted. They were very prompt, courteous, and efficient. From the time they arrived on scene, till he was checked in to the clinic, the Patrol did a wonderful job. I would like to say thank you.

FYI, my friend ended up losing his sight in that eye and needing plastic surgery to fix the orbital. He is one of these people who always skied in sunglasses and without a helmet. I tried to convince him to wear goggles and a helmet, especially since it was not uncommon for us to mess around in the trees. However, he was stubborn and would not listen. Earlier in the day we were underneath the Eagle Wind lift going down a tree/bump filled run when I took a branch on the top of the helmet. It knocked me off balance, but that was it. If I would have been without a helmet, I would probably have a concussion and need many stitches. I would advise anyone who skis in the trees without wearing a helmet and goggles to rethink this. Do not wait until you have a similar accident. Lifes best lessons are those learned from others.
post #2 of 15
yes difinately, goggles are obvious, just so you can see better. Helmets are definitely a good idea, the main reason for me is if your skiing through the tree's, theres a tight "green" gap (green stuff bends) you can pretty much just stick your helmet into it and power through. and yes I have been traversing and nailed a tree on the top of my head, without a helmet I would have been screwed.
post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 

Update

In case any of you read this thread and were wondering, my friend originally had a <1% chance of getting any sight in the eye, and it was though he would probably lose the eye itself. Well, after three surgeries, he can now see objects in the entire field of vision of that eye. The doctor cannot believe the progress he is making. There is still no determination as to how good his sight will be, but some sight is better than none. He is very upbeat and I believe it will make him progress even faster.
post #4 of 15
Wow, what a story, an "eye-opener" indeed!

Kudos to the patrol!!
post #5 of 15
I had not seen this thread before. Good for your friend for making such a remarkable recovery. Here's hoping it continues all the way back to 100%.

Along with warmth and comfort, the unseen branch is the reason I wear a helmet all the time.
post #6 of 15
First, glad your friend is doing well. Hope he continues to progress.

Goggles are key. Unfortunately, it is fairly common to see skiers who are pushing their ability limits in the trees get overheated, start to fog up, and take off their goggles.

Several times lately I started conversations with strangers stopped in the trees and urged them to put their goggles back on before they resume skiing.

Your friend's accident does bring up a real question, though. I mostly think in terms of twigs poking you in the eye. Are goggle lenses strong enough to withstand a direct hit from the end of a sizeable branch?
post #7 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post
Are goggle lenses strong enough to withstand a direct hit from the end of a sizeable branch?
Perhaps not but the chances of a glancing impact seem much better with slippery goggles than the corner of your eye socket.
post #8 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post
Are goggle lenses strong enough to withstand a direct hit from the end of a sizeable branch?
I understand what you are saying. Right after the accident, he was laying just off the traverse and asked for a few minutes to compose himself before we started out of the trees. I took the opportunity to make sure the branch was completely broken off. Given the angle of the branch, and the direction he was moving, the branch would have struck the goggles, but most of the impact would have been absorbed by the side of the helmet.
post #9 of 15
I don;t want my Q to distract from the main point -- eye protection is important in the trees.

I think bumpfreaq's "more chance to slide off" point is a good one.

And I do think that catching a twig is a more frequent issue, where goggles pretty much completely solve the problem.

Obviously there is some maximum accident where you are screwed no matter what you are wearing. In any case, it seems to me that sunglasses are better than nothing, goggles are better than sunglasses, and goggles+helmet are better than goggles alone.
post #10 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post
In any case, it seems to me that sunglasses are better than nothing, goggles are better than sunglasses, and goggles+helmet are better than goggles alone.
Yep
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post
Your friend's accident does bring up a real question, though. I mostly think in terms of twigs poking you in the eye. Are goggle lenses strong enough to withstand a direct hit from the end of a sizeable branch?
Actually, you should ask yourself this question: If you were to take a hit from a sizeable branch directly to your eye, would you prefer to be wearing nothing, or wearing goggles ?

There is no such thing as perfect protection in all circumstances. As we have seen, heavily armoured main battle tanks can fall victim to homemade explosive devices, and the best personal protection will not withstand a direct impact with a large object that you are supposed to avoid. However, wearing any protection can minimize or avoid injury, and should be used. That combined with being careful, should allow you to avoid losing your eyesight to large branches!

Dean.
post #12 of 15
So I'm watching a Warren Miller classic Cold Fusion and I have yet to see any of the skiers/boarders without helmet/goggles.

Ya think the best of the best know something?

Think snow, be safe, ski again.
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by FRDMFTR View Post
So I'm watching a Warren Miller classic Cold Fusion and I have yet to see any of the skiers/boarders without helmet/goggles.

Ya think the best of the best know something?

Think snow, be safe, ski again.
No. The best of the best want to make sure that they can be recognized by the babes at any mountain they go to. Remember, the nice thing about movies is that recordings of the really stupid things they do get left on the cutting room floor, where you will never see them.
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dean View Post
No. The best of the best want to make sure that they can be recognized by the babes at any mountain they go to. Remember, the nice thing about movies is that recordings of the really stupid things they do get left on the cutting room floor, where you will never see them.
post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by karpiel View Post
I misread it. Never mind.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Patrol Shack
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Patrol Shack › Thank you Winter Park Patrol (Why you should wear a helmet and goggles)