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Fiberlene...The Breakfast of Champions

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
I'm gearing up for another ski tuning tool frenzy. I was wondering about Fiberlene sheets. What is the benefit of Fiberlene over, say a good quality shop paper towel?
post #2 of 20
I am not 100% positive, but I believe the Fiberlene is a synthetic material and is therefore somewhat lint free. I am sure there are other properties that the paper towels don't have, but I will leave that up to the experts.
post #3 of 20
Fiberlene can handle heat better if you use it between base and iron to absorb wax. It also has less lint as SJB says (good if you are into 'clean room' waxing concerns). Some use it for polishing after waxing & scraping (sometimes after brushing) since it is slightly more abrasive than paper towels. This abrasiveness also helps with cleaning. Both options are good to have around.

(I would never even think of using quality shop towels for 90% of cleaning and waxing tasks.).
post #4 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
Fiberlene can handle heat better if you use it between base and iron to absorb wax. It also has less lint as SJB says (good if you are into 'clean room' waxing concerns). Some use it for polishing after waxing & scraping (sometimes after brushing) since it is slightly more abrasive than paper towels. This abrasiveness also helps with cleaning. Both options are good to have around.

(I would never even think of using quality shop towels for 90% of cleaning and waxing tasks.).
I'm curious, when do you use fiberlene between base and iron to absorb wax?
post #5 of 20
It is one method used to reduce scraping and mess since excess wax can be absorbed. Couple that with crayoning, and you can get down to little or no scraping, depending on preferences. This also can be very helpful or desirable if you don't have time or energy to deal with extra scraping and brushing required for hard waxes.
post #6 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by oisin View Post
I'm curious, when do you use fiberlene between base and iron to absorb wax?
Oisin, After you heat wax and have made several passes over the base with your iron, Cut a piece of fiberlene a bit larger than you iron base, place fiberlene on the base of your ski, on the melted wax, I do it from tip to tail, place your hot iron on top of the fiberlene and grab the fiberline with your fingers, that's why you cut it a bit larger than your iron base, pull the fiberlene with the iron on top of it to the other end of the ski, judge the pull speed by the look of the wax it will have cooled a bit before the pull and should re melt as you pull, obviously don't pull so slowly as to overheat the ski, pull at a slow-moderate speed until you are at the end of the ski. The fiberlene will have absorbed some of the wax and will look wet. Wax on base of ski will be smooth except for the point where you lift the iron and fiberlene off the tail. I sometimes go over this area again.
post #7 of 20
Good description Mark.....and now for some imagery (though this is a teflon sheet, it's the same method):



I suppose you could argue that it may be best to let the skis or snowboards cool so the wax hardens. Then when you reheat and use the fiberlene/wax removal approach, you might be more likely to draw the top layer of liquified wax.

An additional thought, this also could be used in lieu of hot scraping where theoretically, old wax, dirt and gradoo can be drawn off as well.
post #8 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
Good description Mark.....and now for some imagery (though this is a teflon sheet, it's the same method):



I suppose you could argue that it may be best to let the skis or snowboards cool so the wax hardens. Then when you reheat and use the fiberlene/wax removal approach, you might be more likely to draw the top layer of liquified wax.

WOW!!!!! WHAT AN IRON:, KINDA SCARY. So, Terry, do YOU let the wax cool before the dragging process, if so I assume not too long.
post #9 of 20
anybody try using a plain brown bag to soak up the excess wax instead of fiberlene?

i got the idea from some home cleaning site for removing candle wax from suede. however, you might remove all the wax from the skis so maybe not a good idea...
post #10 of 20
That's like the Valentine-1 of wax irons! Does it tell you if the fuzz is on the way?
post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by mkevenson View Post
WOW!!!!! WHAT AN IRON:, KINDA SCARY. So, Terry, do YOU let the wax cool before the dragging process, if so I assume not too long.
That bad boy is from a Maplus stock photo, but it is digital and sweet. It might even be 220V :.

It depends on time, timing and mojo. More likely if using this method I'll probably be doing it sooner than later. But, I can actually scrape the few extra times and roto brush faster (except maybe RB Hard) than using this method to get the bases dialed....plus it starts with applying the minimal amount of wax to start......or use liquids or sprays.



Regarding brown paper bags, I haven't used it, but the filberlene or shop towels are more absorbent. The brown paper bag method is used for removing climbing skin glue.
post #12 of 20
Terry wrote:"though this is a teflon sheet, it's the same method):"

Terry, the teflon sheet is something that I have not used. Due to the price difference between it and Fiberlene I assume that it is used for different applications or added benefit. Is this correct? Could you please go into a bit of detail as to the use and advantages of the teflon.

Mark
post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
That's like the Valentine-1 of wax irons! Does it tell you if the fuzz is on the way?
No, but you can cook burgers on it......
post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by mkevenson View Post
Terry wrote:"though this is a teflon sheet, it's the same method):"

Terry, the teflon sheet is something that I have not used. Due to the price difference between it and Fiberlene I assume that it is used for different applications or added benefit. Is this correct? Could you please go into a bit of detail as to the use and advantages of the teflon.

Mark
Teflon is essentially a base protector and heat transfer method recommended by Maplus to use when heating liquids and sprays to increase durability to beyond that of hot waxed solids. They are applied in such thin layers, compared to typical hot waxing of solids, the teflon replaces the extra thickness of the wax that acts as a lubricant or buffer between the iron and base. It could also be used over crayoned on solids, creams or rub-ons to maximize durability. It's a good transitional technique if you are concerned about toasting your bases when going thin. Once you get the hang of it you can decide whether or not to continue using it or free-handing it....
post #15 of 20
Thanks, Terry, one other question from the audience:, is the teflon sheet a one time use, ie; can you reuse the same sheet, or is that a ...?
post #16 of 20
The paper towels would come apart if I used base cleaner.
post #17 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by mkevenson View Post
Thanks, Terry, one other question from the audience:, is the teflon sheet a one time use, ie; can you reuse the same sheet, or is that a ...?
It can be used multiple times, but degrades, gets curly and disfigured (kinda like me).: Frequency is variable depending on how much heat is applied, duration, how you store it and other factors....6 to 12 times, I'm guessing, possibly more, though YMMV.

Comprex, good point on another benefit to the fiberlene over paper towels. I haven't had too much problem with tougher blue shop towels. And certainly none using Bio Citron or other lighter cleaners/wax removers....and Simple Green.
post #18 of 20
FWIW, I didn't think to mention previously regarding shop towels, that I find that if I cut the rolls in half, the 6" sections are a handier size and fit the width of skis and scrapers nicer.
post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
(good if you are into 'clean room' waxing concerns)
I actually measure the cleanliness of my base in parts/million.
post #20 of 20
To remove wax instead of scraping, I use about 3' of fiberlene (I cut a roll in half, so the sheet is only the width of a ski.

While the ski is still hot from ironing in the wax, I start at the tip of the ski with the iron on one end of the fiberlene, and as I move the iron down the ski, I pull the fiberlene from under the iron as it absorbs wax to expose fresh fiberlene under the iron. You can tell from how much wax the fiberlene is absorbing how fast to pull the fiberlene out. If the fiberlene comes out from under the iron wet, I pull faster.

It takes a little dexterity, but do that, then rotobrush and you are done. It helps a lot with colder wax (Swix HC Blue or White) where wax tends to fracture when you scrape it.
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