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Help with turns

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Height 5-2
Weight 110
Skis 138cm Atomic Balanze
Boots: started with basic rentals...just bought Salomon Idol 8


I've recently returned to skiing after a 13 year break. I wasn't terribly good back then, but I am determined to get better(skied mostly intermediate but tried without success to try some black diamond runs). I did a seasonal rental (so I'm skiing the same equipment) I took a private lesson last week and felt like I was making some good turns on easy slopes...and ready to try a little steeper stuff. My feet were moving around in the rental boots and despite several attempts at fixing the problem...I went and got fitted for new boots (much stiffer I must add). So now I go out today...ready to try the new boots and skied like it was my first day again. I kept losing the edge on the downhill ski 3/4 way through the arc (on the left left). It was very frustraiting. Any suggestions where I should go from here?
post #2 of 14
Where do you ski? Perhaps you just need to get some miles in your boots. Perhaps you need boot alignment. Perhaps another lesson would be helpful once your boots are broken in.
post #3 of 14
Mtnbikegirl--Welcome to EpicSki!

It's hard--impossible, really--to say what caused your problems from your short description. It may or may not be related to the new boots you're on. Do they fit? Have you had them set up properly? If they are stiff and fit snugly, they will restrict your foot and ankle movements significantly, so it is critical that they are set up just right. Once you get them just right, those new, snug boots will help you ski and progress quickly.

I encourage you to take another lesson--private or group--and tell your instructor exactly what's up. A good instructor will be able to pinpoint any problems, in either your equipment or your technique and tactics, and help you improve quickly.

Please keep us posted. If you can be more specific about exactly what you find happening, or post a little video of yourself skiing, perhaps someone here will be able to give you more helpful suggestions. Best of luck!

Best regards,
Bob Barnes
post #4 of 14
Thread Starter 
I'm about 20 mins from Mt. Bachelor, so I have been going up 2-3 times a week for about 2 hrs while the kiddos are in school. It's been great to get my feet wet again, as my first few days back on the skis weren't pretty.

With that said, I was leaning towards just getting some time in the boots over the next 2-3 weeks and letting my legs get used to them while packing them in a bit before getting some adjustments done while concentrating on relaxing through the turn. It was just very frustrating to keep losing that edge through the turn. Now that being said, the conditions were very hard packed with a thin layer of new snow (not sure if that matters.)
post #5 of 14
Yes, it sounds like the conditions probably played a big role, especially combined with new, unfamiliar equipment. Skiing very hard snow smoothly and consistently takes very good technique, as well as well-adjusted and tuned equipment.

Don't let yourself get frustrated with a little skidding on those challenging conditions. Try again when the snow is better, to get your confidence back and get used to your equipment. You might find that early in the morning, on a freshly groomed run, is the best bet for good snow in spring. Second-best may be late morning or early afternoon on a warm, sunny day, after the sun has had a chance to soften the conditons a bit.

But do consider some more lessons. Good instructors will help you find the best snow, as they dramatically shorten the learning curve and prevent you from falling into frustrating bad habits. Skiing is one sport where trial and error work poorly, often causing people to learn

Best regards,
Bob
post #6 of 14
Thread Starter 
Let me see if I can describe it...I feel like I'm entering the turn pretty good, turning the inside ski, weighting the outside ski, turning it on edge, moving through the turn and then about 3/4's through the arc, the outside ski loses the edge and I have to quickly adjust or I feel like I'm just going to slide out. I have had better luck keeping the edge using one foot to go through the turn, with the inside ski lifted slightly as a drill.

I'm thinking that after I give myself some boot time, another lesson should be in order, as you suggested Bob
post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtnbikegirl
My feet were moving around in the rental boots and despite several attempts at fixing the problem...I went and got fitted for new boots (much stiffer I must add). So now I go out today...ready to try the new boots and skied like it was my first day again.
One thing I haven't seen mentioned yet: your new boots (courtesy of them having a snugger fit and being much stiffer then your old rental boots) are going to transmit much subtler movements of your feet into your skis.

Previously (courtesy of your "feet moving around in the rental boots") you may have had to make fairly large coarse movements in order to get your skis to do much of anything... Now if you make those same moves you could easily be overpowering your skis and thus causing them to lose their rather tenuous grip on the snow. (Snugger and stiffer also implies that your skis will start responding to moves you didn't know you were making in the first place).

I've had similair things happen -- i.e., new boots = "what the heck happened to me?" in the past. Once I started thinking "be subtle, be gentle, start with the feet" -- well, it was back to "game on".

As Bob Barnes said, it's hard to say exactly what the root cause of your issues is right now, but perhaps the above will help somewhat. Keep us posted!
post #8 of 14
Which Atomic Balanze, 11, 9.7, 9.6, 3.1?
Sounds like your just putting too much force through the edge and the ski is letting go when gravity gets added to the turning force. Try flexing a bit during the last 1/4 of the turn to ease up on the load.
post #9 of 14
Quote:
One thing I haven't seen mentioned yet: your new boots (courtesy of them having a snugger fit and being much stiffer then your old rental boots) are going to transmit much subtler movements of your feet into your skis.

Previously (courtesy of your "feet moving around in the rental boots") you may have had to make fairly large coarse movements in order to get your skis to do much of anything... Now if you make those same moves you could easily be overpowering your skis and thus causing them to lose their rather tenuous grip on the snow. (Snugger and stiffer also implies that your skis will start responding to moves you didn't know you were making in the first place).

I've had similair things happen -- i.e., new boots = "what the heck happened to me?" in the past. Once I started thinking "be subtle, be gentle, start with the feet" -- well, it was back to "game on".
Good stuff, Kevin. Dead on!

Best regards,
Bob
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes/Colorado View Post
Good stuff, Kevin. Dead on!

Best regards,
Bob
Also true. You could be loosing the front edge by weighting the rear too much, putting too much weight on the inside ski, or a host of other problems. Hard to say with seeing you ski.
post #11 of 14
Thread Starter 
Hey thanks for all the advice/ideas. I went up to the hill again today after dumping the kids at ski school. OMG what a difference a day makes! With all of your thoughts in mind, I hit the slopes and after a few runs felt great and was back to working on what I had gone over with the instructor last week. I never realized how hard I was working to make my turns. It was so much easier today. Between being subtle, patient through the turns (I have a very bad habit of trying to force the turn to finish before it "naturally" should) and adjusting my buckles as needed throughout the runs, I really feel like I'm going to get used to the boots over the next couple of weeks.

Using a bike analogy...it reminds me of when I went from my fat wheeled beach cruiser to my teeny, tiny, itty bitty pocket rocket road bike. The road bike was what I call "twitchy" and took some getting used to.

Thanks guys for the help. I'll be getting another lesson in the not too distant future to help me transfer what I'm working on to some steeper slopes.
post #12 of 14
Glad to hear that your skiing is back to normal! Those are always frustrating days when you feel that you can't make a decent turn to save your life. (Lord knows that happens to me more often then I care to admit...). Getting a focus like you suggested of being patient or being subtle is sometimes all it takes to "get back into the groove".
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtnbikegirl View Post
Thanks guys for the help. I'll be getting another lesson in the not too distant future to help me transfer what I'm working on to some steeper slopes.
Next time you are headed up send a PM to me or Slider. Would be fun to make some turns together. We can also help you translate what is troubling you to text so you can get advice here on Epic. And if you are really brave we can even add in video (but only if you really want to take that crazy leap).
post #14 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max_501 View Post
Next time you are headed up send a PM to me or Slider. Would be fun to make some turns together. We can also help you translate what is troubling you to text so you can get advice here on Epic. And if you are really brave we can even add in video (but only if you really want to take that crazy leap).
I'll be going up next week as now I've gone and got "new to me" skis from the demo shop and am going to pick up that pesky spring pass I've been waiting to come on sale.
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